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The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century (Further Updated and Expanded)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

The Bible on Globalization

This is the Bible on globalization. Friedman not only writes well, but does so on this very important subject. He states, 'It is now possible for more people than ever to collaborate and compete in real time with more people on more different kinds of work from more dif...
This is the Bible on globalization. Friedman not only writes well, but does so on this very important subject. He states, 'It is now possible for more people than ever to collaborate and compete in real time with more people on more different kinds of work from more different corners of the planet and on a more equal footing than at any previous time in the history of the world.' What is more sobering is Friedman's elaboration on Bill Gates' statement, 'When I compare our high schools to what I see when I'm traveling abroad, I am terrified for our work force of tomorrow. In math and science, our fourth graders are among the top students in the world. By eighth grade, they're in the middle of the pack. By 12th grade, U.S. students are scoring near the bottom of all industrialized nations. . . . The percentage of a population with a college degree is important, but so are sheer numbers. In 2001, India graduated almost a million more students from college than the United States did. China graduates twice as many students with bachelor's degrees as the U.S., and they have six times as many graduates majoring in engineering. In the international competition to have the biggest and best supply of knowledge workers, America is falling behind.' This is Friedman's main point. He sees a dangerous complacency, from Washington down through the public school system. Students are no longer motivated. 'In China today, Bill Gates is Britney Spears. In America today, Britney Spears is Britney Spears--and that is our problem.' America is losing its edge--a point that is also very well stated in Fareed Zakaria's The Post-American World.

posted by Anonymous on July 15, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Had to read for class at U of M. Nothing earth-shattering about it, several very good quotes, however.

I do not typically read books of this genre; however, this was a requirement for a class I was taking. I learned more from other sources, mostly on the Web. The book is mostly cheer-leading, a sort of 100,000-companies-can't-be-wrong view of outsourcing/offshoring.

posted by Biss on December 16, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2008

    The Bible on Globalization

    This is the Bible on globalization. Friedman not only writes well, but does so on this very important subject. He states, 'It is now possible for more people than ever to collaborate and compete in real time with more people on more different kinds of work from more different corners of the planet and on a more equal footing than at any previous time in the history of the world.' What is more sobering is Friedman's elaboration on Bill Gates' statement, 'When I compare our high schools to what I see when I'm traveling abroad, I am terrified for our work force of tomorrow. In math and science, our fourth graders are among the top students in the world. By eighth grade, they're in the middle of the pack. By 12th grade, U.S. students are scoring near the bottom of all industrialized nations. . . . The percentage of a population with a college degree is important, but so are sheer numbers. In 2001, India graduated almost a million more students from college than the United States did. China graduates twice as many students with bachelor's degrees as the U.S., and they have six times as many graduates majoring in engineering. In the international competition to have the biggest and best supply of knowledge workers, America is falling behind.' This is Friedman's main point. He sees a dangerous complacency, from Washington down through the public school system. Students are no longer motivated. 'In China today, Bill Gates is Britney Spears. In America today, Britney Spears is Britney Spears--and that is our problem.' America is losing its edge--a point that is also very well stated in Fareed Zakaria's The Post-American World.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The World is Flat

    "The World is Flat", by Friedman is a provacitive look at the effects of significant historical events, international policies, and the development of emerging technologies on our world. Friedman contends that the world has flattened as a result of all of these forces and life will never be the same as a result Friedman explores the flattening of the world and the effects it will have on the future for Americans and other nations across the world. I was thoroughly impressed with the research and intelligent perspectives provided in this book. I highly recommend this book, enjoy!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 16, 2009

    Had to read for class at U of M. Nothing earth-shattering about it, several very good quotes, however.

    I do not typically read books of this genre; however, this was a requirement for a class I was taking. I learned more from other sources, mostly on the Web. The book is mostly cheer-leading, a sort of 100,000-companies-can't-be-wrong view of outsourcing/offshoring.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Scary truths of American society or social extremism?

