Customer Reviews for

Women, Food, and God: An Unexpected Path to Almost Everything

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

22 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

Very significant read!

As a personal fitness trainer, I try to read as many books on the topic of diet, exercise, body-changing, and the like. This is such a good, easy read. The way it is written made me want to keep reading, and the messages are so applicable to so many people who seem to...
As a personal fitness trainer, I try to read as many books on the topic of diet, exercise, body-changing, and the like. This is such a good, easy read. The way it is written made me want to keep reading, and the messages are so applicable to so many people who seem to ride the dieting yo-yo. I will recommend this to my clients, friends, and family. I also recommend: "Build Your Mind, Your Body Will Follow" as THE MOST impactful book I have read on personal fitness/motivation/mindset. Check it out!!

posted by FitnessAuthor on April 8, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

36 out of 41 people found this review helpful.

Disappointment

I really wanted to like and get what she was saying, but it never quite made sense. It seemed like she might have been trying to get across the same message as Byron Katie in Loving What is, but if so, she didn't succeed. She kept giving examples of breakthroughs people...
I really wanted to like and get what she was saying, but it never quite made sense. It seemed like she might have been trying to get across the same message as Byron Katie in Loving What is, but if so, she didn't succeed. She kept giving examples of breakthroughs people had at her seminar/workshop thing, but what led up to the breakthrough was never made clear. This was one of those books, that I kept reading because I hoped it would live up to its potential, but it was ultimately disappointing. I couldn't recommend it.

posted by michaelsjlrc on May 5, 2010

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  • Posted May 5, 2010

    Women Food and God is Good Food for Women

    I'm not generally into self-help books but I read this one because of my book club. I'm one of those people who watch Oprah (and others) when she insists that overweight people always have past issues that remain ignored and that is what causes the extra weight they carry, and I think, "well you might Oprah, but I just like the taste of food and personally I would rather eat milk chocolate than an apple. I know why I weigh 20 pounds more than I should!" ....I haven't read any other of Geneen Roth's books but this book made me realize and I hate to use the term but it really was an "aha" moment, and that maybe I DO have some unresolved issues that I have been brushing aside.
    I found the first chapter a little ho-hum and there was another chapter later on in the book that I really could have done without, but for the most part, I found this book extremely helpful to read. Geneen Roth educates the reader about how important it is to let our emotions spread through our bodies and that it's okay to feel stress, boredom, loneliness, etc. She stresses the importance of respecting ourselves BEFORE we lose the weight and not to think that all our problems will be over when we achieve that magic goal weight. If we don't love ourselves before we lose it....we won't love ourselves after we lose it. I'm sure it's all been said before, but it struck a chord with me.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    GREAT BOOK BUT WHAT TO EAT

    I love this book as it addresses the relationship we have with food and the psycholgical aspects of eating, but I found it falling short of talking about what to eat. Certain types of food also create craving by messing hormones and that we can't control. I have lost 20 pounds on this book together with a diet that gave me guidance and shut down my hunger hormones the Perfect 10 diet. I am now on track to value myself.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful inspiration if you search for it...

    This book has some amazing advice and insights hidden amongst a lot of average writing. I did not like the author's writing style, I found myself having to read some rambling sentences over and over again to make sense of them. I also agree with many reviewers that the title is misleading and the suthor does not view God as many women who pick up this book might, but the main message of the book made up for it. Geneen Roth makes a lot of sense with what she says, especially if you are an emotional, compulsive eater. Every few pages I found one or two sentences that completely enlightened me and really made sense. I have read other books on similar theories of this way of eating and I liked this one for the fact that it had some really touching parts that will hit close to your heart. I would suggest reading other books on this topic along with this one...The Solution by Laurel Mellin is great and more straightforward. Overall, I was glad I read Roth's book and I know I will refer to the handful of inspriring points that made sense to me as I continue my weight loss journey.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2010

    Thank you

    I bought three copies; two went to my friends; we are discussing the book and it will bring us closer, perhaps separate some of our cells, but it is a step forward. We are more than what we were before reading this book.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 15, 2011

    Thought-provoking and empowering

    "To say that Geneen Roth explores the complex relationship that women have with food, themselves and their spirituality is accurate, but "Women Food And God" is so much more. Although there does not seem to be any revolutionary information presented here, Ms. Roth's compelling writing and insight will have the reader underlining phrases and turning down pages to remember and wondering why such basic and logical ideas have taken so long to be understood. The author shares her own struggle with weight loss and her ability to once and for all step off the diet merry-go-round. Her personal journey and the guidelines that she teaches in her seminars unfold chapter by chapter, giving the reader time to reflect. This book is thought-provoking and empowering, and is about much more than our relationship with food. I did feel that the spirituality/God connection received too little attention, but perhaps that's a subject for another book."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    Sustained Contentment is the new opportunity for Women and Food.

    I have read the author's other books and I find much new information here. The book discusses the importance of mindfulness, presence, and feeling my feelings. Experiencing my life in ways that allow for presence and awareness I am able to listen to my body and choose nourishing food based on self-care.

    I enjoyed the spiritual references. Intuitive eating (listening to my body) is a new concept. I found it motivational, and worthwhile. Descriptions of practices that can be used such as meditation, inquiry, and eating guidelines are described in detail.

