Customer Reviews for

Who Moved My Cheese?: An A-Mazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

Entertaining Lesson

A short story about 2 mice and 2 'little people' in a maze looking for cheese.

Of course 'cheese' is just a metaphor for what you want in life (such as money, the ideal job), and the 'maze' represents where you are looking for what you want (such as your famil...
A short story about 2 mice and 2 'little people' in a maze looking for cheese.

Of course 'cheese' is just a metaphor for what you want in life (such as money, the ideal job), and the 'maze' represents where you are looking for what you want (such as your family, an organization). As the story goes, one of the characters (Haw) learns to deal with change successfully and writes what he has learned on the maze wall. In this way, the reader gets the main points in the book and can learn too how to deal with life's changes.

A little book that is big on wisdom, many should find it entertaining and useful. Also recommended The Sixty-Second Motivator -another short story that is to the point and practical

posted by 247310 on October 27, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Everyday Workers Beware

Let's get right to the point. If your boss comes up to you one day and tells you that you should read this book (or even worse, hands you a copy), start looking for a new job. Because your days of peace of mind and security in the work place are over. The book is sma...
Let's get right to the point. If your boss comes up to you one day and tells you that you should read this book (or even worse, hands you a copy), start looking for a new job. Because your days of peace of mind and security in the work place are over. The book is small enough to be read over a lunch break (how convenient), with large print and lots of pictures that look like Sunday Comics rejects. You'll be better served grabbing the latest classifieds and circling new employment possibilities while you finish off your meal. The book uses a simple metaphorical story about two 'rats' (workers) who go to the 'same place everyday' (work) to get their 'cheese' (money). But one day, when some unseen person moves the 'cheese,' the rats are forced to do things they wouldn't normally do just to get the same reward they've been getting all along. Any middle of the road worker who has ever had to work twice as hard after an episode of 'corporate downsizing' just to get the same amount of money out of his paycheck (or even worse, keep his job) should be able to relate. This choice of metaphorical characters should tell you everything you need to know about what the author (and the corporate executives of America) think about the middle of the road American worker. They don't care about the well being of their employees. Your boss will tell this book is about change, and how to accept it in your life and in the workplace. And to an extent that's true. If you want to believe that change is inevitable, there's nothing you can do about it, and you're willing to let your boss bully you around until he decides that some one half your age can do your job half as well as you're already doing it for half the price, you'll fit right in to the environment your employer is trying to create. Because to them, you're just a pawn. And if you don't do exactly what they say (or if they just get tired of looking at you, whichever comes first) they'll take your share of the cheese and give it to some other 'rat.' It¿s sad to think how simplistic this book is. Even a child could read it. Parents who are stupid enough to enjoy this book can start brainwashing their kids early on in life, so when it¿s time for them to enter the workforce they¿ll think being mistreated in the workplace is perfectly normal and even acceptable.

posted by Anonymous on January 5, 2004

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Entertaining Lesson

    A short story about 2 mice and 2 'little people' in a maze looking for cheese. <BR/><BR/>Of course 'cheese' is just a metaphor for what you want in life (such as money, the ideal job), and the 'maze' represents where you are looking for what you want (such as your family, an organization). As the story goes, one of the characters (Haw) learns to deal with change successfully and writes what he has learned on the maze wall. In this way, the reader gets the main points in the book and can learn too how to deal with life's changes. <BR/><BR/>A little book that is big on wisdom, many should find it entertaining and useful. Also recommended The Sixty-Second Motivator -another short story that is to the point and practical

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2004

    Everyday Workers Beware

    Let's get right to the point. If your boss comes up to you one day and tells you that you should read this book (or even worse, hands you a copy), start looking for a new job. Because your days of peace of mind and security in the work place are over. The book is small enough to be read over a lunch break (how convenient), with large print and lots of pictures that look like Sunday Comics rejects. You'll be better served grabbing the latest classifieds and circling new employment possibilities while you finish off your meal. The book uses a simple metaphorical story about two 'rats' (workers) who go to the 'same place everyday' (work) to get their 'cheese' (money). But one day, when some unseen person moves the 'cheese,' the rats are forced to do things they wouldn't normally do just to get the same reward they've been getting all along. Any middle of the road worker who has ever had to work twice as hard after an episode of 'corporate downsizing' just to get the same amount of money out of his paycheck (or even worse, keep his job) should be able to relate. This choice of metaphorical characters should tell you everything you need to know about what the author (and the corporate executives of America) think about the middle of the road American worker. They don't care about the well being of their employees. Your boss will tell this book is about change, and how to accept it in your life and in the workplace. And to an extent that's true. If you want to believe that change is inevitable, there's nothing you can do about it, and you're willing to let your boss bully you around until he decides that some one half your age can do your job half as well as you're already doing it for half the price, you'll fit right in to the environment your employer is trying to create. Because to them, you're just a pawn. And if you don't do exactly what they say (or if they just get tired of looking at you, whichever comes first) they'll take your share of the cheese and give it to some other 'rat.' It¿s sad to think how simplistic this book is. Even a child could read it. Parents who are stupid enough to enjoy this book can start brainwashing their kids early on in life, so when it¿s time for them to enter the workforce they¿ll think being mistreated in the workplace is perfectly normal and even acceptable.