    This book was truly an eye opener about American society as whole. From call centers in Bangalore to call centers Salt Lake City, Utah, - It is important for Americans to know what is happening in the world around us that, according to Friedman, is continuously getting smaller.<BR/><BR/>However, as a soon-to-be college grad with a business background, I set up some meetings with my professors about this book to discuss some of the facts of world globalization. Where all of what Friedman talks about is very true, it doesn't seem to be bearing down with his analytical intensity. In many ways, Friedman makes all jobs outside the mathematical/scientific realm obsolete by 2020. Maybe I disagree with the idea that earning a J.D. in environmental law will be obsolete, especially with the ever growing environmental issues. However, what I do take seriously is that - in whatever field of work I choose - I have to work harder than I would have 20 years ago. This is not up for debate!<BR/><BR/>Great book! It was a very quiet 600 pages. Friedman is such a great writer that I plowed through this in 4 days and didn't even realize it was as long as it was!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Must Read!: The World Is Flat by Thomas Friedman

    Friedman discusses the significant technological changes in our society as well as the effects of those changes on the world - the global world. He addresses how the process began when the Berlin Wall came down in East Germany on November 9, 1989. In turn, this event began the process of the "flattening of the world." In other words, the way the world conducted its economic business changed drastically, and with the introduction of the Personal Computer, the global world became flatter and flatter; the world became more and more connected on a global (flat) level. The internet was introduced, followed by the inventions of Microsoft, Apple, Google, Yahoo, Netscape, Skype, iPods, YouTube, cell phones; the list is endless. He also discusses how businesses outsource, insource, etc. For example, if an airline loses someone's luggage, when that person calls the airline to try and retrieve it, he/she is most likely speaking to a customer service person in Bangalor. Friedman's examples are fascinating.
    I enjoyed reading the first two-thirds of this book. Friedman uses incredible examples of today's businesses by interviewing CEOs and spokespeople from UPS, Walmart, Apple, Microsoft, etc. He also travels to countries such as India, China, Japan and Germany in order to explore this "flattening" effect. He also warns us that if we do not start teaching our kids the required skills for this global world, then they will have a difficult time surviving the twenty-first century. The last third of the book he points out the downside to technology and provides some examples: ethics, plagiarism, yellow journalism. My only critique is that the last third was a bit wordy. I got his point by page 500. I do, however, recommend reading it. Friedman is an eye-opener!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 5, 2008

    Why is the world flat?

    The book The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman, is non-fiction, insightful book mainly about the author¿s personal experiences with the leveling of the world¿s communication and information transfer. Friedman explains to the reader through his experiences, a brief history of the 21st Century. He outlines the world¿s flattening into three eras of globalization, ¿Globalization 1.0 was countries globalizing and the dynamic force in Globalization 2.0 was companies globalizing, the dynamic force in Globalization 3.0 ¿ the thing that gives it its unique character ¿ is the newfound power for individuals to collaborate and compete globally (10).¿ He explains the shifting of the world, from being isolated geographically, to a more integrated world that is dependant on the resources and information that countries around the world supply. "It unlocked half the planet and made citizens there our potential partners and competitors (441).¿ The book helps the reader to understand the transition from the age of industry to the age of technology.<BR/> To better understand the man behind the book it is important to know about him. He is a very accomplished writer that won the three Pulitzer Prize for commentary for the New York Times, and has written: From Beirut to Jerusalem in 1989, The Lexus and the Olive Tree in 2000, Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism in 2002, and Israel: A Photo biography. Most of which have won awards for best non-fiction or foreign policy. Most of Friedman¿s writings are based off the ideals of globalization, especially The World is Flat.<BR/> Thomas Friedman explains, in The World is Flat, how the world has shifted economically as far as the workforce because of the increasing need for math, science and technology as tools for progress, and the ability through technology for the United States to compete globally. Through capitalism companies want to maximize their profits by hiring the most qualified people for the job with the least amount of money. This is the whole concept of outsourcing and why American jobs are leaving the country. In his book he says, ¿This is what I mean when I say the world has been flattened. It is the contemporary convergence of the ten flatteners, creating this new global playing field for multiple forms of collaboration (177).¿ <BR/>I feel that this is one hundred percent true and that the author did an excellent job of providing many examples and in depth analysis. There are many options that a business owner looks at and the clear choice in every scenario is to hire the smartest people to offer the highest quality product with the lowest labor cost possible. This is shown throughout history that business owners always make the cheapest choice possible, even when it isn¿t morally right. The whole concept of slavery or child labor is to maximize profit, even though we all know it is morally wrong. Outsourcing isn¿t necessarily wrong. It¿s just a smart business decision based on keeping labor costs down and today¿s technology allows companies to employ people across the world as though they were in the same building. Proving my point Friedman explains, ¿Wages and rents in Bangalore are less than one fifth of what they are in those Western capitals (18).¿<BR/> Over all, I thought it was a very informative book that gives the reader a different perspective of how the different technologies that we take for granted now, like computers and internet are shaping the world. Ma

