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Who's Your Caddy?: Looping for the Great, Near Great, and Reprobates of Golf

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted February 27, 2011

    My Caddy Better Not Be Him!

    Who's Your Caddy by Rick Reilly is a nonfiction book about Rick caddying for professional golfers. Throughout the book, Rick makes many mistakes that end up embarrassing him in front of thousands of people on the course, and millions of viewers at home. Rick decides to first take his skills at the Masters, one of the most watched and popular golf tournaments. Rick get yelled at for silly mistakes he makes such as raking a bunker incorrectly and being publicly humiliated in front of thousands. Rick also receives tips from fellow caddies and is also heckled by some of the caddies. For instance, caddies tell Rick that on hole 14, from center fairway is was 210 yards to the green when in reality it was 150 yards causing him to get yelled at yet again. Rick eventually gets better at caddying knowing all the dos and don'ts on the golf course, and really gets to know some of the people he gets to caddy for. He also transforms as a man, learning that if he applies himself he can do almost anything. Major themes in this book are to never give up, learn from your mistakes, and don't become discouraged and keep your head up high. It was important for Rick to do all of these in order to reach his goal of having enough information to write his book, become the best caddy he possibly could and learn from everything he did wrong, and it was important for him to not give up after he made mistakes and keep his head high in order to achieve his goals. In this book, I really enjoyed all of the humor that he used and some of the comical things he did on the golf course, the way he put things into perspective for golfers such as me, and how he actually gave me a few pointers for my golf game and caddying skills. Things I did not like about the book is that I didn't understand some of the golf terms he mentioned and he didn't go into as much detail as I had hoped when talking about what to do and not to do as a caddy. People should read this if they are into golf and understand golf jargon, otherwise stay away from this book. You can read more of Rick's writing in Sports Illustrated.

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  • Posted April 20, 2010

    RICK REILLY'S "WHO'S YOUR CADDY?" A PERFECT GIFT FOR GOLFERS

    I'm old. My friends are old and someone is always having a knee or hip replaced and forced off the links for weeks at a time. This is the perfect gift for them. I always have three or four copies lying around to hand out as get well gifts. Reilly was for many years the essayist on the back page of Sports Illustrated. He is a very funny guy. In this book he has convinced a bunch of famous people - Jack Nicklaus, Tom Lehman, Donald Trump, Deepak Chopra and others - to let him carry their bag for a round. Hilarity ensues. I mean it. Hilarity. Laugh out loud funny is what this book is. If you don't howl at his recounting of his attempts to impress Lehman with his caddy prowess during a round with Bernhard Langer you are clearly dead.

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  • Posted May 22, 2009

    Excellent entertainment, excellent read!

    This was the 3rd Reilly book I have read and I have become a big fan of his writing. I thoroughly enjoy his style and wit that he adds to each chapter in this book. Anyone who loves the game of golf and/or loves watching the pros will enjoy this book. I highly recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2008

    Funny,Catchy, very interesting

    I found this book to be very funny and interesting. I really liked the format in which it is written. By having each story be about 6 pages long made it good to pick up for 20 minutes then put back down. If you like golf and Riley you will love this book. If you like golf but not Riley you will still enjoy this book. If you don't like golf and don't like Riley the Rachel Ray books are in the cooking section.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2005

    'Unbeleivibley funny'

    Rick riley shows a sense humor that i've never read before. His humor takes famous, and imfamous people lifes and show how funny they can be. In the case of Donald Trump he shoes how funny a multy billionare can be. Riley reveals how funny his could be stories are and how a billionare is treated in the every day life. The way he involves himself with the pros was really cool too, he showed how each of them is a nice, and genuine person and have more on there mind than their golf games. Riley in short wrote a book on each indivual person and what they go through, and have gone through. I love this book and say if you like golf and comedy you will love 'Who's your Caddy.'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2004

    Just Plain Fun

    This is one of the most enjoyable books ever written. A must read for any golfer. The chapter on John Daly alone was worth the price of the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2004

    A fun read

    this was a fun read but It wasn't great. Rick is funny at times in the book but who cares about caddying for some professional gambler that I've never heard of? I could see that he tried to get a good cross section of golfers to caddy for but it made for a rather boring book. Only three stories were worth reading having to do with John Daly (I'll admit it that I will never look at that man the same again), Jack Nicklaus, and Bob Newhart. The rest were forgettable. This is a book that you would let your friends read but they don't have to return it. You want them to read it for the funny parts but you don't like it enough to reccommend that your friends actually go out and buy it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    Reilly at his best

    Reilly does it again! I love all of his stuff but this is the best. I laughed from start to finish and laugh again just thinking about some of Reilly's caddying experiences.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2003

    An absolute must have!!

