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The Blue Parakeet: Rethinking How You Read the Bible
     

The Blue Parakeet: Rethinking How You Read the Bible

3.9 16
by Scot McKnight
 

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"Why Can’t I Just Be a Christian?” Parakeets make delightful pets. We cage them or clip their wings to keep them where we want them. Scot McKnight contends that many, conservatives and liberals alike, attempt the same thing with the Bible. We all try to tame it. McKnight’s The Blue Parakeet has emerged at the perfect time to cool the flames of a

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Blue Parakeet 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
JaniceByrd--RadioBookTalk More than 1 year ago
"Rethinking How You Read the Bible" is the subtitle of Scot McKnight's book THE BLUE PARAKEET. Since everyone picks and chooses, adopts and adapts from the Bible, the issue for McKnight is the how and why of what we choose from the Bible to apply to today. "How are we to live out the Bible today?" God gave us the Bible in order to transform us, and He wants us to move the biblical principles into our relationships, personal character, and actions. That process is called discernment, and it is facilitated by the Holy Spirit and our community of faith. "Until we learn to read the Bible as Story, we will not know how to get anything out of the Bible for daily living. Biblical principles are trans-cultural, but specific expressions are not," says McKnight. This concise, well-organized, and often humorous book is easy to read and understand. McKnight uses metaphors, personal examples, stories from his college students, and historical data to illustrate his points. One case study he uses throughout the book, and in a special section in the last one hundred pages, is "women in church ministries." In it, McKnight demonstrates what he means by "discernment" as he examines the critical biblical passages that deal with this controversial topic. The tone of THE BLUE PARAKEET is gentle, reasoned, and entertaining. It made me see myself as the backyard sparrow, often afraid to deal with the strange, unexpected parakeets that occasionally fly into my world, as I hide out and wish them away. I will not be so quick to silence the blue parakeets now as I try to live out the Bible, in my day, in my way.
Curtis_W_Lindsey More than 1 year ago
McKnight begins by observing we all want to know what the Bible says on a variety of issues such as homosexuality, charismatic gifts, and women in ministry. But the truth is, when it comes to the answers, we all pick and choose what portions of the Bible to follow. Most of us, to some degree or another, give lip service to the Bible¿s teachings in favor of convenience, political correctness, or social sensibility.

The book is divided up into four parts. The first deals with answering the question ¿what is the Bible.¿ Here McKnight argues we are to read the Bible ¿through¿ tradition. That is, we understand how the Bible has been historically read but we do not allow ourselves to be boxed in to the past. Part two is an encouragement to interact with the person who wrote the Bible, not the pages it¿s written on. In part three, McKnight writes about the need for discernment as we ¿pick and choose¿ which portions of Scripture are directly applicable to our 21st century lives. And finally, part four gives an example of discernment by investigating the role of women in the church.

The book will make you think. Many of the best points in the book force you to take stock of how you interpret (or ignore) certain portions of the Bible. I do not agree with all of McKnight¿s conclusions, but I appreciate his honesty when it comes to interpretation. In the end, the book serves as a reminder of the needed humility and grace when it comes to following what the Bible says.
CaroleJRJ More than 1 year ago
Our Sunday School is using this book to challenge our way of thinking about reading the Bible. It has led to new ways of considering things that we thought we were familiar with, and much interesting discussion.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book gives you a different look at reading the bible. I thought it was very interesting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good book for helping you take a new look at how you read the Bible
TerriKin More than 1 year ago
Should women be ordained? My own standard answer to that, which is supremely practical, is this: If you believe they should be, then attend a church that ordains women. Unfortunately, evangelical churches still have a cadre of loud complainers who refuse that sensible advice, preferring to stay in churches that don’t ordain women. Apparently they won’t be happy until EVERY church ordains women. On their side are people like this Scot McKnight. He begins the book with his big “discovery”: “we all pick and choose” (p 11) what parts of the Bible to obey. “No one does everything the Bible says” (p 12). True – the New Testament itself makes it clear that the first Christians were freed from the ceremonial laws of the Old Testament. Jesus and the apostles make it clear that the MORAL laws of the Old Testament still apply—notably the Ten Commandments. But the author claims we don’t even follow those—we don’t keep the Sabbath holy. “I found numerous references in the Acts of the Apostles to the Christian observance of the Sabbath” (p 14). No, he didn’t—there are none. The only mentions of the Sabbath in Acts are Paul going to the synagogues on the Sabbath because that’s where the Jews and God-fearers gathered. There is NO mention of Christians observing the Sabbath – none. In all Paul’s letters, the only time he mentions the Sabbath is in Colossians 2:16: “Let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath.” None of the other New Testament epistles mention Sabbath-keeping. Clearly the Gentile converts were NOT told to observe the Sabbath. “The pick-and-choose method is an exercise in hypocrisy or worse” (p 19). Why? Isn’t it obvious to anyone with a brain that “You shall not murder” is more important than tithing? What he calls “picking and choosing” could be called “distinguishing between major and minor.” “If Paul says women should be silent, our women should be silent. If Exodus says the death penalty is proper, then it is proper today (even for adulterers)” (p 26). Again, this is a familiar tactic of liberals: we obviously do NOT abide by every verse of the Bible, so we’re all hypocrites. It’s disturbing to read something like this in a Christian book, for this idea has been used for many years by the enemies of Christianity. I don’t think any Christian with a functioning brain can be convinced that, since we don’t stone adulterers today, let’s don’t follow the teachings of Peter and Paul either. Having supposedly convinced the reader that NO Christians really live by the whole Bible, he launches into his main subject: “Why do some churches ordain women and let them preach while other churches have folks who get up and walk out when a woman opens her Bible for some teaching in front of men?” (p 18). Lots of books refer to “men walking out,” but no one ever cites an actual case where it happened. It is typical in books like this to accuse conservative Christians of loutish behavior.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Greatly enjoyed the work. Would have enjoyed more depth on the issue of discernment as that seems to be the key to the entire work. Want to avoid complete subjectivity when exercising discernment. Great insight and spot on the issue of women in ministry.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm just gonna say I'm pregnant and leave it at that.