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2008

    Reality Check

    As I entered my freshman year of college I was nervous, excited and I was ready to start fresh. My first day my Buiness Professor was talking about the cirrculum and mentioned that we should all take a look at this book. For some reason I took his advice and read this book that is some 600 plus pages'I never read prior to this unless force'.I did it not cause I was forced to but I wanted to learn and that is what Friedman tries getting across IQ,PQ,CQ Chapters. I am only 19 years old but I currently work in a hotel that caters to Multi Million dollar buisness such as EMC Corp and Waters Corp and I got to witness first hand that globalziation indeed is no joke and something we should not take lightly. I often interacted with many people from China,Japan,and India and I often found myself asking them how they felt about Globlization. All of them embraced it because it is a chance for these people to take what they learn bring it home and build on it. Globalization is nothing we should fear it something we should embrace.I also work with three India interns all of them have a work ethic like no other and they have that drive to be better. They could not understand why us americans throw away all the oppurtinutes we have,he told me to ask a child parents what it means to be an engineer or doctor and you will understand why we work everyday to get better. I am now going into my sophmore year of College and you best believe I am going to work study and network more than ever.If I dont I know that someone in China or India is this should be a serious reality check to all young adults. I am not saying stay in and study your life away cause this is where I think these international students lose their edge is with their shyness. Work as Hard as you play is my best advice to all young adults like myself. Great Book Next One is Tipping Point

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2008

    I Will Continue To Learn More

    Thomas Friedman's The World Is Flat opened my eyes to a new realm. As I began to read the book a since of fear and worry came over me. I didn't know if I should cry or settle myself and gather more insight on the flat world. Friedman gives a great introduction to how the world began to be flat. He is very specific on details with the way he carries you on his journey to learning about the flat world. It allowed me to be able to imagine being right there with him from the airport, and to the other countries all over the world. This book shows you how America and other countries began to connect with each other. As I began to read the book it was a page turner for me. I am not a book reader. I will read if I have to like I did for this book for an assignment. But the more I got engaged in the book I didn't care that it was for a grade, I wanted to know more to help me prepare myself and other people for the next level. Friedman helped a lot in this venture by giving tips on how we can continue to learn new things about technology, become more familiar with outsourcing, and other people across the globe. I no longer have ill feelings about the ties America has with other countries. I now want to be more apart of it and educate other people on this topic. Reading this book will definitely help people to become more knowledgeable about how no matter how old or intelligent you think you are, their is still more to learn. The way that smart people stay ahead is they never want to stop learning. They also fill as though their job is never finished. Friedman definitely expresses this in his book. After completing this book I am eager to read more information or experiences from people about the flat world.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2008

    The world REALLY is flat!

