Customer Reviews for

The Winds of Dune (Heroes of Dune Series #2)

Average Rating 4
( 60 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(24)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

A New Dune Book

The Winds of Dune was great book that adds to the tapestry of the Dune Universe.
When Frank Herbert wrote the original (and still classic) series, he left a good many years uncharted during the course of the series. This new set of books (starting with Paul of Dune) d...
The Winds of Dune was great book that adds to the tapestry of the Dune Universe.
When Frank Herbert wrote the original (and still classic) series, he left a good many years uncharted during the course of the series. This new set of books (starting with Paul of Dune) does a good job of filling in some unanswered questions. I enjoyed the flashback scenes in this book quite a bit.
Frank Herbert, undeniably a master storyteller, could sometimes be a little dry in his writing. Herbert and Anderson do a good job at making the narrative a little more approachable. The writing was crisp and it flowed well.
Starting from Jessica learning of her son's death and dealing with Alia's learning how to run an Empire, this book moves swiftly from start to finish. There were quite a few parts where I couldn't put this book down.
The least interesting character in this book was Irulan. But then, she never was one of my favorite characters. She's never really felt well-rounded to me. She still doesn't in this book.
All in all, I enjoyed this book (and the previous book in the trilogy) and would highly recommend it to other sci-fi fans.

posted by Gnomicron on June 13, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

With their usual skill is right!

I don't know how any fan of Frank Herbert's Dune series can seriously consider this book well written. I introduces even more inconsistencies to the original books. Frank Herbert wrote about Paul's childhood, it didn't include running away and planet hopping with the c...
I don't know how any fan of Frank Herbert's Dune series can seriously consider this book well written. I introduces even more inconsistencies to the original books. Frank Herbert wrote about Paul's childhood, it didn't include running away and planet hopping with the circus. The only reason I tried to make it through this book is to point out how bad it is to real Dune fans. STAY AWAY!

posted by Nekhrun on August 12, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 60 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted June 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A New Dune Book

    The Winds of Dune was great book that adds to the tapestry of the Dune Universe.
    When Frank Herbert wrote the original (and still classic) series, he left a good many years uncharted during the course of the series. This new set of books (starting with Paul of Dune) does a good job of filling in some unanswered questions. I enjoyed the flashback scenes in this book quite a bit.
    Frank Herbert, undeniably a master storyteller, could sometimes be a little dry in his writing. Herbert and Anderson do a good job at making the narrative a little more approachable. The writing was crisp and it flowed well.
    Starting from Jessica learning of her son's death and dealing with Alia's learning how to run an Empire, this book moves swiftly from start to finish. There were quite a few parts where I couldn't put this book down.
    The least interesting character in this book was Irulan. But then, she never was one of my favorite characters. She's never really felt well-rounded to me. She still doesn't in this book.
    All in all, I enjoyed this book (and the previous book in the trilogy) and would highly recommend it to other sci-fi fans.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2009

    This book is politically correct and re-chewed piece of gum.

    This book, like others by B. Herbert and CO. is lacking brilliancy of the original creator of Dune. The original wholesome personality heroes of Dune now became muddied by constant self-reflection. Instead of them influencing the history , they became slaves of environment. Somehow the light, intriguing language of original Dune become boring pontifications about good of humanity.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 12, 2009

    With their usual skill is right!

    I don't know how any fan of Frank Herbert's Dune series can seriously consider this book well written. I introduces even more inconsistencies to the original books. Frank Herbert wrote about Paul's childhood, it didn't include running away and planet hopping with the circus. The only reason I tried to make it through this book is to point out how bad it is to real Dune fans. STAY AWAY!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 22, 2009

    THE WINDS OF DUNE: Jessica's Time

    THE WINDS OF DUNE: Jessica's Time



    In THE WINDS OF DUNE by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, the jihad of PAUL OF DUNE and DUNE MESSIAH gives way to counterrevolution and growing complications among the principal characters, especially the women. After Paul is presumed dead, Alia acts as Regent for the infants Leto and Ghanima, and Irulan waits in prison for her destined role. Bronso of Ix attempts to topple the messianic image of Paul, but overshadowing that image is the character of Jessica.

    The authors face the inevitable dilemma of building suspense in a novel which is both prequel and sequel, yet they manage it with practiced aplomb. The greater challenge is, however, living up to stylistic comparisons with Frank Herbert while fashioning an original contribution to the Dune canon. The master's "vertical layers," "Victorian poses," and epic dialogue inform characters. His free indirect narration and compressed or "coital" structure continue. Even a cursory study of the first page of THE WINDS OF DUNE reveals character, setting, mood and figurative language worthy of the original DUNE.

