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Customer Reviews for

Wide Sargasso Sea

Average Rating 3.5
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(7)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Metaphor for colonialism

Mr. Rochester and Antoinette's relationship is symbolic of colonialism in the Caribbean. Rochester represents England while Antoinette represents the Caribbean who he colonizes and ultimately takes over, uses and exploits her and at the end, he discards her. He tries to...
Mr. Rochester and Antoinette's relationship is symbolic of colonialism in the Caribbean. Rochester represents England while Antoinette represents the Caribbean who he colonizes and ultimately takes over, uses and exploits her and at the end, he discards her. He tries to take away her identity by changing her name to one that she vehemently rejects. This is indicative of the renaming of slaves by slave owners. Antoinette does her best not to be deprived of probably the only thing she owns by resisting this: ¿Bertha is not my name. You are trying to make me into someone else, calling me by another name. I know that is obeah too.¿ Rochester uses his power over Antoinette as husband, man and Master. He attempts through emotional means, but in vain to change the Caribbean Creole Antoinette into the English Bertha.

The relationship between Annette and Mr. Mason is a foreshadowing of the events in Antoinette¿s future. Mr. Mason was captivated by Annette¿s beauty and like Rochester he did not take the time to know his wife¿s inner beauty. He does not listen to his wife¿s opinions concerning slave revolt, showing his authoritative English nature, where he believes in white superiority. He believes that the slaves are like harmless children, but is proven wrong when Coulibri Estate is set on fire. Due to his ignorance, Pierre, Annette¿s son who is mentally and physically disabled dies. This sends an already emotionally unstable woman, insane. Mr. Mason abandons all responsibility of Annette and Antoinette after the fire and sends her (Annette) to live with a black couple who allegedly humiliate and abuse her emotionally. Rhys shows the vulnerability of women in this novel and their naive emotional and physical dependence on men.

posted by HemaG on October 18, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Not what bn advertised

After purchasing what I thought was the nook book, I found that instead it was a study guide. Highly disappointed. Can't believe I am feeling ripped off by BN.

posted by BetsyPatel on December 28, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    Bought this for my Nook but received the study guide instead. B

    Bought this for my Nook but received the study guide instead. B & N needs to FIX this incorrect listing!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 28, 2011

    Not what bn advertised

    After purchasing what I thought was the nook book, I found that instead it was a study guide. Highly disappointed. Can't believe I am feeling ripped off by BN.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 25, 2012

    Yep. It's mislabeled for Nook. Wasted money.

    Yep. It's mislabeled for Nook. Wasted money.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2006

    Not for everyone

    If you read Jane Eyre, loved Jane Eyre, and are the kind of person who returns to it every few years, I wouldn't recommend this title. Mr. Rochester may not have been an ideal hero, but he is who Charlotte Bronte intended. She WANTED a mad-woman in the attic at Thornfield Hall, and Bronte was very much a feminist-I don't think it's necessary to villify the man in modern literature. I'm not a big fan of authors who take a well-loved classic and do with it what they will. I think it's a shame.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2000

    ick!

    I'm an AP English student and we studied Jane Eyre before Wide Sargasso Sea. I understand the connections, but I'm with the other reviewer who said that this book makes you feel like you're going crazy. I had to read it several times through in a limited time space to even begin to get a grasp on it. This book is much more effective if you understand Jane Eyre and if you are studying it in a Book Group. I would suggest getting a friend to read along with you and then discussing.. oh every page with them as you read. It is very difficult to get through and very confusing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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