    8 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2001

    One Character Short

    Although this book addresses four different reactions to change and is primarily addressing business situations, it claims to be for aspects of life outside of business as well and in this regard falls one character short. The character missing is the one who asks 'Who cares who moved the cheese, why don't we get out of this maze?' The assumption that we must be in this maze is never questioned by any of the characters. In this light the book is a good example of propaganda for capitalism, but not a good challenge to think 'outside the box', or, in this case, the maze.

    7 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2003

    I found the author's tone condescending...

    I didn't appreciate the simplistic child like analogy...it just feeds into current poor management trends. But I did "see the handwriting on the wall", and left the company that required we all read it.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2000

    I didn't like it.

    I am a teacher and was required to read this book for staff development. I found it to be somewhat offensive. The overall feel I got from reading this is 'sit down, shut up, and quit your moaning'. I don't think that's an effective way to deal with change.

    6 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2001

    Rats in a corporate maze

    I'm glad I didn't buy this book with my own money. My copy was given to me by 'unnamed company' and it did nothing to improve morale. It actually made our employee outlook even worse. The analogy is degrading. The message I got from the book is to accept poor management with unfocused goals, do what you are told, and be happy with where the powers-that-be move your cheese. Change is inevitable, but this message stinks. What good points were made in the book only highlighted the fact that 'unnamed company' didn't do these things for the employees.

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2009

    Waste of Money

    This book may very well be the stupidest book a human has ever written. It is condescending and an enormous rip-off. It certainly does not even come close to deserving the praise given to it. The reviewers must have felt such immense relief to finally finish the book, that it skewed their judgment.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2006

    Treats You Like A Mouse In A Corporate Maze

    This has got to be the most over-hyped book in history. Why has it sold so many copies? Corporations buy it in bulk and hand out thousands of copies to employees because 'Who Moved My Cheese?' tells employees to not question authority and happily accept any change that comes along. The parallel between mice trapped in a maze and employees stuck in cubicles is striking. When change comes it's not anyone's fault, certainly not anyone in authority, so the best way of dealing with it, advises Dr. Johnson, is to look at the bright side, scurry off to find new cheese and --- oh, yes --- LAUGH at yourself. So the next time downsizing leaves you demoted or out on the street, or a new compensation plan mysteriously cuts your wages, don't forget to laugh at yourself. Just the way management is laughing at you, little mouse.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2002

    This is NOT process improvement

    This book is all about how the individual needs to change in order make things better. The entire book runs counter to the process improvment movement. Rather than blaming the individual for their lack of ability and/or desire to change, the organization should be looking at system issues. If the system is broken the individual will not have the willingness or even the ability to change. This book does a disservice to the individual by placing blame (It is your fault you have decided not to go in search of the cheese) rather than encouraging group problem solving.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2002

    Supporting a Nation of SHEEP

    This book is GARBAGE! It is overly simplistic and is grossly misunderstood and used as a tool to avoid treating people with respect. Remember the Disney film 'The Lion King' when Poombah, the warthog, declares 'You've got to put your past behind you'....that's the philosophy here. Disregard anything bad that happens and let it go...it is past history. According to this book, the employees and stockholders of Enron and WorldCom should not waste time asking 'why' and just move onto finding the next source of cheese. How convenient for the people who are responsible for those messes.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2001

    Who ReMoved My Execllence?

    ---If the Cheese Book had been passed around Washington's troops the winter Washington crossed the Potomac.--- The colonies would all be saluting the Union Jack today. --- Not one continental soldier would have responded to the speech Washington had read to his men. --- The words, 'These are the times that try men's souls'--- would have been unheeded by the freezing troops. They would have all been scurrying around looking for the fastest way home. --- Americans would all be saluting the Union Jack today. Hail, Britannia! ---In this tale, I could find no impulse to better conditions? ---Nor could I see where it show that one person can make a difference? ---Nor could I see striving for excellence or even the potential for excellence? ---While cute on the surface, I found the story degrading. Setting 'little men' trapped in a Skinner box competing with rodents of equal size for the same survival niche may project a popular view of the world. Unfortunately, that Weltanschauung is not a productive one for bettering the human condition. ---I have found that part of what makes men civilized that they can choke down their fight or flight instincts and carry on with a cause when times get tough? ---This little story plants the subliminal seeds of defeatism. It is a world of little victims that have to figure out how to look out after their own skins. Clearly the way to survive is to be more like rodents. ---This story may not be an excellent tool in softening up employees for lay off if that is your objective as it appears to lower morale. ---As that is how it is appears in the context of required reading at the site of one of my clients. ---The feedback I get is that the story is making them feel stupid for having attempted being ¿TEAM PLAYERS. Being Team Players has always been the management mantra up until the required reading arrived. ---Team players are supposed to look past their own personal interests in the pursuit of the overall team objective? --- Team play includes potentially sacrifice in the achievement of a goal? ---In counterpoint this little tale forwards a world of fair weather friends and sunshine patriots. Where team players are suckers, and loyalty is to be scoffed at. Or at least that is the feedback that I have gotten. I took it the same way. ******An uninspiring morale breaker *******

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2000

    Residue from the Reagan years in a cute new package...

