Customer Reviews for

The White Tiger

Average Rating 4
( 186 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(63)

4 Star

(63)

3 Star

(29)

2 Star

(21)

1 Star

(10)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

The White Tiger

Aravind Basu's brilliant debut is a tale of suspense and questionable morality which takes you on an unexpected journey into the heart of India through Balram Halwal aka 'The White Tiger'.Born in the fictional village of Laxmangarh, near the famous village of Bodh Gaya,...
Aravind Basu's brilliant debut is a tale of suspense and questionable morality which takes you on an unexpected journey into the heart of India through Balram Halwal aka 'The White Tiger'.Born in the fictional village of Laxmangarh, near the famous village of Bodh Gaya, where Buddha attained enlightenment, Halwal is the son of a rickshaw puller. After seeing his father die a painful death, neglected by the hospital authorities, he is forced to drop out of school and ends up working in a tea shop wiping tables. All he dreams of is escape. He manages to find his way out of the dreaded tea shop when a rich village landlord hires him as a chauffeur for his son who has returned from the United States. Things change rapidly for Halwal when he has to move to the Indian capital New Delhi with his new master. Here he comes face to face with the two Indias: As Adiga aptly puts it: 'The dreams of the rich, and the dreams of the poor - they never overlap, do they? See, the poor dream all their lives of getting enough to eat and looking like the rich. And what do the rich dream of? Losing weight and looking like the poor.' Living in a big city with bright lights on the one hand and teeming poverty on the other, Halwal starts questioning many things he has taken for granted while growing up in his small village. Things get murky when his master attempts to frame him for an accidental murder committed by his wife. Halwal is forced to question his undying loyalty. His awakening eventually turns him into a successful entrepreneur. But does the road to success justify spilling blood? Read this riveting page-turned, written in epistolary form, to find out.

posted by Anonymous on May 11, 2008

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Disturbing look into one characters life in India

This was a book that was selected by my book club, not one that I would have chosen to read on my own. The author's intent was to bring to light some of the atrocities that seems to still exist today about life in India. The storytelling is a bit slow for my taste, so I...
This was a book that was selected by my book club, not one that I would have chosen to read on my own. The author's intent was to bring to light some of the atrocities that seems to still exist today about life in India. The storytelling is a bit slow for my taste, so I found myself easily distracted as I tried to read this book on my train commute. The main character is not very likable, and the overall story does not leave you feeling satisfied. This is not a book I enjoyed reading, and I would not recommend it to others.

posted by TrainTravelReader on April 13, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted August 3, 2014

    The White Tiger is the first novel by Indian author, Aravind Adi

    The White Tiger is the first novel by Indian author, Aravind Adiga. The narrative takes the form of a series of eight rambling emails sent over the period of a week from Balram Halwai aka Munna aka The White Tiger to Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao on the eve of his visit to India, and describes how Balram advanced from half-baked school boy son of a rickshaw puller to lowly teashop employee in Laxmangarh to chauffeur of rich Landlords in Delhi to fugitive wanted for the murder of his former employer to Bangalore entrepreneur. All this, under the guise of advising the Premier on producing much-needed entrepreneurs for China. Along the way, Balram comments on the divide in India between the rich and the poor, the powerful and the powerless, and details the bribery and corruption that are de rigeur in India. Adiga’s India is slums and sewage, shopping malls and traffic jams, call centres and cockroaches. As the main character, Balram is neither endearing nor wholly odious; in fact none of the characters will hold the reader’s interest for long. Some of Adiga’s descriptive prose is excellent, but this is not really enough to make this a “blazingly savage and brilliant” novel as described on the front cover. Winner of the Man Booker Prize for 2008, this is a pleasant enough read, at times blackly funny, but a far cry in quality from the works by those other Indian authors that won the Man Booker Prize in 1997 and 2006.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2010

    writing style excellent

    It is a scathing review of what India is all about (caste system, politics, how to get to the top, treatment of different people in different caste groups, etc.). It starts out with the main character, sometimes called The White Tiger, telling the premier of China in seven letters he wrote to the premier, he murdered someone. The rest of the story is his autobiography about how he started out, who he killed and why, how he got to the top, etc.. The main thing that ruined the book for me was that none of the characters had any redeeming qualities. The writing was excellent, and I enjoyed the history lesson of how India works. However, it is hard to totally enjoy a book when you have all characters with no redeeming qualities. This is why I only gave it three stars.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    The White Tiger

    A good read especially if you enjoy stories about foreign places and enjoy when the underdog prevails.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2011

    Inhuman circumstances

    I read this book because it won a Mann Booker prize and it is about India, a country that I have visited and am very interested in. However, I'm glad this isn't the India I visited. By the same token I think it was important to read this book to get an alternative perspective of the country by one who really knows it, but I found it to be a depressing experience. There is not one person in the book who is sympathetic and the protagonist is a scary empty soul. Inhuman circumstances lead to inhuman behavior (or very human behavior, one might say). Overall I regretted buying this book though I did finish it because I wanted to see what happened to him, but by about half way through I can't say I really enjoyed the experience and ultimately that is what reading is about for me. I read the author's notes at the end of the book and I understand that he presents a very realistic look at India. I also wonder if there isn't another India existing side by side with the one portrayed in this novel. The India I came to know in my (admittedly very cloistered) three week visit to the spiritual spots in India was quite different (thankfully) and that is the view of India I will retain.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 31, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A book that will make you question "How far would you go..."

    I enjoyed reading this book, and yet was dissapointed with it all at the same time. It is the story of an Indian Man telling his biography that deals with his struggle to survive and succeed in India. He starts off by stating that he is a murderer and then proceeds to describe his story and the events that lead up to the murder.

    It was interesting, because I have lived in India for a summer and found that what the main character was describing is very true. India is an eat or be eaten society, in which you have to be tough to survive and willing to sacrifice things that a normal person wouldn't imagine doing. So, it was exciting to read about the events leading up to the murder and it made me anticipate the event.

    But, I thought the book was a difficult book to get through and I never truly looked forward to reading it. I didn't dislike it, and I find it interesting to discuss but I wouln't want to read it again.

    Overall, I would only recommend it if you have been to Inda.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2010

    The White Tiger

    This was a book selected for our book group to read and discuss. As usual, opinions were mixed, both about the ethical/moral issues raised by the story and characters--and the comments about enjoyment or not. From the standpoint of discussion, it was a good selection for the group--just for the differences of opinion, which made a lively and interesting conversation.

    The story is set in India--as the reader watches the protagonist advance from his country/village beginning to becoming a successful (in his eyes) businessman. The journey to the top, as he describes it, included murdering his employer. A dark picture of Indian society/caste system and the Indian people was presented by the author--and this was one of the points of difference and discussion in our group. Such a pessimistic and unpleasant view of a people--we felt--could not be representative of a culture, but a snapshot of a portion of it.

    It is a book worth reading, in particular for groups.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    dark humor, exaggerated situations.

    i read it for a book club. wouldn't have chosen it otherwise.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2