Customer Reviews for

You Never Can Tell

Average Rating 4
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    Not a favorite

    I have always enjoyed Kathleen Eagle books ever since her debut book "Someday Soon" many years ago, but I'm not sure what's happened to her. The story lines are a bit draggy, the dialog very heavy with tired cliches and the characters don't give me the warm, happy feeling I like to get in stories like this. Frankly, I had a hard time finishing the book, it just didn't hold my interest.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2001

    Wonderful read

    Heather Reardon is a writer on a mission. She is searching for Kole Kills Crow, a Lakota fugitive with a story to tell. Years ago, Kole was an activist for the Native American cause, trying to make things better for his people. But he dropped out of sight after the death of his wife and his escape from prison. <br><br> After Heather discovers Kole in a northern Minnesota bar, her life is forever changed. For she follows the hero of her dreams to his cabin where she begins to know him as the man shaped by the hardships he has endured. Heather and Kole embark on a cross-country journey to other reservations, gathering supporters for their journey to Hollywood, where they plan to make a stand against the bias of the entertainment industry against Native Americans. <br><br> Heather struggles to keep her personal attraction for Kole separate from her desire to write his story. And Kole tries to prevent an emotional attraction to Heather, a white woman who has put a dent in his hardened heart. <br><br> The banter between Heather and Kole is wonderful, ripe with innuendos and very quick-witted. Their relationship goes very deep, first beginning as purely physical, but gradually changing into an enduring ability to trust each other even in adverse circumstances. For a wonderful read proving that love can transcend anything, YOU NEVER CAN TELL can¿t be beat.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2001

    Eagle Soars High Again

    Kole Kills Crow, an AIM-type activist turned mystical flute maker after his escape from federal prison, has been living underground for years, hiding from the law as well as the political enemies he can't name. That is, until Heather Reardon, a freelance journalist, tracks him down on an Ojibwe reservation in Northern Minnesota. She's been following the story of Kole for as long as she can remember, and as far as Heather's concerned, it's time for his story to be told. And she has the skills and the reputation to do so. But will he be a willing participant? Ms. Eagle commands witty dialogue and conveys the sensuality of Heather's and Kole's relationship in such a manner that this book would also be enjoyed outside the romance genre. Fans of Russell Means' 'Where White Men Fear To Tread' and the movie 'Thunderheart' will love this book and feel like they have the 'inside activist story.'

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    showcases the modern day American Indian

    Free lance reporter Heather Reardon finds Kole Kills Crow, known for defying the South Dakota National Guard, in a local bar in the Minnesota backwoods. The journalist searched for the recluse to hear his side of the story of what happened in prison after he was convicted of kidnapping during the Guard incident. Just before his sentence ended, Kole fled prison when another American Indian standing near him is killed. Kole and Heather talk with her explaining that she spoke with people from his past such as the actor Barry Wilson, Kole¿s former mentor. Barry left the cause for Hollywood, allowing Kole to take the rap for the South Dakota incident. <P>Though he says he is only a flute maker, she and a Native American reporter persuade Kole to lead a Native American rights March on Hollywood to provide a more accurate picture of the American Indian. Along the way, Kole and Heather fall in love even as other American Indians join the march and other people want Kole dead so their exploitation can continue. <P>Best-selling and award winning author Kathleen Eagle provides readers with an exciting ethnic romance that showcases the modern day American Indian. The story line is very exciting, but it is the charcaters, especially the lead duo who turn YOU NEVER CAN TELL into a classy reading experience. As usual Ms. Eagle demonstrates with this novel that you can tell why books like THE NIGHT REMEMBERS and THE LAST TRUE COWBOY are so popular with readers. <P>Harriet Klausner

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