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Where the Wild Things Were: Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

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  • Posted November 16, 2009

    This book is awesome

    I heard the author on NPR. Thought the book might be interesting. I was wrong, this book in unbelievable. It paints a clear and concise story of the complex interrelationships in the ecosystem and the importance of the predators. This book should be required reading for all students and should be read by all people interested in saving our planet.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 26, 2009

    Save the carnivores

    This is an informative, interesting, and disturbing account of the ecological impact of predator elimination. The author points out that some environmental problems commonly blamed on climate change may actually be the result of the loss of major predators in ecosystems. A particular point I found of concern is that what we today perceive to be wilderness is in truth an anemic vestige of once healthy ecosystems. Our standard for what we consider wild is sinking with potentially devastating consequences. This book provides a perspective on ecological issues not commonly covered in the popular press. I highly recommend you read this book if you care about the future of this planet.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2009

    Engrossing Read With Vivid Descriptions

    Started out a little slow but quickly became engrossing. Detailed descriptions conjured up vivid images. Broken into easily digestible components.
    I didn't like the cheap shot and sweeping generalizations towards outdoorsmen. He failed to recognize contributions by outdoorsmen in excess of $5.5 billion dollars since the institution of the Pittman-Robertson Act, and an estimated additional $750,000,000 a year in other conservation dollars. Without the conservation efforts of sportsmen and women over the last century there would likely be no place left for the apex predators to roam. One more clarification, last year hunters in Pennsylvania harvested twice as many does as bucks so I guess they aren't all trophy hunters only willing to shoot a large buck as he suggested.
    Okay, my rant aside I enjoyed the book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2008

    An excellent resource that connects worldwide biodiversity decline with the loss of native carnivores

    'Where the Wild Things Were' is a profoundly thoughtful account of the importance of native carnivores - and the consequences that follow their loss. The book links together intriguing scientific stories around the world through researchers documenting the decline of ecosystems when they lose their top carnivores. Humans largely tend to misunderstand the critical role that these carnivores play in maintaining healthy biodiversity but, as public awareness grows, more can be done to help conserve these species. This book is a must read for high school and college biology students and anyone who wants to gain a better understanding of the importance of wildlife conservation. Suzanne Asha Stone, Northern Rockies Wolf Conservation Specialist, Defenders of Wildlife.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Tatum the hostes of the show

    Hi

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 21, 2009

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    Posted January 26, 2012

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    Posted March 11, 2011

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    Posted March 6, 2011

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