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Where White Men Fear to Tread: The Autobiography of Russell Means

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2004

    Russell Means : A Man of honor and integrity

    As a white man, I am ashamed to say the first time I heard of Russell Means was when I saw 'Last of the Mohicans'. I thought he was a full-time actor. That compelled me to buy the book 'Where White Men Fear To Tread'. After reading the book, I respect and admire Mr. Means for what he is doing on behalf of his people. Fighting the U.S. Government after decades of oppression has given me a great deal of respect for Mr. Means and the Indian nation in general. Continued success to Mr. Means for the fight for freedom and respect for his people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2002

    Powerful, Insightful and well written...

    "Where White Men Fear to Tread" is a book that will stand alone in my heart as one of the best books I have ever read. It was given to me by a fellow member of the Native American Church while I was attending in New Mexico. I felt the urge to read, read and read more as my eyes took in his words! I would carry it everywhere. It gave me so much insight as to how Russell Means grew up, all the conflicts he had to deal with and all the lies he was told. The part about the Fort Laramie treaty and how the government took the land back from the Lakotas, Nakotas and Dakota is disgraceful in my eyes. Then they have the nerve to call us Indian givers. This book will open up your eyes to what really happens outside your prefect world. It is time for a wake up call. Also in closing I would like to say my hopes and prayers are to Russell on his path to become Governor of New Mexico. This book shall breath life into you and make you smile, shake your head in understanding and shake your fist at the way the government treats the Native Americans. Mitaku Oyasin

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2002

    A True Warrior

    The 500+ pages of this book appear intimidating at first, but this is a book that is hard to stop reading. I bought this book after visiting the Pine Ridge Reservation. Means paints a vivid portrait of life on the reservation. The 1973 conflict with the federal government at Wounded Knee is probably the highlight of the book. Means has been shot three times, stabbed, and has been in countless fights for his beliefs. He is a man who walks the walk, which is rare these days.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2001

    Incredible,Informative, Powerful

    So the critics say, Russell Means is only in it for attention? They say, his historical facts are all wrong? And I guess your history is perfect...I guess Columbus discovered America. I guess Russell Means didn't get stabbed, shot at, beaten, jailed in the 70s for causes, but because he wanted attention. What happened to intelligent critics, there are none, that's why they have jobs as critics. Read this book yourself and you will find the passion of one man who has stood up for his family, his people, and his beliefs. You will learn a lot about life, spirtuality, American History, and Justice. To me, I learned a lot from this book regarding the Government, World Culture, and Sprituality. This is a great book about an activist. So what if he acts in movies? So what he seeks attention, he has a very important cause that needs attention. You will notice that the crtics don't mention Means's TREATY schools, and other organziations he has started and works with.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2000

    A Man of Integrity

    Russell Means' book is an eye-opening account of the injustices suffered by American Indians, even today. Unfortunately, because the media rarely chronicles reservation life, few of us know what Means calls 'American Apartheid.' Oh, well: 'Out of Sight, Out of Mind' is too prevalent an attitude in America.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    It is unfortunate that I only read this book after Mr. Means pas

    It is unfortunate that I only read this book after Mr. Means passing last year. a remarable tome about life for the Naitve American. A must eead for those who wish more of thestruggles of the American Indian in the latter half of the 20th century, a struggle that continues today.

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