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Why Holiness Matters: We've Lost Our Way--But We Can Find it Again

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

A Must Read For Anyone

In a culture that is about appearance and power, Tyler Braun challenges that assertion and calls a generation back to holiness.

For most the idea of holiness has been lost and in some ways feels like it cannot return. This book is a challenge and call to return to ho...
In a culture that is about appearance and power, Tyler Braun challenges that assertion and calls a generation back to holiness.

For most the idea of holiness has been lost and in some ways feels like it cannot return. This book is a challenge and call to return to holiness and how to get back.

This book is a must read for anyone looking to be all that God has called them to be.

posted by kyle_reed on August 4, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Review of ¿ Why Holiness Matters¿ The Millennial generation is

Review of “ Why Holiness Matters” The Millennial generation is going to
rebel by behaving not worse, but better. (Millennials Rising, 2000) I
love this quote! I was born in 1981 so I barely squeak in as Millennial
but find that I identify for with this generation tha...
Review of “ Why Holiness Matters” The Millennial generation is going to
rebel by behaving not worse, but better. (Millennials Rising, 2000) I
love this quote! I was born in 1981 so I barely squeak in as Millennial
but find that I identify for with this generation than the Gen Xer’s who
preceded us. As I started chapter 1 I found myself identifying with
much of what Braun says about what is Holiness(a list of do nots) in
traditional Christianity in America. I was one who conformed to the
list(not really sure why) but I watch most of my peers just walk away
from the pursuit of Holiness all-together. I especially like his
attention to the issue of Purity and his focus on the obsession in our
culture with "experience" - I choose NOT to experience lots of
bad things as a young person and often felt left out b/c I was a
"prude" turns out that when you grow up missing out on all
that crap is BETTER. Thanks to Tyler for saying that instead of
glamorizing his sinful experiences as something to be repeated by
others. Holiness is a subject that needs to be talked about and
pursued. Im glad a young author is starting the conversation that way
it doesn't just seem like something "old people' value or believe
in. I want to re-read the book and see how I can use the areas he
discusses to help me become Holier, so that I can better honor God and
have a deeper walk with him. As I read this book I thought of a a
friend who desperately needs to hear Tyler's story. It' never too late
to turn and pursue Holiness with heart that is hungry for God, not the
praise of man.

posted by Anonymous on August 18, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2012

    Review of ¿ Why Holiness Matters¿ The Millennial generation is

    Review of “ Why Holiness Matters” The Millennial generation is going to
    rebel by behaving not worse, but better. (Millennials Rising, 2000) I
    love this quote! I was born in 1981 so I barely squeak in as Millennial
    but find that I identify for with this generation than the Gen Xer’s who
    preceded us. As I started chapter 1 I found myself identifying with
    much of what Braun says about what is Holiness(a list of do nots) in
    traditional Christianity in America. I was one who conformed to the
    list(not really sure why) but I watch most of my peers just walk away
    from the pursuit of Holiness all-together. I especially like his
    attention to the issue of Purity and his focus on the obsession in our
    culture with "experience" - I choose NOT to experience lots of
    bad things as a young person and often felt left out b/c I was a
    "prude" turns out that when you grow up missing out on all
    that crap is BETTER. Thanks to Tyler for saying that instead of
    glamorizing his sinful experiences as something to be repeated by
    others. Holiness is a subject that needs to be talked about and
    pursued. Im glad a young author is starting the conversation that way
    it doesn't just seem like something "old people' value or believe
    in. I want to re-read the book and see how I can use the areas he
    discusses to help me become Holier, so that I can better honor God and
    have a deeper walk with him. As I read this book I thought of a a
    friend who desperately needs to hear Tyler's story. It' never too late
    to turn and pursue Holiness with heart that is hungry for God, not the
    praise of man.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 27, 2012

    It was a privilege to be able to read Tyler's book and I found m

    It was a privilege to be able to read Tyler's book and I found myself
    resonating with a lot of the gaps in this generation's walk with Christ.
    Particularly in the first half of the book he captures the
    "behavioral gap" that young people are facing. They're
    struggling to find what motivates them to live like Christ instead of
    simply being told that they ought to. Tyler's transparency of his own
    personal struggle with the issue and his frequent references to the
    Scriptures are all fantastic.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 15, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Holiness is like the Christian version of greatness. Secular his

    Holiness is like the Christian version of greatness. Secular history
    records the achievements of great conquerors, scientists and other world
    changers. Christian history looks to giants of the faith: saints and
    martyrs. Notable historical figures have a variety of traits, which make
    them memorable while the Christian figures all share one important trait
    - they display holiness. Holiness is an intimidating idea. It sounds
    heavy and legalistic. Tyler does a fantastic job of bringing holiness
    down from the ethereal level to the practical. After reading his book I
    was encouraged as a Christian that becoming holy does not mean I have to
    join a monastery. Rather the changes required are intimately tied to our
    relationship with Christ – therefore the process is much more inviting
    than the term itself. Tyler Braun breaks down the book into eight
    chapters: Innocence, Wrath, Shame, Love, Values, Community, Mission, and
    Artistry. The break down is logical and works well as Braun moves
    towards a conclusion. He moves in and out of personal stories which
    gives the book a comfortable pace. Everything he says is supported well
    by Scripture, though this was not meant to be an intellectual/academic
    sort of work. My only complaint is that I had a hard time figuring out
    who his audience was meant to be. I know the work was aimed at
    Millennials, but it fluctuated between aiming at those in the church and
    those outside of it. Which is fine in theory but difficult in practice.
    At times I found myself skimming because the ideas the author was trying
    to simplify came out rather boring. At other times I found myself
    engaged by deeper points or more extensive explanations but I know my
    de-churched friends would have simply skimmed over those sections.
    Although a targeted book might have a smaller audience, it will be
    better received. All that is to say I do recommend the book. Chapter 8
    alone made up for the less desirable parts of the work. Tyler has an
    intimate understanding of what he is trying to say and says it well. The
    way he describes holiness is refreshing and necessary for a generation
    disenchanted with dry religion.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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