Customer Reviews for

Who Moved My Cheese?: An A-Mazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life

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(188)

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(16)

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(45)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

Entertaining Lesson

A short story about 2 mice and 2 'little people' in a maze looking for cheese.

Of course 'cheese' is just a metaphor for what you want in life (such as money, the ideal job), and the 'maze' represents where you are looking for what you want (such as your famil...
A short story about 2 mice and 2 'little people' in a maze looking for cheese.

Of course 'cheese' is just a metaphor for what you want in life (such as money, the ideal job), and the 'maze' represents where you are looking for what you want (such as your family, an organization). As the story goes, one of the characters (Haw) learns to deal with change successfully and writes what he has learned on the maze wall. In this way, the reader gets the main points in the book and can learn too how to deal with life's changes.

A little book that is big on wisdom, many should find it entertaining and useful. Also recommended The Sixty-Second Motivator -another short story that is to the point and practical

posted by 247310 on October 27, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

Everyday Workers Beware

Let's get right to the point. If your boss comes up to you one day and tells you that you should read this book (or even worse, hands you a copy), start looking for a new job. Because your days of peace of mind and security in the work place are over. The book is sma...
Let's get right to the point. If your boss comes up to you one day and tells you that you should read this book (or even worse, hands you a copy), start looking for a new job. Because your days of peace of mind and security in the work place are over. The book is small enough to be read over a lunch break (how convenient), with large print and lots of pictures that look like Sunday Comics rejects. You'll be better served grabbing the latest classifieds and circling new employment possibilities while you finish off your meal. The book uses a simple metaphorical story about two 'rats' (workers) who go to the 'same place everyday' (work) to get their 'cheese' (money). But one day, when some unseen person moves the 'cheese,' the rats are forced to do things they wouldn't normally do just to get the same reward they've been getting all along. Any middle of the road worker who has ever had to work twice as hard after an episode of 'corporate downsizing' just to get the same amount of money out of his paycheck (or even worse, keep his job) should be able to relate. This choice of metaphorical characters should tell you everything you need to know about what the author (and the corporate executives of America) think about the middle of the road American worker. They don't care about the well being of their employees. Your boss will tell this book is about change, and how to accept it in your life and in the workplace. And to an extent that's true. If you want to believe that change is inevitable, there's nothing you can do about it, and you're willing to let your boss bully you around until he decides that some one half your age can do your job half as well as you're already doing it for half the price, you'll fit right in to the environment your employer is trying to create. Because to them, you're just a pawn. And if you don't do exactly what they say (or if they just get tired of looking at you, whichever comes first) they'll take your share of the cheese and give it to some other 'rat.' It¿s sad to think how simplistic this book is. Even a child could read it. Parents who are stupid enough to enjoy this book can start brainwashing their kids early on in life, so when it¿s time for them to enter the workforce they¿ll think being mistreated in the workplace is perfectly normal and even acceptable.

posted by Anonymous on January 5, 2004

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2005

    Absolutely Horrible

    Worst book I ever read. How it became a bestseller is the true mystery.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2005

    Feel like I'm 5!

    I see the point of this book... I couldn't wait to read it because its #1... I hated it! Yeah, the morals are good, but as an adult, I felt like a Kindergartener reading a story... way to elementary!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2004

    Insults your intelligence

    If you like books that read like they are talking to a six year old and need life's simple lessons spoon fed to you, check out this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2004

    Less than '...Amazing...'

    This book is a waste of time and money. The '...Amazing Way To Deal With Change...' is insultingly obvious. If you have the analytical ability of a squirrel you know the importance of being honest with yourself and that change is inevitable. How on earth is that '...Amazing...'?? If I could I would rate this book with NO stars.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2003

    You got five minutes................to waste

    The story was just interesting enough to avoid a single star rating. The author made me feel like if this wasn't life altering to me than I didn't get it. Well I got it, I just didn't need to spend 20 bucks on a kids book to figure out the obvious. I can't believe this story will be helpful to most people. If curiosity gets the better of you and you feel you must read this book then go to the library. This book is a quick read and is more useful as a fire starter or compost for your garden.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2003

    A First Reaction...

    My company recently did an exercise based on this book. What seemed clear to me was....If you strip away the frills and really study the concept, essentially what the 'cheese' concept tells us is to not question change; That all change is beneficial; That we (the rank and file) can not do anything about these changes. So, for all of you thinking of buying the 'cheese' book, I recommend you first purchase and read Orwell's 1984. Perhaps you will have a better perspective on the subject after that.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2003

    Microwave Management - Quickly consumed and easily forgotten!!

    Over-simplistic rhetoric that spews cliches everybody knows (Change is good; Everything happens for a reason; A blessing in disguise; Variety is the spice of life; Etc.etc.) The book suggests that the best way to handle you loss of 'Cheese' is to react and run aimlessly back into the maze (as the mice did). The book implies that questioning change and the authority that instituted the change is bad. Your best hope is to mimic the mice by using trial and error, even if you cover the same sections of the maze that provided you with no prior benefit. It amazes me that people find this book to be to be 'inspirational' and 'life-altering', since I felt personally insulted after reading this cookie-cutter trash. I guess these people can be easily duped and enjoy being doormats to authority. As a corporate motivational tool, the book implies that managers don't owe their employees any explanation for change nor have any responsibility if the change is inappropriate or backfires. Employers who use this book to educate their subordinates contradics a corporation's belief that its strength is in its people. If I could give this book zero stars, I would. Save your money - It's not even worth using as toilet paper.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2002

    Who Expropriated the Peoples' Cheese?

