Customer Reviews for

Why Christianity Must Change or Die: A Bishop Speaks to Believers in Exile

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

a voice crying in the wilderness

I've always liked Bishop Spong, mostly because his faith journey has been similar to mine. Not only that but we are trying to breathe new life into Christian doctrines that, in today's world, are becoming increasing unbelievable. After the discoveries of modern physics ...
I've always liked Bishop Spong, mostly because his faith journey has been similar to mine. Not only that but we are trying to breathe new life into Christian doctrines that, in today's world, are becoming increasing unbelievable. After the discoveries of modern physics and biology, as well as the horrors of the last century, the God of orthodox Christian theism--while continuing to be compelling for many--is still a hard sell for others. And it's this later group that Spong is writing for. He calls them 'believers in exile.' They have left the church or are silently sitting in the pews biting their tounges because they can't say the creed with conviction: the modern world has made it unintelligible. Yet these same people are still wanting to stand within the Christian tradition, if only it could make sense and be relevant to their lives. The old God, along with its doctrines, have no power over their lives, probably because of the infinite distance between the first century understanding of the world and a twenty-first understanding of it. Like many theologians who no longer stand in the 'orthodox' camp, Spong undertakes the task of re-defining Christian doctrines in the light of contemporary knowledge. God, Jesus, resurrection, the Christian life--all are given a new meaning. Yes, it may not look like the Christianity of old, but Spong is wrestling with the texts and traditions that have been handed down to him and, along with contemporary scientific knowledge, is trying to make Christianity believable for contemporary men and women who hunger for transcendence but who don't find it in the traditional paradigm.

posted by Anonymous on March 4, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

Just creating a new religion

Spong isn't trying to adapt Christianity, he's trying to create his own New Age, Politically Correct hodge podge of other faiths. To pretend to be a Christian yet to deny the resurrection and numerous other historical, Biblical events which demonstrate Jesus' divinity,...
Spong isn't trying to adapt Christianity, he's trying to create his own New Age, Politically Correct hodge podge of other faiths. To pretend to be a Christian yet to deny the resurrection and numerous other historical, Biblical events which demonstrate Jesus' divinity, is simply contradictory to the entirety of Scripture. Although he tries to use Scripture to support his claims, he takes most of it out of context and simply disregards the rest.

posted by Anonymous on May 19, 2003

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2002

    Here's a book for critics of Christianity

    This book suggests that Christianity conform to another religion: One in unity with all existing religions. This is not a new concept. Even Voltaire proposed similar ideas on changing Christianity to fit into a politically correct worldview or else facing the consequence of death. The premise if far-reaching and unsuccessful (historically). This book will cause doubt in the validity of Christianity but is a promising tool in the hands of critics of Christianity, especially since the subtitle suggests the author's Bishopric.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    False teacher

    The Bible is the truth and warns of people like him

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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