Customer Reviews for

Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man's Soul

Average Rating 4
( 245 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(149)

4 Star

(41)

3 Star

(23)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(24)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

For troubled men and the women who love them.

I read this book during a troubled time in my marriage, and though I won't say this book saved my marriage it did go a long way to helping me understand my husband. I think every man who is struggling with connection or emotion should read this, and frankly every singl...
I read this book during a troubled time in my marriage, and though I won't say this book saved my marriage it did go a long way to helping me understand my husband. I think every man who is struggling with connection or emotion should read this, and frankly every single woman on the planet should read it in order to understand men a bit better. There is more to a man than most of us give them credit for!

posted by LycanGal on January 17, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Flawed theology and psychology

This is the worst thing I have read in five years (and I have to grade undergraduate research papers!). John Eldridge misquotes scripture, doesn't cite sources or have a bibliograpy, even though he quotes from other authors' works. His theology is extremely flawed espec...
This is the worst thing I have read in five years (and I have to grade undergraduate research papers!). John Eldridge misquotes scripture, doesn't cite sources or have a bibliograpy, even though he quotes from other authors' works. His theology is extremely flawed especially in that he attempts to humanize God. As a book for Christian reading, Wild At Heart should not be on anyone's bookshelf. And as a self-help book, it offers no real strategies for dealing with personal problems. Eldridge's supposed revealing insights seem to be mostly based on Hollywood cliches and popular culture. Even then, he doesn't really give any good advice on how to change one's life. If one wants to learn what God wants men to be, one should read the Gospels. If one wants to learn real strategies for dealing with personal problems, I would suggest Dr. M. Scott Peck's classic book The Road Less Traveled and its sequels. Don't waste your hard-earned time or money on Wild At Heart!

posted by Anonymous on February 28, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted January 23, 2009

    Author has own agenda

    I felt that the author decided what he wanted to say, then went looking for Biblical verses that (when taken out of context) might support his positions. He also chose some questionable "translations" in this effort.<BR/><BR/>I also did not like his constant use of absolutes: "always, never, each, every, never, must." John Eldredge believes that all men share his feelings and desires. A dangerous assumption.

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2007

    Flawed theology and psychology

    This is the worst thing I have read in five years (and I have to grade undergraduate research papers!). John Eldridge misquotes scripture, doesn't cite sources or have a bibliograpy, even though he quotes from other authors' works. His theology is extremely flawed especially in that he attempts to humanize God. As a book for Christian reading, Wild At Heart should not be on anyone's bookshelf. And as a self-help book, it offers no real strategies for dealing with personal problems. Eldridge's supposed revealing insights seem to be mostly based on Hollywood cliches and popular culture. Even then, he doesn't really give any good advice on how to change one's life. If one wants to learn what God wants men to be, one should read the Gospels. If one wants to learn real strategies for dealing with personal problems, I would suggest Dr. M. Scott Peck's classic book The Road Less Traveled and its sequels. Don't waste your hard-earned time or money on Wild At Heart!

    3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2004

    Prosperity Gospel

    Eldredge says Christian men at his church are boring, so he insists that men these men need a battle to fight, adventure to live, a princess to save. While this is an interesting concept, it places its authority in Braveheart and Gladiator more than the Bible and Jesus. Ultimately, this is simply another of the many ¿prosperity gospel¿ books, which is light on the Gospel message and heavy on secular riches. People may be better served with books that connect the divine story with our real-life stories.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2002

    Dangerous

    I have been a Christian my entire 37 years and have seldom come accros a book as categorically and theologically wrong as this book. The distance with which Eldridge has missed the mark would be laughable were it not for the chord it has struck with main-stream American Christians and the irreparable damage it will do to the shrinking shallow minds of fearful Christians in search of enemies to sustain their percarious sense of identity. In painting Jesus as a warrior Eldridge reveals himself as a person so frustrated with his own inability to find commonality with the way of Jesus that he rationalizes Jesus into the angry person that he is himself. This book is a poverty of thought and full of purely projected, short-sighted, infantile fantasies that appeal to the shallow American dreams of wealth, power, domination, and control - the very things that Christ condemed because he knew that they were our greatest form of weakness. Certainly Jesus was bold, courageous, and fun, but his kingdom is upside down and, unfortunately, as misunderstood today as the day he was murdered. "You have heard that it was said, but I say...."

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 28, 2009

    Wild at Heart runs wild with Scripture

    I¿m torn over Wild at Heart. On the one hand, I resonate with Eldredge¿s hungry search for authentic manhood. I likewise prickle against the shallow, ¿nice guy¿ subculture which has infiltrated some churches and some faith-related organizations. I agree with Eldredge that our society can emasculate, tame, and domesticate men, leaving them hollow, timid, restless, and bored. I, like Eldredge, deeply desire to live with vigor and passion, to boldly venture into the dangerous wilds. <BR/><BR/>On the other hand, Eldredge¿s use of Scripture in Wild at Heart is despicable. Your Average Joe¿s Golden Rules of Christian Literature are these: 1) Quote Scripture precisely and 2) Allow Scripture to drive your ideas; never use Scripture to justify your preconceived notions. <BR/><BR/>Example #1. On page 1, Eldredge quotes Proverbs 20:5 (NKJV) as saying, ¿The heart of a man is like deep water¿¿ But that is incorrect. The actual quote is this: ¿Counsel in the heart of man is like deep water, But a man of understanding will draw it out.¿ The problem, of course, is that Eldredge misrepresents the subject of this Proverb. God is not saying that the heart of man is like deep water; He is saying that counsel in the heart of man is like deep water. Eldredge uses his misquote to justify his proposition that the heart of a man is like an elusive animal which must be followed into the wild. He has modified Scripture to justify his preconceived idea.... (You can see the rest of my review on my faith-and-humor site, www.youravgjoe.com).

