Customer Reviews for

When the Legends Die

Average Rating 4
( 51 )
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(18)

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 51 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2001

    Great book about finding who you are!

    This is a great book about finding who you are...but it is a little too slow for my taste at first. After a while, when the story is developed, it gets exciting. This is a good book for people of all ages, especially guys.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2001

    An Emotional Story

    This story was very uplifting and reflects the stages of normal growth.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2001

    BETRAYAL OF FRIENDS FOCUS OF BORLAND'S NOVEL

    In When the Legends Die, Hal Borland discusses the themes of finding your identity and betrayal of friends. He covers these topics perfectly by taking the reader through all sections of Thomas Black Bull's life. Thomas Black Bull, lonely Ute Indian, goes through life fining out that people he thought were his friends were really not. 'He was alone,' and 'he was a throwback right out of the old, old days.' This book didn't have enough action, and it was really boring. That is why I didn't like it. I would not recommend this book to anyone unless they are an indian that had trouble with friends betraying them, or people that do not like a lot of action in their books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2001

    When the Legends Die

    In When The Legends Die Hal Borland incorporates many themes. For example he writes about discrimination and mistreatment of indians. He covers these themes in detail throughout the book showing us the many changes in Thomas Black Bull. For instance he changes his name from 'Bear's Brother' to 'Killer Tom Black'. He suffers many losses through each of these changes. He mournes the loss of both his parents,Bessie and George Black Bull. Although this book is hard for me to understand, it may not be the same for you. Any teenager that has dealt with the loss of a loved one can relate to this book. This book is ok,but I don't really recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2001

    When the Legends Die

    In When The Legends Die Hal Borland talks about the themes of betrayal and remembering your heritage. He implies these themes by giving the reader menatal images about Tom and Blue Elk throughout the novel. Tom ' a typical Ute' has to deal with Blue Elk or 'Fat Belly' decieving him. Any person who has had traditions passed down can relate to the book which is why I enjoyed it. The book also has many of the same situations that teenagers go through. I also recommend this book to anyone who believes in doing what they want. Hope you enjoy reading this book as much as I did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2001

    When the Legends Die

    In When The Legends Die Hal Borland discusses the themes of keeping heritage and mistreatment of Indians. Borland covers the themes very well using specific details and imagery of the harshness of growing up and the mistreatment of Indians. Tom 'self-sufficient and living alone' deals with the devastating death of his mother and father and is taken to a reservation to live. There he is severely mistreated and mad fun of by his roomate, Luther Spotted Dog. I liked this book because I believe many people can relate to the hard time he had growing up. If you don't like books that kind of deal with nature you probably wouldn't like this book. I also recommend this book to anyone who likes Indian stories.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2001

    Rediscovering One's Past

    In the novel 'When the Legends Die', Hal Borland canvasses the themes of respecting one's heritage and the mistreatment of indians. Borland makes these themes easily seen in the way he uses specific examples of discrimination against indians and how the main character, Tom attempts to change his life. Tom who is a 'breech-clout indian' trys to sheild his past by forgetting who he is and where he comes from. During his life he meets several people that he feels 'he killed,' and they help him realize that he has destroyed all of the demons on his past. This is a story of rediscovering the pastand where he came from, and I enjoyed reading it. It was interesting at most parts, and I liked the story of an indian becoming a nationwide famous bronc rider that people made stories about. I recommend this book for anyone that trys to be someone they are not, because it shows them that the only important thing is your heritage and that is something that you can not escape from.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2001

    One of the best Indian fiction tales ever!!

    In, 1912 the Indian nation was struggling to assimilate. After a repetedrobbery one indian man, Jim Black Bull, set out to kill the robber and a fellow indian. He knew he had to flee civilization due to white mans' law,so he took his wife to the mountains to live the old way. After a year the father died and it was up to the young boy, Bears Brother, and his mother to survive. the mother lived before three years before she died of a common flu. He lived for several years in the mountains, until an old family friend set out to find Bears Brother and he eventually found him. Bears Brother had to ajust to his new life. His name was changed to Thomas and his religion became Christianinty. He had such a hard time assimilating, he went to live with a sheepherder and helped take care of the sheep. Although he did well, he did not like it. When a man asked him if he wanted to become a bronco rider he quickly accepted. Thomas had found his calling as Devil Tom, the bronco rider who rode horses to death. While he was doing this he had some wild experiences. I would recommend to find out what he does next. When the Legends Die opens the readers' eye to see what it was like to be an Indian. It shows the hardships that the Indians had to bare due to the white men. The descriptions in the book are so vivid that the reader feels like they are actually experiencing it for themselves. This book is exciting and makes you laugh, frown, gasp, and cheer out loud.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2001

    HAL BORLAND'S NOVAL EXPRESSES DIFFICULTIES OF BEING YOURSELF

    In 'when The Legends Die' Hal Borland discusses the theme of finding your identity and discrimination of indians. Borland uses excellent details and events to express the theme completely. 'who are you' is a question that occurs throughout the book which decribes Tom Black who has lost his identity. 'The old ways are gone' describes how indians were forced to give up their appearence,culture,and land to convert to the lifestyle of whites. Anyone who has dealt with the difficulties of discrimination or finding their identity can relate to this book, which is why I enjoyed reading it. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading about situations that can occur in everyday life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2001

    'My name is Tom Black Bull...or is it?'