    Given the basic argument of the text, I believe that 'Bend-over for corporate downsizing,' would be a more accurate title. Give this book to let your employees know how little they actually matter.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2000

    What Well-Publicized Trash!

    'Who Moved My Cheese?' is very disappointing with respect to the price to poor quality book production ratio, the silly, kindergarten-like drawings and the banal nature of the author's message. It seems that certain readers, who praised this book as a panacea for changes in one's personal life, have unfortunately missed the point. This book was obviously written to excuse the callous changes, which managers impose on the workplace. After all,as listed in the book, it is endorsed by managers from more than 70 corporations. As such, this book is abominable. The degrading manner in which employees are threatened with change or loose your jobs and are portrayed as simple brained mice or 'littlepeople' is highly objectionable, insulting and shameful! Let's brush aside this well-publicized, biased trash. If you would like to read a really entertaining, hilarious book about the workplace and see, for a change, what those 'littlepeople' think about management follies and 'vices', then the American satire 'Management by Vice' by C.B. Don, is highly recommended instead!

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    Please...

    My workplace required this book to be read by all of us mice after they moved our cheese. What they did was lower our pay and added more responsibilities to our jobs. At the same time they restructured and fired all those that were not pulling their weight or voiced their opinions. As a scare tactic perhaps? Its a book that tries to make you understand change and to deal better with changes that you have no control over. Did it help? Not really! I'm still bitter but I have a job...yea me.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2009

    This book should be in schools -- Grade Schools to College

    The ideas are put in such a simple way that they are easy to understand.. they are life changing and/or enabling.. it gives a person the capability to live with change even a life altering change .. without feeling like your giving up your values or lowering your standards.. it makes dealing with change acceptable and it is not focused on any individual political, medical, spiritual or other issue.. it is truly generic.. it is a good primer on how to deal with a changeable world and not become bogged down by it.. and it should be read and re-read at differnt life stages...

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2005

    Are you kidding me?

    I HAD to read this book for my management position at the largest corporation in the world. It really helped me understand that I was working for IDIOTS. How depressing is it when one educates himself, excels into management, and then is required to read a picture book that made me feel like a RAT that should not think for one's self? These types of books are bought in bulk by many major corporations to distribute to their peons with the hope that you will 'buy into' the 'be flexible' concept and do what your told. I could sum the book up in one sentence: Don't question your superiors if you don't want your paycheck (cheese) to move. G-d forbid senior management actually managed their people instead of handing them this book as a panacea for bad morale.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2002

    You've got to be kidding!

    Sorry, but the authors have taken an old sales training story - and wrapped Bob and Carol, Ted and Alice around it. The concept is condescending and lame. Really I'm jealous - I've got to come up with some simplistic scam that will catch the minisecond attention span of the airport reader.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2001

    Zero stars would be more befitting

    This is a trite allegorical that was written for corporations to hand out to their Baby Boomer employees to rattle their cages and warn them about their impending replacements. Subterfuge against labor organizations and unions. No hemming and hawing about it: this is a cheesy little hard bound pamphlet that stinks. But, if you like to be condescended to, it may be right up your little maze-like alley!

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2010

    Stating the obvious.

    This book was recommended to me as a very inspiring book geared to those unhappy in their current careers. I however found no inspiration whatsoever and am totally confused at the high ratings this book recieves.

    This entire book, written in a childlike, condescending manner, completely states the obvious, offers no inspiration, doesn't give any helpful tips, and you could basically see where this book was going after about the first page. I found myself rolling my eyes many times during the quick and dumbed down read.

    Yes I know I need to "find new cheese" when it starts to disappear and that the "cheese" isn't going to magically re-appear. Yes I know it takes hard work, dedication and it isn't always going to be easy. Isn't that what we are taught from a very early age. But reading a ridiculous book about mice running through a maze wearing track suits and sneakers tied around their necks while they find rooms of cheese is not helping me in my quest to find work that I love, or, despite that fact that I know I need to, inspiring me to get out there into that so called maze. The only thing this book did for me was wish I had spent my money on something else. On the other hand I can see this book helpful in teaching young children about what lies ahead for them in the working world.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    Great Book

    I was first introduced to this book by one of my employees. I had just become the Training Manager for my company and was having a hard time dealing with all the overwhelming changes. My employee told me to read it. It was given to her when she graduated college. I make reference to the changes that were occuring because that is what this book was meant for. It was meant to help those deal with change. Although the book is a fast read (it took me a whole hour to read it), it keeps you intrigued to find out what happens. It gave me forsight on how to deal with change and not to be afraid of change. I now have given the book to all of my friends who have had to deal with a life changing event. I have given it to those who are afraid to make a leap in life because of the changes that may occur. If anything, this book will turn on a light bulb and give you a little help on managing the changes in your life that you are afraid to accept. Enjoy!

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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