    As plot unfolds, the devoted reader knows where Paul is. He is in the desert. The dramatic irony experienced during his funeral could not have been had in the Theatre of Dionysus, yet the invisible hero has attained a stature reminiscent of Oedipus, wandering toward Colonus. Soon it becomes apparent that, wherever we find Paul, he will be upstaged by Jessica, and the reader must discover how others will contribute to some change in her, hinted in the winds.

    Jessica stands at the hub. She must be connected with Alia, Irulan, Leto, Ghanima, Gurney, Bronso and others in ways not yet revealed. Long flashbacks describe chapters which are structurally identical to remaining chapters. They are campfire accounts told by Jessica. A more daring stylist might have shifted to first person narration, but within the larger scheme these flashbacks work. In particular, the boyhood stories of Paul and Bronso evoke our own childhood dreams of circuses as well as Dorothy's journey to Oz, deftly balancing the familiar with the unfamiliar. And the show goes on.

    Ecological, political and religious parallels notwithstanding, Frank Herbert's great literary contribution begins with the idea of the hero. From the Houses of Atreus and Oedipus, to the modern Byronic and code heroes, this character as theme has pervaded Western literature. Through Paul we are warned about the disastrous consequences of our devotion: "May god save us from a messiah of our own making." Our hero becomes the father; the father becomes the son. But what of the mother? At the conclusion of DUNE Jessica says to Chani, "We who carry the name of concubine?history will call us wives." At the conclusion of THE WINDS OF DUNE Jessica might have hoped that history would still call her Mother.



    J. Walker Williams


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2012

    Good read

    This was a good read. Didn't like having to read a section, read another book of the series, go back to the next section in the book....just to read the series in chronological order. However, i really enjoyed this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I Really Liked It/I Loved It

    9-14-09 'The Winds of Dune' explains the events and actions of Lady Jessica Atreides between the time gap of 'Dune Messiah' and 'Children of Dune', after Paul-Muad'Dib walks into the sands of Dune to die. Naturally, there is a lot of animosity between mother and daughter, Jessica and Alia. Alia is desperately and tyrannically holding on to the status that her brother is the messiah. But Jessica is beginning to think that she made a mistake when she did not follow the orders of the Bene Gesserit, and gave Duke Leto a son. The obvious romantic relationship between Lady Jessica and Gurney Halleck is finally talked about. However, the most powerful plot in the book is that of the friendship between the two Landsraad Houses, Paul-Muad'Dib and the ex-ruler of Ix, Bronso. There are two flashbacks in the conversations of Jessica and Princess Irulan, about Paul and Bronso's friendship, that give reason to why they cannot stand in the way of Alia's actions in capturing and executing Bronso of Ix. 7-11-11 In my opinion, 'The Winds of Dune' continues to be a powerful and insightful installment in the Dune saga, even the second time read. This book shows us the human, ruler, and deity sides of the two most powerful Atreides women in the universe. As the events described in the previous review unfold, the complex minds and actions of the 16-year-old, regent, and abomination Alia and the mother, duchess, and Bene Gesserit Jessica are explained. Kevin J. Anderson and Brian Herbert are excellent creators and corroborators to these intense and highly entertaining stories. I'm glad and excited that the two authors are continuing this superb saga.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Really Liked It/I Loved It

    9-14-2009 'The Winds of Dune' explains the events and actions of Lady Jessica Atreides between the time gap of 'Dune Messiah' and 'Children of Dune', after Paul-Muad'Dib walks into the sands of Dune to die. Naturally, there is a lot of animosity between mother and daughter, Jessica and Alia. Alia is desperately and tyrannically holding on to the status that her brother is the messiah. But Jessica is beginning to think that she made a mistake when she did not follow the orders of the Bene Gesserit, and gave Duke Leto a son. The obvious romantic relationship between Lady Jessica and Gurney Halleck is finally talked about. However, the most powerful plot in the book is that of the friendship between the two Landsraad Houses, Paul-Muad'Dib and the ex-ruler of Ix, Bronso. There are two flashbacks in the conversations of Jessica and Princess Irulan, about Paul and Bronso's friendship, that give reason to why they cannot stand in the way of Alia's actions in capturing and executing Bronso of Ix. 7-11-11 In my opinion, 'The Winds of Dune' continues to be a powerful and insightful installment in the Dune saga, even the second time read. This book shows us the human, ruler, and deity sides of the two most powerful Atreides women in the universe. As the events described in the previous review unfold, the complex minds and actions of the 16-year-old, regent, and abomination Alia and the mother, duchess, and Bene Gesserit Jessica are explained. Kevin J. Anderson and Brian Herbert are excellent creators and corroborators to these intense and highly entertaining stories. I'm glad and excited that the two authors are continuing this superb saga.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Winds of Dune