    'Who am I?' 'I do not need the new ways!' These are the main quotes that depict the themes in Hal Borland's When the Legends Die. The book is about how a boy named Tom deals with Indian oppresion, and how he is forced to accept the white ways. The book also thoroughly dialogues a man's search for himself and his heritage. I enjoyed this book to a certain extent. It accurately views Indian oppression through the eyes of a survivor. If you are a reader who enjoys history, and the insights into people's lives, I strongly suggest you read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2001

    When the Legends Die

    In When The Legends Die Hal Borland discusses themes as of Betrayel and mistreatment of identity. Borland covers the themes really well with good detail that gives vivid images in the readers mind. Thomas 'Bear's Brother' feels betrayed by his brother the bear for not responding to his call, while Blue Elk 'an old native' keeps him captive on a reservation forcing him to use the new ways. Anyone wanting to learn of native American history and how they were changed, I strongly recommend this book. This, and another reason why I enjoyed it and recommend this to others is its suspenseful actions in major events of the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2001

    When the Boredom Thrives

    When the Legends Die is a novel written by Hal Borland. The novel expresses the themes of letting go of the past and the life of a maturing indian boy. In the novel, Tom 'little indian boy' is portrayed as a boy living in the mountain alone, reservation boy, bronc rider, and a sheep herder. He finds himself by riding broncs in the rodeo how Red Dillon makes him. I could not get into the novel because of its overuse of key words and points. The novel had one main point to get the reader intrigued with animal abuse instead of a plot. That is why I didn't like the novel. 'Killer Tom' was not good enough for a good novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2001

    Great True Life Indian Portrayal

    Hal Borland did an exceptionally great job of portraying real Indian life in When the Legends Die. I enjoyed this novel about a young Indian boy growing up and facing the burdens of his past. 'And she told the old tales and sang the old songs.' This quote shows a wonderful mother-son relationship, which is one of my favorite things about this book. 'I shall call myself Bear's Brother.' This quote shows how great the friendship is between the boy and the bear. This friendship is very touching. Borland adresses the theme of loneliness very well. Throughout the book the boy finds and loses many short term friends. I enjoyed this book however, I would choose to read about other topics.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2001

    My review of When the Legends Die

    In 'When the Legends Die' Hal Borland writes about the discrimination and mistreatment of Native Americans, he also discusses a person who is trying to find his meaning in life. Borland discusses these themes by following the life of a ' Ute Indian Boy' as he grows up. In Tom's life he faces many difficult problems and tragedies. Some of them being tricked many times by a 'wiry red-haired man' named Red Dillon and trying to find hisself at the end of the book. The interesting life that Tom leads keeps one interested in the book throughout the whole thing. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys Native American history and also American History.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2001

    Discrimination of Indians

    In When The Legends Die Hal Borland expresses the themes mistreatment and discrimination of indians.Borland gives good details and ideas to support those themes.One of Borlands main characters Bessie, is a loving and traditional person.She wants to keep her Ute heritage going.I really liked this book, one because it gave mental images and makes you want to keep reading. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to know about indians and how they live.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2001

    Importance of Finding your Identity

    In When The Legends Die Hal Borland infers the question 'who are you.' Borland covers this topic exceptionally well, by creating images that are extremely realistic you feel as if you are part of the story. Tom swears he will never return to the white man's world. He will dress in 'his moccasins and his clout.' I enjoyed this book for many reasons. I found the book outrageously interesting, never wanting to put it down. If you enjoy books that you feel incorporated in, this is the book for you. Borland creates realistic images that pull you into the book. I also found this book encouraging in that Tom accomplishes something no one thinks he can

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2001

    Searching....

    In When Legends Die Hal Borland stresses the theme of searching for yourself. He invisions this theme by having Tom have flashbacks and looking into his thoughts. Tom wants to destroy his past of being a Ute indian by being a rodeo rider. Thomas is a confused man that wants to take his feelings out on the horses. I really liked this book. This book is very easy to get into to and you will not want to put it down. The only part that I didn't like about this book was that it had to much detail and went on to long.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2001

    Respecting Your Heritage

    In WheThe Legends Die Hal Borland discusses the themes of Respecting your heritage. Hal Borland covers these topics very well. The words he chooses create vivid pictures in your mind. His words also allow you to hear the inner thoughts of Thomas Black Bull. Tom wants 'to be a rider' to help destroy his past. He believed 'the old way is finished' until one day he says to himself 'I have forgotten who I am'. This book allows you to really understand what the character is thinking. I did not personally enjoy reading this book. I believe this book drags on too much. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand the importance of respecting your heritage and the mistreat of indians.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2001

    A disappoinment by Hal Borland

    In When the Legends Die, Hal Borland writes about a young indian boy, Tom Black Bull, trying to perseverve through the discrimanation he suffers and trying to find his identity and heritage. Borland does a good job of drawing out these themes through the words and actions of the characters in the story. Red uses words such as 'And they all wind up broke. Especially if they are Indians or Mexes.' to discrimanate and control Tom. Several events through the book cause Tom to think about 'forgetting even his own identity'. I did not like this book personally because it drags on at times and the ending was not very good or realistic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2001

    The Tragedy of An Indian life shown by Hal Borland

    In'When the Legends Die' by Hal Borland show what it was like to be an Indain in the early 1900's. He tells us how hard it is to be a 'young indian boy' like Tom Black Bull and finding your true identity when 'torn between two worlds' of the old ways and the new ways. The mean reason I like the story is because it shows how indians live in the old days and how difficult to be a child with no parents in the world. Also like the way he rides in the rodeos, and I recommend this book to anyone who likes the wild west and how Cowboys really lived back then. It also shows how Indians were mistreated wether they lived on the reservation or work with other. Tom was bosed around like a slave and threatened by everone. It started when they forced him to live in the city because his family got off the reservation with out a permant.

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