    The World is Flat: The title is a bit misleading and does not allow the average book-scouter even a small hint into the gut of this book. Thomas Friedman does an excellent job at convincing the reader that the world is indeed, flat: flattened by technology. This book is broken into seven sections and in each section, Friedman points out the reason for this flattening and does so in a manner that is broken into comprehensible parts that makes this book easy-to-follow and easy to understand. These sections, while easy-to-follow, are hard to swallow. The global transformation, also referenced to as Globalization 3.0, will make it difficult for the U.S. population to find jobs if they are not educated in the fields of engineering and math, which are two areas that India and China are being ever-so educated in. Friedman is very particular and careful as he chooses real-life situations, verifiable statistics, private conversations, and confirmable case studies in order to bring his point of view to a personal and believable level for the average reader those readers who are not aware of outsourcing or home-sourcing, and who would have a hard time believing average-daily statistical quotes. For example, Friedman not only informs the reader of how eBay can open doors for the handicapped population, he goes a step further and relays a personal experience by eBay¿s CEO, Meg Whitman, and her meeting with a seventeen-year-old-wheel-chair-bound-boy who has become a successful eBay entrepreneur, so successful that his mom and dad, both, quit their jobs in order to help with his eBay business. This book is definitely a must-read. I must admit, by reading this book, my view of our world has been broadened, my interest in technology has been heightened, and my overall view of Globalization 3.0 has generated me to become better prepared for my future in this ever-so-flattening-world.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2008

    A reviewer

    The World is Flat A Brief History of the 21st Century by Thomas Freidman is an eye-opening book that will enlighten many readers into industry and efficiency that goes on around us without us ever even knowing. Freidman describes for us in this book how technology that he has learned of and witnessed through his travels across the world have been put in place and now play an intrical part in each of our lives from who we talk to as we make reservations for a plane ticket to who we are actually talking to when we order a hamburger at the local drive-thru. Technology, Frediman describes, has reinvented these jobs. So much so, that these jobs can now be performed by someone in another country in a whole other part of the globe. This book is a must read for parents who, after being challenged by Freidman, will get a renewed desire to educated your children in all areas of their lives. While describing for readers the technology he has seen which he adds is the reasoning for the flattness transforming our world, Freidman discusses in length the challenges ahead of our educational system and the role that parents will take if we as Americans are to have successful children in this new society. This book is a must read for those people who, like myself, don't fully realize how much technology has grasped our lives and how much we need to learn in order to maintain our competitiveness in society. Globilization is a factor to be reckoned with. We can either be a part of the change or be left behind.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2008

    What a Flat World We Live In┬┐

    The World is Flat A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century By: Thomas L. Friedman 488 pp. Farras, Straus & Giroux. $27.50 Over the years, Thomas Friedman has been writing books that have talked about what he has seen and experienced during his life. In the World is Flat, Friedman starts off talking about his travels around the world visiting different corporations and talking with the presidents, CEOs, and other employees for them. What he discovers very quickly is that most companies if not all, have turned to new technologies and modern day communication methods to conduct their day to day business transactions. Friedman talks a lot about how the US has been one of the strongest and most powerful countries, however the US has fallen asleep in some areas so now many other countries are catching up with us and are able to perform the jobs and services we could only perform at a much cheaper and practical cost for corporations. Friedman also talks about the different era¿s we have experienced and what we need to do to make sure we end up on top. He introduces our current era as Globalization 3.0, which has a main focus on the individuals. Friedman believes that if we as American do not wake up and start caring more about what is going to happen to our jobs that pay our bills then we could all be out of a job very soon because people in other countries are getting the education and have the appreciation that we lack to do different jobs. Friedman also talks about companies that we all know and use in our day to day lives that are outsourcing currently and we don¿t even realize they are doing it. So what caused this flatting? Friedman says many things took place along the way to get us in this place to include the: dot.com bubble, stock market crash, fall of the Berlin Wall, Y2K scares, 9/11, internet, Google, etc. So as you can see from the above list, these are new inventions or events that have taken place over many years and there is little we could of done to stop any of it. Since there was little that we could have done differently we have to find a way to stop as much of it as we can before it is too late. Another scary things brought up in the books is that we all need to think about what is going on in our flat world and then think 15 years from now what things will look like when our children are grown up and working to support their families. Overall, I do recommend this book to others. I think Friedman does a good job with this book and it will open people's eyes to what is going on in the world we live in.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 29, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Insightful of the Near Future

    In this book Friedman sets up how the world has been and is being flattened in juxtaposition to Columbus' finding that the world is round (Ironically, one can make the case, with Friedman, that Columbus was one who started the flattening process, see 1491 and 1493 by Mann). Bringing together several different historical events and the power of the internet, Friedman shows how the world is changing. He presents many of the benefits as well as the problems. His perspective provides some good resources for thinking about our future directions both as individuals and as a nation. I found the book very insightful.