    A metaphor for the Enron/Worldcom generation of managers. Shows managers how not to worry and focus on exploiting their current situation without contributing anything, all the while searching for their next opportunity. Simplistic, but has obvious curb appeal for managers who are poor leaders. Sends the message 'get along by going along.' None of the characters in the book show a shred of leadership. I can hard think of a worse example I would want people to follow.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2002

    ONE star is way too much for this book

    I'm so glad that I didn't pay for this book. Very poor work, basic message...change is inevitable...there you go...save your $20 and get a real book. Do not give this as a gift...very lame present!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2001

    Mindless Drivel!

    Ok, let's get some facts straight here.... First: Change is good. Actually, that depends on the person and the type of change. If you are unhappy with your job, does that mean that quitting and changing is a good thing? NO! In today's society, it is not easy to change jobs, let alone vocations. In most instances, that job is the one thing that is sustaining a family, and giving it up for the sake of change could result in more harm than good. Second: Change is bad: Again, this depends on the situation. When I wrote Strike Hard ..., it signaled a change in my life, and the life of my family. Was it bad? Absolutely not! No one has been harmed by this, and many people have been able to benefit from it. (people gain enjoyment from reading it, my publisher sells it, etc.) It has had a resounding effect of changing my life, but for the better. All in all, I would agree with some of the other reviews on here and recommend that you not waste your money. There is nothing in this that isn't learned from living your life day-by-day. It has been mentioned that some employers are requiring this to be reading material of employees. In that case, I would recommend a change---a change of employers.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2001

    Cheesy money maker

    A good parable is one with multiple levels of meaning that gets richer the more it is pondered. A good parable reveals wisdom: profound truths that are simple, yet easily overlooked. This is a mediocre parable at best, with a message that didn't seem particularly enlightening: 'people must adapt to change to succeed'. It could have been told as well in a few pages.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2001

    A story worthy of perhaps a lone paragraph...

    The 'parable' is cute, but the lesson is painfully obvious. Adapting to change is better than staying in an impossible situation. There, I just save you at least $12! Please do not waste your money on this book- I read it in ten minutes standing in the bookstore. The font is large, each page has two inch margins top and bottom, and every few pages there is a full-page illustration. In essence, this is a two-page anecdote, fluffed up and filled with redundant passages, to fill a mere 94 pages. This book is a marvel of marketing--how to take the flimsiest of ideas and make tons of money- and therein lies the true lesson.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2001

    From Simple To Simple-Minded

    More like an amazing way to separate gullible Americans from their money! The One Minute Manager was simple. It may have been over-simplified. But it made a simple point in a useful way. There was action you could take day-to-day. This time Spencer J. falls flat on his face with a tortured parable that meanders on and on to end up with a strained 'cheesey' metaphor. It will be shrewdly promoted, as ever, and make SJ a lot more money. But shame on him. It isn't worth one tenth of the ridiculous, inflated price - even after B&N discounts it generously. Skip this one and spend your book dollars more wisely.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2000

    A good book for a grade school child

    First of all, this book is way to expensive for it's content. Second, I was offended by the 'See Dick run' size of the print and the pictures that were drawn as if by a child. The message in the book is everything you have already heard if you ever worked for a decent size corporation. Please leaf through this book before purchasing. You may just be able to finish it in a bookstore in about an hour or two.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2000

    Piece of crap...

    Literature??? HA!!! Ok, it is printed on paper... However, if one gets so stressed about the displacement of milk products, then seek counseling. Please. Move my cheese... Come on... I've had girlfriends with augmentations that would move a Wisconsin block to California... Get real.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2000

    Don't give this out thinking you have communicated

    As you can see by the reviews, people react violently and unpredictably to this book -- either very positively or very negatively. I was insulted. Don't give this book out to a group thinking you have communicated.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2000

    Cheezy Trash

    This book changed my life allright. The leadership of my company thought it was MAO's red book for management. Unfortunately employees were viewed as expendabe RATS and four fifths of our division was forced to retire or was put on layoff. Prior the layoff many of our managers touted 'Moved My Cheese' as required reading as to our company's philosophical direction. Ironically since I've 'retired' I have embraced change not because of the book but inspite of it! Bottom Line: would have been better rated if written for children rather than management.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2000

    The Cheese, as Analyzed by Dostoevsky's Mouse

    Ahem... If I may say so, your average paperback romance is written more eloquently than <i>Who Moved My Cheese,</i> and is probably also considerably more profound. If you've ever wanted someone to very, very slowly remind you of everything you already know, in elementary school terms, you will love this book. Otherwise, you will probably mutter something derogatory about your high-school guidance counselor and wander away.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2000

    Moldy

    If you are seeking self-help books that teach coping with change, buy a book other than this. This book teaches blind compliance rather than providing tools for effective change management. It treats the reader like a child in both form and substance. It is condescendingly written and uses giant fonts and plenty of white space to fill it¿s 100-pages. No one should waste his/her money on this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2000

    Who Wrote This Cheeseball?

    This was the worst book I've ever read--insulting to my intelligence and that of my coworkers. The fact that our company made us read it just prior to laying off 70% of the staff only added insult to injury. Think of it as a giant red flag--if upper management embraces this cheeseball, it's time to find a better maze.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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