Customer Reviews for

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations about Race

Average Rating 3.5
( 27 )
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(11)

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(4)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Enlightening

I found this book to be very informative, and very enlightening. It gave me a lot to think about, and I understand issues surrounding race and ethnicity much better now.

posted by Anonymous on July 12, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Very dissapointing. A shallow, biased look on racism

This book really disappointed me. I expected a deep look at racism, since I believe that racism is an awful problem and would like to understand it, but found a very shallow explanation. I found some interesting information, and I understand the sincere desire of the au...
This book really disappointed me. I expected a deep look at racism, since I believe that racism is an awful problem and would like to understand it, but found a very shallow explanation. I found some interesting information, and I understand the sincere desire of the author to change her world in a positive way, but I honestly believe that many of her opinions instead of leading to eliminating racism may lead to accentuate it. Remarks such as ¿all Whites, intentionally or unintentionally, benefit from racism¿, ¿People of color are not racist because they do not systematically benefit from racism¿, and many others, are pathetic. The author fails to acknowledge, or perhaps does not know, that racism exists and has existed for centuries, for millennia, all over the world, whenever the dominant group believes its race is superior to other races, and consequently mistreats the members of such other races. She seems to believe that racism was invented by wicked White Americans. Without examining the real reasons of racism, effective measures against it will very unlikely be found. The author says ¿..in an empowered sense or racial identity (Black people) make clear to others that their racial identity is important to them¿; ¿I can¿t remember the name of one White classmate¿, ¿even mature adults sometimes need to connect with someone who looks like them...¿. How is that good for Black people and not for White people? Using her advices, White people could be proud to surround themselves and their family only with others like them (White), which could be considered, precisely, racism. She should focus more in interesting information such as ¿race is a social construction that has little biological meaning¿, ¿there is no such thing as a ¿pure¿ race. All human populations are ¿mixed¿ populations'. If people do not learn to look beyond the color of the skin, if they are taught to stay with others who look just like them, racism will continue to exist.

posted by Anonymous on March 29, 2004

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2004

    Very dissapointing. A shallow, biased look on racism

    This book really disappointed me. I expected a deep look at racism, since I believe that racism is an awful problem and would like to understand it, but found a very shallow explanation. I found some interesting information, and I understand the sincere desire of the author to change her world in a positive way, but I honestly believe that many of her opinions instead of leading to eliminating racism may lead to accentuate it. Remarks such as ¿all Whites, intentionally or unintentionally, benefit from racism¿, ¿People of color are not racist because they do not systematically benefit from racism¿, and many others, are pathetic. The author fails to acknowledge, or perhaps does not know, that racism exists and has existed for centuries, for millennia, all over the world, whenever the dominant group believes its race is superior to other races, and consequently mistreats the members of such other races. She seems to believe that racism was invented by wicked White Americans. Without examining the real reasons of racism, effective measures against it will very unlikely be found. The author says ¿..in an empowered sense or racial identity (Black people) make clear to others that their racial identity is important to them¿; ¿I can¿t remember the name of one White classmate¿, ¿even mature adults sometimes need to connect with someone who looks like them...¿. How is that good for Black people and not for White people? Using her advices, White people could be proud to surround themselves and their family only with others like them (White), which could be considered, precisely, racism. She should focus more in interesting information such as ¿race is a social construction that has little biological meaning¿, ¿there is no such thing as a ¿pure¿ race. All human populations are ¿mixed¿ populations'. If people do not learn to look beyond the color of the skin, if they are taught to stay with others who look just like them, racism will continue to exist.

    4 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2005

    The blind leading the blind

    The crux of the matter is that the author uses the words ALL instead of MOST in her title. I have been a teacher in Schools for the past 30 years and found this author gets on the bandwagon of self pity and doing her best to make the 'whites' pay for the past, present and future. It's not a question of race but of CULTURE and the sooner the 'Black and White' extremists get that right the better. Not all black children sit together. Only those who feel comfortable coming from similar socio-economic and cultural backgrounds. A black child whose family engages in world culture appreciation would certainly not sit with a ghetto gangsta. This goes for Hispanic, as well as children from families with European backgrounds. You cannot force integration of cultures for the sake of your own unrealistic expectations of what is black and what is white. There is no person who is just Black and no person who is just White on this earth. There are just different cultures. Take a trip to Southern Africa and see for yourself. This is where affirmative action goes wrong. To hire a person just because of their skin color is being racist in reverse. To take it to extreme - you would not expect to hire a person just because they are Jewish (Semite), and a minority, to work in a Pork abbatoire. The sooner we understand different cultures and the strata of different socio-economic groups the better we will understand each other.

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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