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Worse Than Watergate: The Secret Presidency of George W. Bush

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 29 of 29 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2004

    Must read

    Those who are Bush apologists will no doubt claim that this is a crock, but for serious citizens concerned about the course of this country, this book confirms our worst fears. Dean does it without the usual name calling and bluster that you find in most politically charged books and makes his case brilliantly. Read this and vote accordingly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    What a crock!

    No matter the president or the party, there is always a group out there seeing dark conspiracy around every corner. Dean is at least well written and fast paced, but come on - there is a difference between what is POSSIBLE if you interpret every act in the worst possible way, and what is LIKELY TRUE if you grant folks on the other side a modicum of decency and honor. If you already see darkness in every Bush cough, this will pander to you, otherwise forget it. What will the next Dean book be if Kerry wins: 'The Skull and Bones Grip on America's Throat - The inside story of a secret cabal out to destroy America's freedoms.'? Come on, get real.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2004

    Stunning in it's clarity.

    If anyone would understand how Washington works and the possible abuses of power it would be John Dean. He made his case thoroughly and with clarity. I read it in one afternoon. Sobering content and a polemic all should read before voting this November.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2004

    Provocative Look At Bush's Criminal Culpabilities!

    For a convicted felon, John Dean is an exceptional author. I remember reading his own recollections of the Watergate affair and his own association with the subsequent events that led both to his own denouement and the resignation of Richard Nixon in disgrace in 'Blind Ambition' in the mid 1970s. Once again he weighs in impressively by building a very strong circumstantial case for the investigation and possible prosecution of President George W. Bush for criminal actions that Dean terms to be indeed, 'worst than those of Watergate'. Culling from public records and the recollections of other eye-witnesses, Dean shows how Mr. Bush has systematically exaggerated, embellished, and engineered a series of preverifications and outright lies to the American public in an effort to convince us of the need for military intervention in Iraq. Dean argues that in asking Congress for a Joint Resolution authorizing the use of American force in Iraq, President Bush made a number of 'unequivocal public statements' regarding the reasons this country needed to pursue military force in pursuit of national interests. Dean, now an academic and noted author, shows how through tradition, presidential statements regarding issues of national security are held to an expectation of 'the highest standard of truthfulness'. Therefore, according to Dean, no president can simply 'stretch, twist or distort' the facts of a case and then expect to avoid resulting consequences. Citing historical precedents, Dean shows how Lyndon Johnson's distortions regarding the truth about the war in Vietnam led to his own subsequent withdrawal for candidacy for re-election in 1968, and how Richard Nixon's attempted cover-up of the truth about Watergate forced his own resignation. Dean contends that while President Bush should indeed receive the benefit of the doubt, he must also be held accountable for explaining how it is that he made such a string of unambiguous and confident pronouncements to the American people (and to the world as well) regarding the existence of WMD, none of which have been substantiated in the subsequent searches that have been conducted by either Untied Nations nor American Military investigators. Dean explains how the vetting process for any public staement is processed within the executive branch: 'First, I assured the students that these statements had all been carefully considered and crafted. presidential statements are the result of a process, not a moment's thought. White House speechwriters process raw information, and their statements are passed on to senior aides who have both substantive knowledge and political insights. And this all occurs before the statement ever reaches the president for his own review and possible revision.' 'Second, I explained that -- at least in every White House and administration with which I was familiar, from Truman to Clinton -- statements with national security implications were the most carefully considered of all. The White House is aware that, in making these statements, the President is speaking not only to the nation, but also to the world.' 'Third, I pointed out to the students, these statements are typically corrected rapidly if they are later found to be false. And in this case, far from backpedaling from the president's more extreme claims, Bush's press secretary, Ari Fleischer had actually, at times, been even more emphatic than the president had. For example, on Jan. 9, 2003, Fleischer stated, during his press briefing, 'We know for a fact that there are weapons there.' Moreover, Dean contends, others such as Donald Rumsfeld were even more emphatic in claiming Saddam Hussein had WMD, even claiming to know the locations as being in the Tikrit and Baghdad areas. Finally, he concludes, given the huge implicit political risk to Mr. Bush, it would inconceivable that Mr. Bush would be so brazen as to make such statements without some intelligence to back them up. Yet, according to

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2004

    Exceptional Work - A Must Read

    I have been following the GW Bush literature quite closely, and this work by Nixon's former lawyer - who has turned into a fantastic non-fiction writer who has raised my consciousness on our current Supreme Court Chief Justice - is at the top. Dean does not fall into the typical mudslinging or hero worship that has been the typical route. In this regard Dean and 'Worse Than Watergate' stands alone. THIS IS A MUST READ for all Americans. I do not want to give away the heart of the story, and I really could not explain it as well as Dean anyway, though I will offer this - I am a lawyer, and I find that Dean has 'Proven' his case, which is actually everyone's case or at least concern.

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    Posted May 31, 2009

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    Posted December 25, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2011

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