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Blessings
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Blessings

3.6 77
by Anna Quindlen
 

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Blessings, the bestselling novel by the author of Black and Blue, One True Thing, Object Lessons, and A Short Guide to a Happy Life, begins when, late at night, a teenage couple drives up to the estate owned by Lydia Blessing and leaves a box.

In this instant, the world of the estate called Blessings is changed forever. The story of Skip Cuddy, the Blessings

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Blessings 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 77 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book will be one that you will reach for even after it's over. The story is beautiful and the characters are flawed in an endearing way. I read this in snatches (small children at home) but it was wonderful and SO easy to "get back into.":-) At one point it made me cry and my 4 year old couldn't understand how a book can make you cry - keep the tissues handy. It is a story you will be glad you read! The book makes you feel like you are there - beautifully written and incredible descriptions of a home past it's prime.:-) Enjoy and pass it on - well worth the read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is another great piece of writing from Anna Quindlen who is dependable whether in columns or novels. Her characters are real, her descriptions of love are honest and the story unfolds with secrets wrapped within secrets. There is emotional truth on every page and an ending that speaks to enduring love and decency.
Bean76 More than 1 year ago
Blessings tells the story of Lydia Blessings, an old woman who lives by herself in a large house with her namesake. She has a new gardener/handyman named Skip who lives in an apartment above the garage, and a cantankerous maid named Nadine. One night Skip finds a newborn baby in a box lying on his doorstep. At first he tries to hide her from everyone, but eventually everyone at Blessings knows about the baby. Soon they all begin to see their own lives transformed by the influence of this tiny, innocent creature. Lydia especially finds her own heart softening, reliving past memories of her own childhood, as well as her daughter's childhood. The main message I found running through the book is no one is an island. We all must have interaction with other human beings in order to survive. Indeed, if we truly want to thrive, the only way to do this is to cultivate meaningful relationships with others. Faith, the baby left on Skip's doorstep, is the physical embodiment of this message. She literally won't survive unless Skip takes care of her. Lydia is the emotional embodiment of the message. She seems to be a recluse, hiding in her house, hardly daring to even go outside. And yet, she will peek through her windows with binoculars to watch what goes on outside. She needs social interaction, but denies herself of it. But as the story progresses, Lydia opens herself up bit by bit to her friends and family, and finds healing for her own heart.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is very good. The story skips from Lydia's past to her present alot. But the storyline of Skip and Faith is wonderful. I wish the ending would have been different but oh well.... Wonderful story!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought the book on a whim, and I was greatly disappointed. I finished it, but it was tough. The idea is riveting, but the author fails to deliver the twists with a dramatic flare. Therefore, the portions where readers should be shocked, fall with an anticlimatic bang. Another problem was the description in the book. She described the scenes to the point of obsurdity. At times I found myself reading on and on about chairs.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have started this book FOUR times, and cannot get into it! Quindlen needs a good editor, who will separate the wheat from the chaff...break up some of the rambling sentences, for starters. One sentence was 50 words long, another was 83! An 83 word SENTENCE! That's ludicrous! Yes, I found the book so boring that I resorted to counting words in sentences! I don't know HOW this book ever made the NY Times Best Seller list!
Guest More than 1 year ago
After a slow start, I was very impressed by this book. From the reviews and description on the book jacket, I was afraid that this would be Anne Tyler Lite. While I like her writing very much, this book was much deeper than what I have read by Tyler, if not as intimately written as Tyler's books. Like Richard Russo's Empire Falls (one of my all-time favorites) the book deals with a wealthy matriarch living in a large estate. But unlike that book, which held the old lady up as an enigma, Blessings gets into her mind by having her help her groundskeeper raise an infant left on his garage/apartment doorstep (the baby was obviously left there to be taken care of the rich owner of the estate). The most interesting parts of the book are the flashbacks into her own life that explain what forced her out of Manhattan debutante life and into lifelong exile at her family's country estate. At time the book reminded me of Ian McEwan's Atonement, but never actually reaches the heights of that book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My first contact with a Quindlen manuscript. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. There were some spots that dragged (Lydia's past). Lydia, Skip, Jennifer, Nadine - all strong character developments. Reminded me of 'The Lovely Bones'. Same lyrical style as Belva Plain. A predictable story line but revelations on family, love, loss, and redemption make it a worthwhile read. Readable on a rainy day with a good cup of coffee.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed Anna Quindlen's books in the past. 'Black and Blue' was a great book that kept you reading on. 'One True Thing' was a story I could relate to personal experience and was touching. But I did not feel the same about 'Blessings.' I thought this book sort of dragged along and was sort of dry. I was definitely expecting a little more excitement in the story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was difficult to believe that a young man wanted to raise a baby that he found on the steps to his apartment. The story seemed far-fetched and I had a hard time finishing the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love Anna Q., so sad this was not near what her past novels have been. Hate to say it, but it was boring. Not worth the $ spent. Truly hope this was an aberration b/c I am hooked on the author's talent.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It was a intricate tale told with Anna Quindlen's wonderful way with words. I would recommend this book for anyone interested in a richly woven story of the human heart with all it's ups and downs. The setting came to life in it's beauty and was the perfect backdrop for the novel's past and present characters, as they wove their way through their lives meeting and changing as they aged. Sandine
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All of her books move me...
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not the best.
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