    Didn't Quite Live Up To Paul of Dune, But Still A Must Read!
    "The Winds of Dune" explains the events and actions of Lady Jessica Atreides between the time gap of "Dune Messiah" and "Children of Dune", after Paul-Muad'Dib walks into the sands of Dune to die. Naturally, there is a lot of animosity between mother and daughter, Jessica and Alia. Alia is desperately and tyrannically holding on to the status that her brother is the messiah. But Jessica is beginning to think that she made a mistake when she did not follow the orders of the Bene Gesserit, and gave Duke Leto a son. The obvious romantic relationship between Lady Jessica and Gurney Halleck is finally talked about. However, the most powerful plot in the book is that of the friendship between the two Landsraad Houses, Paul-Muad'Dib and the ex-ruler of Ix, Bronso. There are two flashbacks in the conversations of Jessica and Princess Irulan, about Paul and Bronso's friendship, that give reason to why they can not stand in the way of Alia's actions in capturing and executing Bronso of Ix.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 5, 2009

    The Winds of Dune has me looking forward to the next book.

    I believe that Frank Herbert would be pleased. Readers of the Dune series already know most of the story so for us it is special to have the blank spaces filled in. Keep up the good work!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 4, 2009

    Dune continues

    The authors continue to enlarge the story of Dune. I have read and enjoyed every book in the Dune saga, and this is a great addition.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 28, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    I hope they keep coming!

    For Dune fans, another must. Provides insight into Frank Herbert's earlier Dune books.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Superb craftsmanship!

    Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson have crafted a novel that not only harkens back to the original Frank Herbert titles, in many ways the story satisfies even more, because so many loose ends are tied up in this release. The reader is drawn into the story from the opening page. This is a masterpiece in the series.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 4, 2009

    Once again, Herbert and Anderson fill in the blanks...

    "Winds of Dune", the latest collaboration in the Dune series written by Brian Herbert and Kevin K. Anderson, begins in Caladan at the court of the Lady Jessica, now Duchess of Caladan, in the days immediately following the presumed death of her son, the Emperor Paul Muad'Dib, after his final walk into the desert of Arrakis. Blind and feeling as if there is nothing left to live for after the death of his mate, Chani, Muad'Dib leaves Imperium and Godhead behind. The care of the Imperium and his infant twins has now been thrust into the hands of his sister, Alia, a teenager who was born with all of the memories of a Reverend Mother of the Bene Gesserit. As Alia struggles to face the difficult choices lain before her, her appetite for power increases.
    In the hopes of assisting her daughter in these tumultuous early days of the Regency, the Lady Jessica leaves her peaceful life on Caladan to return to Arrakis and the deification of her family. It is not long before Alia wonders if her mother is indeed her ally or is trying to steal the reins of power from her.
    Alia's problems increase as Bronso of Ix's propaganda against her late brother infiltrate the Imperium at an alarming rate. Bronso's works contradict everything that Muad'Dib's priesthood of the Qizarate and the Princess Irulan's histories have said. Like a Coriolis storm, everyone's lives are thrown about in their own bitter struggles: Alia struggles to maintain control of the Regency, Gurney Halleck has his own inner turmoil confronting his most forbidden desires, the Naib Stilgar is torn between loyalty to Muad'Dib's children and the Regency, Princess Irulan is torn between Alia's wishes to deify Muad'Dib and Paul's secret wishes to present him in a more human, fallible light.
    "Winds of Dune" carries us through the early days of Alia's Regency with flashbacks onto Paul's youth and early days of his Empire. A host of new characters is introduced, older ones revisited, all of whom help to tie in events of the past to events of the original Frank Herbert novels, yet it leaves the reader with enough loose ends to wonder what happens in those years between "Winds of Dune" and "Children of Dune". We are left with tantalizing glimpses of Alia's growing lust for power, Irulan's role as caretaker to the Imperial Heirs, and Jessica's struggle to choose between a peaceful life on Caladan and concern for her young grandchildren.
    If you enjoyed this novel, please feel free to keep up on other works by Kevin J. Anderson by visiting the following sites:
    http://www.wordfire.com (Kevin's main site)
    http://www.wordfire.com/kjablog (Kevin's main blog)
    http://www.anderzoneshop.com (the place to buy signed books and other items from Kevin)
    http://www.myspace.com/kevinjanderson (Kevin's MySpace page)
    http://www.twitter.com/TheKJA (Kevin's Twitter feed)

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 60 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3