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2003

    Men, Women, and God.

    Beyond the surface of this book is a message that borders heresy and sexism. Not only does Eldredge fail to support his ideas with anything more than personal examples, he advocates open theology and the dependence of women on men to be fulfilled individuals.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2003

    Pop Theology?

    While not an altogether empty premise the book's main message falls short of other works in isolating man's identity and relationship with nature, women, or God. The meatiest section delves into the 'wounds of the father' and its effects on male identity, personality development and relations with the opposite sex. At its worst the shallow allusions to modern mass media and biblical quotations pander to an easy audience of unhappy yet passive born-again Christian men who wonder how they got there. If you like this book you'd be blown away by Lancelot (Percy), Road Less Traveled (Peck), Mere Christianity (Lewis), Bulfinch's Mythology, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Joyce), or anything by Carlos Castaneda...

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2002

    Worldy stereotypes and ungodly, macho vanity

    Elderidge seems to be a good guy, and I enjoy his honest writing style. But, man,why in the world are so many men hungry for his nearly neo-pagen, worldy stuff about being tough and dangerous by rescuing a beauty? Come on! Jesus has already rescued my wife and I sure couldn't if I wanted to, regardless of what Elderidge recommends. Sure we need passion and guts and dedication--and Elderidge's other books truly spoke to me! But this title includes so many (North American) cultural stereotypes mixed with really peculiar theology (Jesus died for your 'false self'? What could that even mean?) And all the whining! It seems to me the author has a bit too much time on his hands to think about his own issues, and, while his heart is obviously deeply hurt by the profound hurts of men in our culture, getting 'em to rescue beauties and box and hunt, frankly, just ain't tough enough. Lose yourself for God's Kingdom and skip the middle-class worldly macho stuff in this dangerous book.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2002

    Mixed review

    NOTE: This review is based on reading the book and attending the 4-day conference of the same name, and graduate education including Bible (honors). Since Eldredge earned a Master's degree in counseling, some of his counseling advice is well-advised and worth considering. His theology, however, is much less well trained, poorly or not supported with proof texts, and sometimes dangerous. Hasty generalization, a logical error, is the second most serious problem. The problem is that sometimes counseling and theology are so interwoven and interdependent that it is difficult to untangle the two. That said, he does say some things that are not being said in the modern church, and need to be said. All of this poses a serious problem for the new Christian, or the long-time Christian who has not benefited from formal training in Biblical interpretation. This comment will offend some who think that 'reader-response' is a valid interpretative method. They should read at their own risk. As for me, I can only recommend this book to those trained in a good, conservative school in exegesis and hermeneutics. At the least, one should know what a Berean is, how to be one, and five Biblical interpretative methods for testing the author's assertions in light of scripture. The problem, of course, is that those with this training will not need this advice, and those who need it may not heed it. If you are a pastor, and your congregation rave's this book, you may need to educate them.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2002

    Skip this book and go to the real source

    If you want to know how to be a good Christian man¿read the New Testament. Mr. Eldredge seems to have skipped the parts about ¿the greatest of these is love¿ and ¿turn the other cheek¿ and ¿blessed are the peacemakers¿ and many, many others. This book is riddled with stereotypes and poor interpretation of scripture. Mr. Eldredge takes his own outdated notions of what it means to be a man and tries to pass them off as biblical truth. It takes a lot more courage and wisdom to be one of the ¿nice guys¿ that Mr. Eldredge disparages than it does to be one of his ¿wild at heart warriors.¿ If I could give this book zero stars...I would.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

    Oh my gosh!

    Just reading the poorly formatted excerpt about how bored Christian men are was all I needed to see to conclude that reading any more of this schlock would be a waste of time. Moving on to the next book...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2013

    Anonymous

    My husband has read this book. Our marriage has been rocky over the last several years. He has taken the advice of this man to find what makes him come alive and go for it. Obviously it wasnt me. He has decided to start on this new adventure (with no discussion with me,whether it works for me and with no regard to my feelings about it). The things he quotes from the book sound very self serving. He tells me God made him for this adventure (knowing that it is not something that will work for me) He says i dont accept him the way God made him. Really! Is that what this book is telling men....that its all about themselves! Jesus was not concerned about himself, it was his love for people and relationships. Too bad my husband didnt read his other book Love and War, we might not be getting a divorce.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2012

    Not for me

    I Personally dont need a barbaric man to rescue me, I would suggest reading The Emotionally Destructive Relationship by Leslie Vernick over this one

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2012

    Warning

    This book is part truth and part heresy. At first glimpse wild at heart looks good. The writer believes that true biblical masculinity is gone. True. The writer believes that true biblical masculinity is a heroic rugged wilderness man. Wrong. Throughout this book the author focuses on the latest action movies and heroes believing those kind of movies are a good portrayal of a real man. In the worlds terms yeah, but to God, no way. And the book is soaked with secular advice but very little Bible. And even when the Bible is used the author blatantly misinterprets Scripture. Please understand that I'm not trying to badmouth people. I'm just a believer who loves truth and hates heresy. Thank you for reading my review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2004

    Wilder at Heart Now

    Wild at Heart is a very inspiring book for the Christian male. Grasping the inner soul, the book helps one find their purpose in life, and the plan to get on track in order to achieve it. I give this book two thumbs up for the awe inspiring reality that it brings with it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 review with 1 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2