Customer Reviews for

Wooden Boats: In Pursuit of the Perfect Craft at an American Boatyard

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 8 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2003

    TRUE, HONEST, OLD-FASHIONED WOODWORKING

    Author Ruhlman might be the new Studs Terkel of our time. In his various other books he seached for perfectionists, whether chefs or surgeons. This study is about carpenters, or rather more specifically, the men (and they are almost all men) who make sailboats, the old-fashioned way, out of wood. It might seem a stretch to dedicate a whole book to an obscure topic; after all, after you've met the guys, reviewed what they do, and lard up some stories, what do you have? A fascinating read into people and a trade and circle that we wouldn't otherwise be aware of. The author is not afraid to get down-&-dirty, either with the work and cutting and hammering, or, as his own work of writing demands, with trying to describe all sorts of esoterica about wood, lifting, boat design, the economics of shipbuilding, and he's also not afraid or embarassed to take the next logical step, and point out the 'meaning' of the task, its honesty, beauty, grace. The observation is made that wooden boats are probably as old as humankind, including some of our oldest stories such as the Odyssey or Noah's Ark. Points not mentioned are that Jesus was a carpenter and that Paul was a tent-maker, and we might be free to believe that they probably made boats and sails. This book describes the holiness of work, well done, lovingly, as a source of pride and life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 20, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Essentially Zen and the art of Boatbuilding Ruhlman brings all

    Essentially Zen and the art of Boatbuilding

    Ruhlman brings all his skills of observation, description, and writing craft to Wooden Boat. I grew up around sailboats, in fact, the first boat mentioned is the restoration of an Alden Malabar Senior, which is the kind of sailboat my grandfather owned 1957-1968. I really likes this book, as it is not so much about boat construction but about the people within the boat building culture.




    In a clear and elegant voice, he illustrates that what you make is who you are and vice versa. In this modern age of disposable things, its beautiful to discover people whose dedication to a craft defies the norm.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2013

    Blue

    She smiled. "Not if you dont want me to...." she licked his muzzle. ""We could find a pack together?" She suggested.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Nova Cool! Nova Cool

    Jhghhvffdtggghhhfrtjvdwrhffgjhfrujferyg$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2013

    Now illis Illustrations?

    When I buy a book of this type I would like to know Im going to see picture of beautiful vessels. There was nothing that mentioned this detail. The visual experiance is as important as the information

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2002

    In persuit of soul while still on this Earth

    Michael does an excellent job in recounting his experience and exposure to this unique nitche and those who are motivated by the elemental persuit of staying in touch with the elements that make up themselves and our universe in its rawist form. To say the least, Michael identifies with the root of the trees that become the subject vessels created by Nat and Ross however their story is more basic than that of pen and paper especially to those of us who have ventured to the sea in small boats. Drawn by the magnetic flux that surrounds us all in an invisible vail and to explore the last great frontier in three deminsions with earth, wind, sky and water. The basics of our being in this world and perhaps other worlds we use to navigate our way through life at sea and risk; to live through survival.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 8 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1