Customer Reviews for

You Saved Me, Too: What a Holocaust Survivor Taught Me about Living, Dying, Fighting, Loving, and Swearing in Yiddish

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted December 3, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    You Saved Me Too is a wonderful book. It chronicles a beautiful

    You Saved Me Too is a wonderful book. It chronicles a beautiful relationship as Sue stands by Aron through his battle with mental illness. It is truly inspirational. A true gem. Pick this one up!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    ¿. . . a story of life, love, and fulfillment that will linger long after the book has been finished.¿

    A tall, handsome, young Jewish man named Aron Lieb is swallowed up into the Nazi genocide machine of Auschwitz-Birkenau. After suffering untold brutality, starvation, sickness, forced labor, and many near-death experiences, Aron and his estranged brother Bill survive the atrocity. Everyone else that he loves and admires is murdered in Nazi death camps, including his parents and sisters. Aron’s shattered psyche becomes a permanent sickness, manifested by psychosomatic disorder, anxiety, and difficulty managing relationships. Susan Kushner Resnick is a writer, teaching creative non-fiction at Brown University. Suffering from postpartum depression, Susan has deep psychological wounds of her own. Living the American dream in suburban Boston, Susan has every reason to feel happy. She has a warm and loving relationship with her husband and her young children. Yet something is missing. Life’s vivid beauty has become a pastel afterthought to her depression. One day, by chance, Susan and Aron meet. Susan enjoys chatting with the old Holocaust survivor who has a sparkle in his eye and a penchant for charming women. From the depths of her depression, Susan needs to talk. Aron is a good listener. Over time, they become best friends and trusted confidants. Two desperate, hurting individuals sharing only the same religion become locked in a powerful relationship that saves them both in every way a person can be saved. Resnick has crafted a wonderful non-linear story filled with robust metaphor. Staged in first-person singular the story is produced via juxtaposition of accounts and experiences from 1919 through Aron’s death in 2011. As Ms. Resnick speaks to Aron following his death, we relive aspects of the Holocaust, yet without the minute details of Nazi brutality. We sympathize with him, despite his constant need for attention and affection, exhibited via his on-going psychosomatic illnesses. Susan is engaged by his majestic survival, his penchant for charming women, and later, his slide into unresolved depression, agitation, and imagined infirmity. Her dramatic frame of reference is always an unspoken conversation between her and Aron after his death. She also writes letters to Aron’s long-dead mother, revealing Aron’s charms, foibles and personality attributes. This literary frame of reference works magic upon the reader, although its non-linear aspect requires some early adaptation. Ms. Resnick maintains the reader’s interest while balancing on-going transformations in time, place and person. Each portion of the book alternates between past and present, revealing appalling historical facts about Aron’s survival in the Holocaust, their burgeoning friendship, and his increasingly precarious psychosomatic disorder. Aron constantly complains of chest pains, though the doctors can find no physical cause. As Ms. Resnick discovers, it is a broken heart. Ms. Resnick leaves us wondering if she and Aron were “soulmates.” The drama we experience in this evolving relationship is both beautiful and wondrous. Ms. Resnick reveals her own emotional weaknesses and the powerful strength uncovered as she fights to save Aron from despair and an uncaring world. In her drive to save the last days of a charming but increasingly feeble Holocaust survivor, she discovers her own inner power. Just as she saves Aron at the end of his life, his love saves her at a time when she required it the most. In the end, they were a perfect match.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    A

    This is a warm, funny, sad, brave, and wellwritten tribute not only about a holucost survivor, but the importance of human relationship. Doing the right thing has layered benefits. This is thoughtfully written and thought provoking. I didn't want it to end.

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  • Posted December 28, 2013

    Loved this book!  An unusual retrospective, presented in an unus

    Loved this book!  An unusual retrospective, presented in an unusual format.  The author's willingness to present her own foibles and anxieties help readers to connect with both her and her subject.  I hope the book becomes part of the Holocaust Museum's archives.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    Andrew

    Boot has begun

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Zack

    Hey trish.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    To rex

    Next res

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    Trish

    "Good luck."

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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