    Hilarious!!! I couldn't put it down. Any golfer will absolutely love it!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2003

    Funny Stuff!

    Nice light read -- Reilly uses his usual self-effacing humor to cover his exploits as a bag carrier for a variety of professional and amateur golfers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2003

    A treasure not to be missed

    <p>It's not often I get jealous of other writers, but it's not often that Rick Reillys come along. The umpteen-time Sportswriter of the Year winner graces the back page of Sports Illustrated with slice-of-life gems all the more admirable for the impact he is able to generate within the stifling confines of a severely word-limited format. Although he doubtless tires of hearing it, he is indeed the stylistic heir of the late, wondrously talented and insightful Pulitzer-prize winning sports columnist Jim Murray. Like that legend, Reilly concerns himself with the human side of sports and is endlessly curious about what goes on in the minds and hearts of athletes who are more typically presented to us by the mainstream media as cardboard-cutouts fashioned by front-office flaks. <p>If you read the 'Life of Reilly' column in SI as if it were dessert and you wish it were the main course instead, Who's Your Caddy? is your answer. To delve deeper into the psyches of golfers, Reilly cajoled a handful of them into letting him caddy for them, which is roughly akin to Yogi Berra helping you with your PhD thesis in linguistics. Yet, in the same way scientists often learn more from experiments gone wrong than the ones which succeed, the reactions of these players to the self-deprecating Reilly's sincere but fumbling attempts to do what looks so simple on television are especially illuminating. (Not to mention that you'll never again look at caddies in the same way.) Each of the chapters deals with a single golfer and reads like an extended one of his columns: The narrative pace is blistering and the key literary devices, as they were with Murray, are the howlingly funny and apt similes and metaphors. <p>Taking a lesson from the world of screenwriting, Reilly's preference is to show, not tell, and nowhere is this more in evidence than in the piece on Donald Trump, in which he uses lengthy, verbatim recitations from The Donald himself to prove the contention that nothing this business legend does or says is anything less than the best, the most, the highest and the greatest ever. Of all that's been written about Trump, nothing comes closer to conveying what it must be like to spend a few hours with him, and we even get a hint of an answer to the intriguing question of what Trump is like when he's alone: According to Reilly, he never is. It would seem that the man, like a quantum particle, has no objective existence of his own absent an observer. <p>While Reilly takes definitive and consistent points of view about his subjects (one wonders if Tom Lehman is truly a candidate for beatification), he nevertheless is usually honest enough to toss a monkey wrench into the batter even though it might undercut his basic premise. His portrait of John Daly's late-developing defiance in the face of his manifold weaknesses is compelling, but, despite knowing that our sympathy would likely devolve into something less tolerant, Reilly nevertheless describes for us a grotesque scene in which 'Long John' graphically justifies that ambiguous moniker in the back seat of a car. Reilly makes it sound funny, sort of, but it's undeniably depressing. <p>Passing up this book because you have no interest in golf or golfers would be like passing up Gulliver's Travels because you have no interest in giants. It's not about golf, it's about people, and golf is simply the vehicle for discovering them. While it's true that you can learn more about someone playing a single round of golf with him than you can living next door to him for six months, imagine caddying for him, as Reilly has. It's also about writing, and this author is a national treasure that anyone interested in language, craft and endless creativity owes it to himself to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2003

    I wish I had never read this book!

    It's a shame I read this book already. Now, I have no chance of going back through it and enjoying the outstanding group of stories he has collected in it for the first time again. I won't be able to laugh out loud with his description of the biggest gambler in Vegas or the whirlwind that is Donald Trump. I've been a religious Reilley reader for some time now, and would recommed that people be careful with this book. It is one of the few cover-to-cover reads you'll find out there.

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