Customer Reviews for

Wilson's War: How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2005

    Poorly researched, poorly written

    In ¿Wilson¿s War¿ author Jim Powell has done the impossible; written a book that makes Hillary Clinton¿s reactionary screed ¿It Takes a Village¿ look like a model of good prose in comparison. His writing is stunted and childish; his liberal use of exclamation points does not give the reader a sense of heightened importance; it gives the reader a sense that he¿s reading a fifth grader¿s history paper. The entire premise of the book ¿ that Wilson¿s foreign policy blunders led to the rise of Nazism and Communism and their subsequent bloodbaths ¿ is a huge, illogical leap, to say the least. It reminds one of the Saturday Night Live skit where George Bush, Sr. is trying to take credit for the fall of the Berlin Wall. (¿Before George Bush¿Berlin Wall¿after George Bush¿no more wall.¿) While that may be good for a chuckle in a comedy skit, it hardly makes for a scholarly tome. (Before Wilson¿no Nazis¿after Wilson¿Nazis¿) While I agree with Mr. Powell that Woodrow Wilson was a man whose arrogance and thirst for power far outstripped his intelligence, to lay the blame for the Nazi and Communist horrors directly at his feet is illogical. William Graham Sumner noted of the German people in late 1890s that they were ready for a dictator. The Germans and Russians were ready for their respective socialist tyrants long before Hitler and Lenin came on stage. Wilson¿s foreign policy blunders may well have been a contributing factor, but they were far from the only influence on events. I would not recommend this book.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2005

    Worst President? Maybe.

    Jim Powell, in his book 'Wilson's War', raises a legitimate question. Can we really hold Mr. Wilson accountable for the twin evils of Nazism and Soviet Communism? Both are generally acknowledged as consequences of The Great War but are they consequences of just one facet of that war, namely the U.S. intervention? Though he makes some inroads toward an answer, Mr. Powell spends much of the book describing the rise to power of Lenin, Hitler and Stalin and the atrocities they committed. The deeds these men caused to be done were horrific, but they are irrelevant to the premise of this book. Would they have been prevented if Mr. Wilson had not asked Congress for a Declaration of War in 1917? This is the case Mr. Powell needs to make. Unfortunately, what we get for the most part, in ¿Wilson¿s War¿ is the simple assumption: without U.S. intervention there would be no Hitler or Stalin. This assumption is definitely debatable. A thorough exploration of the possible fates of Germany and Russia sans U.S. intervention might have helped Mr. Powell¿s case far more than assumptions and re-stating facts. Mr. Wilson¿s presidency needs a serious re-examination in a popular history format. The myth of the idealistic crusader has overwhelmed the truth of the arrogant, ineffective interventionist and the bigoted, strict segregationist. This book is not that re-examination. ¿Wilson¿s War¿ is an attempt to use history to further a political agenda. Mr. Powell¿s libertarian leanings are apparent throughout the book and are expressed clearly in his conclusion. His writing style is unsophisticated and occasionally repetitive. These qualities will undoubtedly cause many people to dismiss his book. That¿s unfortunate, I think, because the questions raised deserve thought and discussion. ¿Wilson¿s War¿ is far from a perfect book but as the opening broadside of a debate on the accountability of President Wilson for many of the ills of the 20th century, it is worth reading.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 2, 2009

    Responsibility and Office

    Wilson, as President of the United States of America, held a position of great power and responsibility. The government, and its chief officer, are responsible for the safety and security of the nation. Powell does a credible job of demonstrating Wilson's mishandling of his office and responsibilities in advancing his ideology without respect to the magnitude of the dangers or understanding the leaders and countries with whom he dealt. Highly recommended.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2007