    Another book I highly recommend, in the same category is, "Little Gifts of Sustainable Contentment." by C.J. Good. 365 daily affirmations about contentment. There are references to eating disorders and compulsive overeating that helped me enormously. In this book, a specific message emerges, and the book becomes very moving in unexpected ways. There is a lot of pertinent spirituality which should not put off those who have no interest in spiritual concepts. The open-mindedness of the author gives a richness and depth to ideas about beliefs and practical issues of being human. I found it a very subtle book, and one that slowly enthralled me. It never becomes monotonous. It is like a meditation on the nature of life and relationships. I found it quite extraordinary, and definitely to be recommended to anyone looking for a more thoughtful read. If you haven't read it yet you are in for an absolute treat! If you have, you don't need me to tell you how glorious it is. Leslie Robin (New York) Life Coach, Motivational Speaker, Writer

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 15, 2010

    Women, Food, and God

    Very insightful. Obviously someone who has been there. You need to be well grounded in your belief and relationship with God, or it could be very confusing. I would not recommend it to a new believer. I have found it very eye-opening.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 13, 2012

    If you¿re struggling with weight, if you¿re tired of dieting, if you want to love yourself, I highly recommend reading this book.

    I only made it a few pages into Women Food and God before I knew I would enjoy this book. Ms. Roth filled the pages with story after story which were entertaining while also educational and touching. She had an interesting take on the relationship one has with food and spirituality. I don’t subscribe to her beliefs 100% but do find merit in a lot of what she preaches. For example, I’ve never considered myself as one who eats to numb myself to feelings. However, I imagine a lot of individuals out there do. On the other hand, her examples of people she called permitters was all me. On page 156, she had this to say: "You’re sitting in front of a chocolate cake and you notice you want the entire thing right now. You don’t care whether the band around your small intestine from the operation you just had breaks. You don’t care if anyone else in the group gets a piece. You want it all." This is my relationship with food. I want it, not because I’m sad, not because I’m hurting, not because I’m broken. I want it simply because it’s there… and I want it all until it’s gone. It tempts me, it taunts me, it calls to me. And the only way to get the food to shut up is to eat it all right then and there. A lot of the book was about learning or rather relearning to love oneself. To recognize and understand why one has the compulsion to overeat. I wasn’t always a gorger. As a kid, I gorged like nobody’s business. Of course back then, I was as thin as a rail. I left high school weighing only 112 lbs but could pack away food like a grown man. Sometime during my adulthood, I realized I didn’t have to eat EVERYTHING right then and there. I could save some for later. I didn’t have to leave the table with my tummy hurting. Women Food and God was a reminder of what I’d forgotten not too long ago. On page 157, Ms. Roth follows up with: "Good thing you notice. You don’t judge yourself. You don’t think that wanting it all means anything about the kind of person you are. You don’t tell yourself how selfish you are, and if the others knew that you wanted it all, they’d throw you out. None of that. You bring yourself back to the present moment, and since your body is right here, right now, since hunger or lack of it is also right here, you ask yourself if you are hungry. Simple. Am I hungry?" When I go back for seconds, thirds, and please don’t tell anyone, but fourths and fifths, I can guarantee I’m not hungry by then. I even know I’m not going to like the way my body feels after it’s stuffed, yet I persist. Now if that isn’t crazy, I don’t know what is. Okay, so the example I used above may not apply to you. Here’s the thing, Ms. Roth addresses so many issues in this short book, one might be hard pressed to find everything applies to them. Like I said, I didn’t jive with all she said 100%, but quite a bit of it hit home. One item I disliked about this book, but at the same time found beneficial was the repetition. Ms. Roth said the same thing a hundred and seven different ways… and sometimes exactly the same way twice. Here’s the thing, whenever I thought to myself, this doesn’t apply and can we just get on to the next part, she repeated the information in a way which was relevant to me personally. If I could take all the filler out and get to just the parts which inspired me personally, this book would be perfect. If you’re struggling with weight, if you’re tired of dieting, if you want to love yourself, I highly rec

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  • Posted September 9, 2010

    Misleading Title

    I had heard and seen this book recommended many times, yet the title was misleading because I did NOT want to read a book about God and Food. I also though that she was coming from the place of people making food their God, neither of which applied to me.

    Only thing stopping me now is I need ebook format please!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2010

    Enjoyable

    I listened to this on a drive last Sunday. I had heard about it on Oprah. I have been dieting for years and this really makes senses. This past week I was faced with unlimited food. I ate what I wanted and stopped when I was full. No overeating for me and never felt deprived.

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  • Posted May 14, 2010

    Excellent Approach to Overcoming Emotional Eating

    I don't know if I'd call myself a compulsive overeater, but I do eat when I'm not hungry. This book, more than any other diet related book I've read, actually addresses that problem. The eating guidelines she sets out aren't offered till the very last page. This irked me at first, but then I realized she wanted readers to understand the why of them before they confronted the what of them. In short, the eating guidelines are a clear, concise guide to how to eat mindfully. I've been following it, and I'm feeling healthier and better already. I have a very hard time simply allowing myself to eat and not do other things like reading and watching t.v., but that's a major part of it. One of the others is to only eat when you're actually hungry and to eat whatever it is your body really wants. The key of course is learning to listen to your body so you'll eat what's healthy and makes you feel good rather than scarfing down unhealthy stuff because you feel deprived.
    All in all, I think this is a very healthy way to take care of yourself. I like Roth's understanding, compassionate take and her humorous way with words.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2010

    Great Book

    The author provided an insight into compulsive eating that I have been looking for. At points, this is hard to read due to the authors writing style, but the points she makes are very understandable.

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