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About Alice
     

About Alice

4.0 11
by Calvin Trillin
 

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In Calvin Trillin’s antic tales of family life, she was portrayed as the wife who had “a weird predilection for limiting our family to three meals a day” and the mother who thought that if you didn’t go to every performance of your child’s school play, “the county would come and take the child.” Now, five years after her death

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About Alice 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
risuena More than 1 year ago
I both love and feel disappointed by this book. I'm disappointed that this book is so short. It seemed like it just started and it already ended. I get a glimpse of Alice, what it's like to know Alice, and yet I still feel like an outsider, a point the author does mention. That being said, I love everything else about it. I prepared myself for crying before I read it and found, surprisingly, how uplifting, sweet, empowering, and endearing the author's words were. He didn't evoke sadness about his wife's life, any regrets they may have had, or ask for sympathy from his readers. He portrayed how rich their life was, how happy they were together, how deeply they loved each other, how they embraced every moment, and lived very fulfilling lives. The way the author can express himself and convey the love he has for his wife is truly amazing and touching. To be thought of that way or remembered like that brings one to believe in real long lasting love.
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AudreyCooper More than 1 year ago
This book was just too darn short. It left me wanting to know so much more about Calvin Trillin's wife, Alice; so sad that she had died when we had just met. This is nothing like The Year of Magical Thinking; but then Calvin Trillin is nothing like Joan Didion. The book is a brief introduction to a wonderful wife and the good life these two had together. She was a little eccentric, and pretty. I like that, that she was pretty and cared about being pretty. And smart. And stricken with a disease usually associated with smoking, but a non-smoker. And I so like that Calvin Trillin thought to write about her after she could no longer approve.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
a wonderful, touching tale about marriage and love. a little short - left you wanting to read more.
HWTrendell More than 1 year ago
This literally is the book that I wanted to write about my own wife, Mary, who died of breast cancer the day after the new millenium. Every page of my copy has at least one teapdrop on it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I wish I'd known her. Some five years after her death, The New Yorker magazine writer par excellence Calvin Trillin has penned a loving, touching portrait of his late wife, Alice Stewart Trillin, whom he married in 1965. Mr. Trillin has claimed that his work is not as good since she died as she used to edit his drafts. That's a bit hard to believe as while I've not read all of his articles and books, I have eagerly consumed several and found 'About Alice' to be as impeccably crafted as his earlier works. He's a writer blessed with a goodly share of humor, keen observation, and the ability to make even the most everyday things, such as the quest for a parking space, intriguing. Those who have read Mr. Trillin are familiar with Alice as she has appeared in many of his writings. We believed we knew her. Not really. As Mr. Trillin once noted in looking over the letters of condolence he received. So many felt that they knew her a fact he believes she'd deny. She felt he portrayed her as a sort of a dietician in sensible shoes. In fact, he noted this description of her in a speech he once made and was asked whether or not she was in the audience and if so, would she stand? Stand she did without saying a word, simply waving a very expensive high heeled shoe in the air. She was, as he describes her, a mother who thought that if you didn't go to every performance of your child's school play, 'the county will come and take the child.' She was warm, extremely intelligent, and generous, sometimes overlooking the inflation in a repairman's bill with, 'He doesn't have a very nice life. And we're so lucky.' They were opposites for him, it was love at first sight and obviously still is. 'About Alice' is, of course, about a remarkable woman but it is also the story of a marriage. As read by the one person who should do so, Mr. Trillin, it's a book that should be heard by everyone who is in love, all who were in love, and those who want to be. - Gail Cooke
Guest More than 1 year ago
The reader will admire and enjoy this treasured story of their marriage, one rich with love for one another, diversity, courage, enrichment, and affection--uplifting, honest, and a remarkable book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I wish I had known her. Some five years after her death, The New Yorker magazine writer par excellence Calvin Trillin has penned a loving, touching portrait of his late wife, Alice Stewart Trillin, whom he married in 1965. Mr. Trillin has claimed that his work is not as good since she died as she used to edit his drafts. That's a bit hard to believe as while I've not read all of his articles and books, I have eagerly consumed several and found 'About Alice' to be as impeccably crafted as his earlier works. He's a writer blessed with a goodly share of humor, keen observation, and the ability to make even the most everyday things, such as the quest for a parking space, intriguing. Those who have read Mr. Trillin are familiar with Alice as she has appeared in many of his writings. We believed we knew her. Not really. As Mr. Trillin once noted in looking over the letters of condolence he received. So many felt that they knew her a fact he believes she'd deny. She felt he portrayed her as a sort of a dietician in sensible shoes. In fact, he noted this description of her in a speech he once made and was asked whether or not she was in the audience and if so, would she stand? Stand she did without saying a word, simply waving a very expensive high heeled shoe in the air. She was, as he describes her, a mother who thought that if you didn't go to every performance of your child's school play, 'the county will come and take the child.' She was warm, extremely intelligent, and generous, sometimes overlooking the inflation in a repairman's bill with, 'He doesn't have a very nice life. And we're so lucky.' They were opposites for him, it was love at first sight and obviously still is. 'About Alice' is, of course, about a remarkable woman but it is also the story of a marriage. As read by the one person who should do so, Mr. Trillin, it's a book that should be heard by everyone who is in love, all who were in love, and those who want to be. - Gail Cooke