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Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us About Health and the Science of Healing

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    First off, I must admit that I have not yet finished the book. I

    First off, I must admit that I have not yet finished the book. I'm only on the cancer section, and I'm not sure if I will finish it. Initially I was really excited to find this book (I have the kindle audio edition), because I'm a Laboratory Animal Veterinarian, so I encounter and appreciate comparative medicine on a daily basis. But almost immediately, I was turned off by the author's repetitive and nauseating writing style- overuse of adjectives, subjectivity, egotism, etc. Furthermore, this book so far has NOT offered anything new. I realize that most people may not realize this, because they are not in the field of comparative medicine. And I would have no problem if the author simply chose to present the information in a book that is accessible to the everyday person. The author does do this, but that is not all she does- she claims that she is taking a new, 'zoobiquitous' approach that few people if any have done before. In fact, this is not a new approach at all and is done every day through comparative medicine studies, namely animal research, which the author makes quite clear that she is opposed to. But it becomes obvious that in her opposition to animal research, she has failed to recognize the many benefits that comparative animal research has provided (although she does make reference to research findings, but does not mention that those findings came from animal research).

    The entire book thus far exudes a sense of profoundness- as if the author is crossing uncharted territory. I feel like that is misleading to readers and does not give credit where credit is due- not only to the wildlife and zoo veterinarians, but also to the lab animal veterinarians who strive to uphold animal welfare while also contribute to the advancement of scientific and medical knowledge- in this case advancement that uses animals that have been selected as models of human diseases. The author paints a small picture of animal research as cold, uncaring, and unimportant. She portrays it as a field that uses genetically mutated animals that are completely unlike their natural counterparts. While research does use genetically engineered animals to serve as superior models of human diseases, animal research also uses natural animal models that include not only mice and rats, but dogs, cats, primates, frogs, birds, pigs, gerbils, snakes, horses- the list is endless. Many of her profound conclusions have already been concluded and put into practice in animal research.

    It is true that MDs and DVMs need to work together to achieve a heightened quality of medicine that benefits both people and animals. But the author gives the impression that human and animal doctors are really not working together at all. But in fact, they are working together extensively in the field of research/laboratory animal medicine that the author chose to ignore. Not only does the author not incorporate this field in her writings, she explicitly expresses her distaste for animal research. I believe that in order to truly develop a zoobiquitous approach, you need to have an appreciation and understanding for all areas of scientific and medical advancement.

    The author is correct about one thing though- that many MD's, especially specialists, have a superiority complex, inflated ego, etc. This complex is exemplified in her book.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2012

    Really enjoying Zoobiquity - highly recommended

    A friend gave me this book as a gift because I love animals. Had some doubts about whether or not I would be able to get into it since it looks like a heavy medical research book but it's surprising an easy read with nuggets of very, very interesting information I wasn't expecting to find. The authors suggest fainting is a defensive mechanism and lower heart rate is a defensive and protective. Never heard of such a thing but very interesting examples given. I found all the psychological parts of the book interesting especially with "grooming gone wild." I often wondered how tortured dogs in pets stores are when they pace back and forth (heartbreaking really). It's not healthy but it's therapeutic to them in their stressful environment and situation. The book draws a parallel with people who cut themselves. Really really interesting! I'm a bit of a health nut and the chapter about obesity is pretty eye-opening on how we as humans and animals in their natural environment are biologically wired. Pretty inspiring and changed my opinion on why there are obesity epidemics in many parts of the world. Just started the "leaving the nest" chapter. The story about the adolescent sea otters and their daredevil ways made me think about my sons when they were little human teenage daredevils! Bravo to me for diving into my first science book since high school chemistry! And bravo to the authors bringing a new and respectful to how we see animals and the people and professionals who care for them.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 14, 2012

    Zoobiquity opens up new vistas of inquiry for human and animal m

    Zoobiquity opens up new vistas of inquiry for human and animal medicine. In its way, as much of a game changer as Dworkin's The Selfish Gene or Morris's The Naked Ape. And who knew so many of the so-called "lower" animals could enjoy sexual orgasm. Overall: Impressive!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 2, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Recommended

    Zoobiquity is an intriguing exploration of health across species providing valuable insights for human health. This readable account highlights research as well as prejudice that has shaped our understanding of human health and medical practice and how greater communication and cooperation between human and veterinarians would benefit everyone. Natterson-Horowitz uses a personalized style often reflecting on her career and thoughts as she came to work more closely with veterinarians. Recommended for those interested in human health, animal/pet health, relationships among animal species, how animal and human health issues impact each other (zoonosis), and the future of health and medicine.

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  • Posted November 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Loved It

    fascinating reading how animals and humans evolve, my medical backround
    was amazed at all the sililar behaviors.

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  • Posted September 17, 2012

    A Must Have!

    Zoobiquity is a must read for any animal lover! You will not be dissapointed by this book. I have no history in medicine and found the heavy science stuff to be easy for me to digest. I will not be surprised when this book becomes a best seller, it is transfomative!

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  • Posted September 17, 2012

    Wonderful Read

    I found this book to be both fun and insightful. As a clinician, I was shocked to think how many opportunities have been missed that would have helped physicians – and veterinarians – better treat their patients. While there are some branches of research where comparative medicine is used regularly, it hasn’t saturated the daily practice of health care, and I think that is one of the brilliant ideas proposed by the author: this species spanning approach to medicine in routine practice, not just theory.
    This book isn’t anti-human, anti-animal or anti-research in any way – rather, it is about advancing all aspects of medicine by enhancing the dialogue.

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    Posted November 19, 2014

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    Posted September 19, 2013

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    Posted September 21, 2012

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    Posted September 27, 2012

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    Posted March 10, 2013

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    Posted August 27, 2012

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