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An Obedient Father
     

An Obedient Father

4.4 7
by Akhil Sharma
 

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“A powerful debut novel that establishes Sharma as a supreme storyteller.”—Philadelphia Inquirer
Ram Karan, a corrupt official in New Delhi, lives with his widowed daughter and his little granddaughter. Bumbling, sad, ironic, Ram is also a man corroded by a terrible secret. Taking the reader down into a world of feuding families and politics, An

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An Obedient Father 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Wendystein983 More than 1 year ago
Sharma is simply brilliant
Debbie_Collects_Books More than 1 year ago
A brilliantly written story about corruption and humanity. Everyone should read this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Exceptional This is an exceptional work. These things exist in how world. A great story well told.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Akhil Sharma has written a brilliant story that will go down as one of the most memorable of our time. .
Guest More than 1 year ago
Powerful painting of a character. Down to the minute details, like the character's eating quirks,bathroom habits, his private thoughts...dark observations and impulses of desire most 'Desis' would like to believe do not occur in an Indian mind. You start off with disbelief at his corrupt mind, then you wrathfully hate him, and in the end Sharma manages to leave you in a place which cannot quite be described as sympathy, (something we dare not find ourselves offering him on moral grounds) but is somewhere close and is undescribable. Perhaps we come a little closer to understanding but not necessarily forgiving evil in mankind. And our sympathy for his victims is unchanged. Touchingly painful, bold and unrestrained in its exploration of lust, guilt, torture and the lives of ordinary people of the lower economic rung.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book, in terms of style of writing, is enjoyable. But the plot is so despicable, and so starkly unbelievable. To the readers from the west, anything is possible in mystic India. But it has to be kept in mind that it is a country, with a billion people, and with a culture so strong that it is retained for generations even in Indians who reside abroad. How many fathers molest their daughters? And to top it all, how many would molest their grand daughters?? The growing trend in young eastern writers is to present sexually perverted behavior to the west, because face it, sex sells best. Akhil Sharma could very well be rated as an excellent writer of perverted pornography. I think the playboy people should offer him a job.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story of a not so uncommon family. Far from the sacred cows and poor-but-happy beggars, a hard look at India. It puts a real question to the reader: who do you forgive? The writing is uneven, but on the whole, it is well constructed and the History background is interesting.