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  • Posted November 1, 2013

    Must read!

    If you really want to know what is going on with the economy, thus book is an eye opener. Friedman looks at globalization from several different perspectives that gives us pause to think about our ethics and spending habits. Everyone over the age of 13 needs to read this to redesign his or her future.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2013

    Good info but too long

    Overall, an excellent book but could have been condensed.

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  • Posted April 9, 2013

    The World Is Flat [Updated and Expanded]: A Brief History of the

    The World Is Flat [Updated and Expanded]: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century by Thomas L. Friedman examines the social, political, and technological forces that are bringing the peoples of our world closer together. Within its pages, Mr. Friedman illustrates how the flattening of the world is creating an increasingly interconnected business environment where businesses large and small as well as knowledge workers from the United States to India will compete in the global marketplace.

    Globalization of the marketplace presents new opportunities and new challenges to businesses of all sizes and people of all countries. As the speed of communication and transportation increases, so does the ability of a company or a person to deliver products and services anywhere in the world. With billions of highly educated and motivated people entering the marketplace from India and China, competition is increasing exponentially.

    While many of us sensed the flattening of the world, The World Is Flat expertly illustrates what and how these forces are shaping our environment. I believe executives and managers armed with this insight will be better able to take advantage of existing flat world opportunities and envision and leverage future changes; enabling their organizations to remain competitive in the ever flattening world.

    All the Best,
    Nathan Ives
    StrategyDriven Principal

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    The world is bounded & not infinite

    What happens when the developing world becomes the developed world as us certainly suggested by Mr. Fruedman? Does it then become a matter of degree?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Long but interesting

    Surprisingly valid and thought provocing even several years after being written

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    Thought provoking and eye opening

    The book is easy reading and eye opening to the power and trends of globalization in today's society.

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  • Posted September 16, 2010

    A great incite into the 21st century

    I was impressed by how great of a look into the changes we face as Americans this century. The books offers great insight into what a flat world really is, and how we're getting there. It also shows all of the pros and cons to a totally flat world. Then offers solutions on how businesses, and individuals can succeed in a more competitive, flat market. Some of the pros are reduced tension between countries which share trade. Such as China the U.S. The book also described how we as a country can learn to make good out of a bad situation, such as 9/11. I really enjoyed all of the facts that came out of this book. It was a great read, though a little long.
    I generally don't read long books, since I find most of it is a waste, though this book was good, even though it was very long.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2010

    Must Read!

    Thomas Friedman successfully summarizes the condition of the world in this amazing book. When Columbus sailed the technologies available to him proved that the world is indeed round, but ever since then it has been flattening out to the twenty first century civilization we have today. Fiber Optics, Computers, the internet, all of these inventions have made it possible to shrink the world we live in. A person from America can call a help line and get help from a person sitting on the other end of the line in India. A doctor in India can perform an operation on a person in Europe. An thanks to the interned business groups no longer need to travel for hours and hours on long flights for a quick meeting. They can now see each other, hear each other and watch the same presentation at the same time on the opposite sides of the world.

    After covering this Friedman makes sure to point out that such developments and the relaxation of Americans may lead to an unpleasant future. As information booths and productions move out to china and India America is losing jobs and companies to countries like China and India that are profiting from the gain in workers as well as the gain in ideas. While The United States is enjoying cheap labor China is educating more college graduates ready to take over companies. For example in the US an average fourth grader may be well above the average fourth grader in China but by eighth grade he becomes on the same level and by senior year the Chinese student has surpassed the American student. That is quite frightening. with an increasingly more technological world it become easier and easier for countries to intertwine and use each other. In order to do that there need to be people smart enough in the country to know what to do in a company.

    Friedman takes these ideas and introduces them to the reader with shocking truths about the twenty first century world we live in today. It's langthy but once you begin you won't be able to stop. all the facts are researched, all the ideas are clear and everything is explained.

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