    A reviewer

    Woodrow Wilson was a great American president...'pause'...NOT! But he defended America and saved the world from tyrany and despotism! Or did he? Jim Powell provides the account that your history teacher does not want you to read. Find out why Wilson really dragged America into the war, and what were the consequences. Powell considers the likely counterfactual scenario drawing upon war-time conditions prior to US entry. Contrary to misguided popular opinion, a Central Powers victory was not in the cards, but a solitary German victory would at this point have been too close at this point and would resemble a stalemate. The resulting peace would have lacked revanchist treaties. But what about the Lusitania or the Zimmerman Note? The Lusitania, that supposedly civilian ocean liner carried an explosive cargo 'hence why it sank'. Unrestricted submarine warfare is not meant to cause large civilian casualties, but to destroy shipping 'and sink/ward off naval vessels'. Ordinarily a torpedoed ship sinks slowly enough to allow passengers to escape, but not if carrying esplosive munitions for the Entente Powers. The Kaiser announced the sub blocade in advance and the German government even placed notices in American newspapers to warn citizens against traveling in blocaded waters. The Zimmerman Telegram was widely believed to be a British hoax even though a few Americans 'notably Wilson' believed it to be real 'albeit correctly'. Even so, the military preparedness of Mexico was poor at the time, and the telegram explicitly requested Mexico to attack the US *only* in the event that the US joined the Entente against Germany. Arthur Zimmerman surprised the world when he confessed to the authenticity of the message, but made clear his intent was to preserve American neutrality. In short, this book provides an excellent introduction and a persuasive case for why Wilson was the worst president ever. Nonetheless, it was somewhat thin in places. For instance, it focuses on American involvement 'specifically Wilson', as the title implies, but does not give a detailed account of the British and French in their role in the war 'and in inadvertedly helping Lenin gain power'. For a more thourough examination of the 'mis'deeds of the Western Allies in WW1, I recommend 'Illusions of Victory' by T. Fleming.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2007

    Breath of Fresh Air

    Libertarian Jim Powell sheds light on an American 'hero' and reveals the ugly truth about Woodrow Wilson. Essentially, Wilson's decision to enter Europe's Great War was one of the greatest blunders of the 20th century. This blunder sealed a decisive Allied victory and lead to the various calamities of the last century including, the rise of Communism and Nazism, the Red Scare, WW2, the Holocaust, and the Cold War. Ripples of this frivolous conflict echo to the 21st century (the Mideast situation linked partly to the aftermath of WW1). Essentially, three major aspects of World War One's outcome paved the way for further tragedy. Namely, the Bolshevik coup in Russia, the Versaille Treaty, and the postwar Middle East situation following the end of the Ottoman Empire. Through Wilson's needless intervention, he facilitated the aforementioned events. Of course, the blame need not rest completely on Wilson as no doubt the Kaiser's government made some strategic blunders, and the leadership was in a state of corruption and ineptness leading to its eventual collapse. Needless to say, the Western powers appeared to be on the brink of stalemate. Until Woodrow Wilson arrived, pressuring the Germans to smuggle Vlad Lenin from his Swiss exile into Russia, and leading to an all-out Entente total victory and the infamous Treaty of Versaille. The important lesson I drew from the book, however is that the Monroe Doctrine was the way to go! America could have easily stayed neutral but Wilson had to drag the United States into the war. But this one action broke America's non-interventionist tradition. Following that we HAD to get involved in foreign conflicts (WW2, Cold War, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, etc.)!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2013

    This is simply awful writing. I am as conservative as they come

    This is simply awful writing. I am as conservative as they come but the relentless blaming of Wilson for the ills of the world in the 20th century is hard enough to take seriously. Unsupported assertions like "had America remained truly neutral, German submarines would have taken care to avoid American ships" with nothing to support gives this book a very editorialized feel. At what point in history are belligerents held accountable for their own actions and not dropped on Woodrow Wilson. The naked aggression of Germany in 1914 in invading Belgium as a means to attack France is an act they took alone and thought they had well prepared for. Mr. 
    Powell seems to not understand that. Consequences for one's decisions and actions are always quite clear in hindsight. Presupposing favorable outcomes baed on one's unsupported positions are dangerous. Do I think mistakes were made? Absolutely yes. Many of the sources Mr. Powell quotes are European historians like MacMillan normally are upfront that France and Britains leaders were influenced by past conflicts on the continent and were highly concerned by perception by their citizens. I would not recommend this book to anyone and feel very stupid for making this purchase. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    History is soo much fun.

    It is

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1