×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill
     

Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill

5.0 2
by Antonia Juhasz
 

See All Formats & Editions


A searing look at the human face of BP's disaster in the gulf

It is the largest oil disaster in American history, and it could happen again. It is more than a story of ruined beaches, dead wildlife, corporate spin, political machinations, and financial fallout. It is a riveting human drama filled with people whose lives will forever be defined as ""before

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
CHAPTER ONE &mdash; SAYING GOODBYE <br> It's hard watching the ship you made famous disappear in the distance without you, your crew knowing you were left behind. <br> My name is Francis LePale, the famed captain of The Sea Ghost, my ship. I was known as the "Peter Pan of the Seven Seas," because I used to smuggle imports to the needy under the noses of the British. <br> My first mate, James "Smithy" Carole was one of the few people left behind with me. He got his nickname due to the fact that he used to be a blacksmith for the British navy. He began crafting blades and guns for our crew and smuggling them to us before he got caught and came straight to us. <br> Third was my wife, Marline. She was an outstanding navigator and an even better swordsman. <br> And finally, there was that cocky and idiotic teen boy that somehow got recruited. He said his name was Jack Sparrow. <br> And now, here we were, stranded in the midd of the sea with no protection from the world except the clothes on our backs and the weapons that we carried. It would be getting darks soon so we needed a place to sleep. Smithy had the same idea and was using a hatchet to cut down some of the smaller trees to create a makeshift fort. We can't stay in one place for to long without fear of being spotted by the British. In the morning we would make a raft and make our way to safety.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book so much o m g.