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The Book of Lost Things
     

The Book of Lost Things

4.3 237
by John Connolly
 

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High in his attic bedroom, twelve-year-old David mourns the death of his mother. He is angry and alone, with only the books on his shelf for company. But those books have begun to whisper to him in the darkness, and as he takes refuge in his imagination, he finds that reality and fantasy have begun to meld. While his family falls apart around him, David is

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The Book of Lost Things 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 237 reviews.
Janus More than 1 year ago
Take Pan's Labyrinth and remove all the period-piece drama (so, basically the majority of the film), throw in a healthy dose of what The Brothers Grimm (yes, the Matt Damon and Heath Ledger film) COULD have been and you will have a vague concept of this amazing book. The most apt description I have heard for the Book of Lost Things so far is that it is a fairytale for grownups. The synopsis on the back gives you the setting, but please don't mistake that for the actual plot of the book. This story is about growing up and about loss. It is touching and creepy. Great characters, phenomenal prose and some excellent twists make The Book of Lost things as captivating a book as any reader can hope for.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am an avid reader of varied fiction and non-fiction and I have to say that the Book of Lost Things is one of the best books that I have read in a long time. The author takes classic Grimm fairytales and turns them around to give the reader a new view of what they were brought up being told as a child. The fairytales also help to advance the well-thought out plotline and give credence to many of the main characters decisions. Although the book is based in fairy tales I would not reccomend it for children under the age of at least fifteen due to very graphic scenes and sexual allusions. However, the book is phenomenal if read by the right age group and provides a unique perceptive on well-told tales. This is a book I will read over and over again.
Elvisbaby More than 1 year ago
If you ever loved fairy tales this is a book for you. It reminded me of all the reasons that I love to read in the first place.
Annibebe More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. It's a fantasy similar to The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, however. The young boy in the story loses his mother and he escapes into an alternate universe where he learns to cope with his loss, change and begins to grow up. Really liked this book, and will be reading other titles by this author!
Depositink More than 1 year ago
After putting down and letting it sink in for a second, I cried. It was full of adventure and character growth. With every twist and turn the book took me down I would try and guess how it would work out of our little David, but every time it would surprise me. Nothing is as it seems. The fairy tales have a wonderful twist as if you're reading them for the first time. This is an amazing book and would have everyone I know read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Got this book from the library and loved it so much I had to buy a copy for myself! I would recommend it to anyone high school aged and older since it has some dark parts that may not be acceptable for young children. Otherwise, my new favorite book!
LadyHester More than 1 year ago
This is exactly the type of book I love!!
jcsbookhaven More than 1 year ago
Author John Connolly is well known for thrillers such as The Unquiet, but he flows more heavily into fantasy and fairy tales for The Book of Lost Things. Still, these fairy tale characters remind the reader of Grimm creatures and the story itself is dark and chilling. The main character, David, is a 12-year-old boy whose mother passes away and is left with his father and his books. When Dad marries and has another child, David has a hard time coping, and begins to see his stories leap off his shelves and into his real life. After a series of "attacks", David finds himself in "Elsewhere", a new realm filled with some creatures who befriend him and some who attack him. David must make his way to the King and his Book of Lost Things if he hopes to make it back to his home in 1940's Europe all while dodging The Crooked Man who "will say less than he means and conceal more than he reveals." The book touches on love, loss, envy, and survival but is largely about the progress of a boy becoming a man. Since the main character is a boy, you cannot help but cheer him through his struggles and at times wince at his reasoning or applaud his brave stands. One of my favorite things is the importance Connolly gives to books and stories. As an avid reader, I felt drawn to his ideas that books wanted to be read and wanted us to bring them to life. I felt like I could hear the books whispering to me just as they did to David. He has a gift for making you feel what he wants you to feel. I was not a fan of how slow moving some of the first few chapters were. There was some information given early on that I feel slowed down the reading and actually took away from it instead of adding necessary background information or anything of importance. Also, for the most part the tone of the book is not one that I would generally get in to as I do not prefer sad stories or horror tales and felt this had both. I would not  recommend children read this book even though it would seem like it would appeal to them since there are grisly aspects and frankly graphic and twisted content within. The Book of Lost Things takes you on quite a journey. All readers will come to their own conclusions about certain events and in fact "Elsewhere" itself which I love. I gave this book 3 stars. “These stories were very old, as old as people, and they had survived because they were very powerful indeed. They were the tales that echoed in the head long after the books that contained them were cast aside. They were both an escape from reality and an alternative reality themselves. They were so old, and so strange, that they had found a kind of existence independent of the pages they occupied. The world of the old tales existed parallel to ours, but sometimes the walls separating the two became so thin and brittle that the two worlds started to blend into each other. That was when the trouble started. That was when the bad things came. That was when the Crooked Man began to appear to David.”
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You should read this book, it has action gallore and a deep meaning. The very few bad reviews must be written by people with no taste in good writing and cant read at a high school level. Seriously, get it.
GardenerGal More than 1 year ago
At first I thought it'd be really silly, but it came together on a much deeper level. Also deeply entertaining! Clever storyline!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book! Takes existing fairytales and adds some darkness to them! Along with a great story! If you like fantasy this is a must read for you!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Such a great book! Connolly really puts a dark twist to all the classic fairy tales!
BookFanNYC More than 1 year ago
part Pan's Labyrinth, part Narnia. A fascinating melding and reinterpritation of classic fairy tales and fables.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book does an amazing job in transforming children's fairy tales into adult tales. The author does an outstanding job being descriptive through out the whole story. The only complaint I have though, is that the characters in the story 'aside from the main character' don't have too much of a personality to them and seem rather dull. The main character, David, matures through the story and is the type of character you can't help but love. The other characters in the story, however, are just....meh, but there are some characters with some spunk to them. Anyway, the story is good, the moral is good, awesome plot twisters, and the ending is one of the best endings I've read in a long time.
colorsplash7 More than 1 year ago
As an avid lover of Fairy Tales especially Fairy Tales for adults this book was a great read. I am not a great reviewer of books but this one was well worth the reading time. I was not particularly surprised by any of it but I was delighted by almost all of it. His perspective of a young boy's need to grow up a bit too quickly is right on the money. I loved this book. I think the strangest thing is how this book lead me to the Bitterbynde trilogy and the progression seems almost perfect.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wasn't sure about this book until I gave it a chance and kept reading past the part where David's mom passes. I think it was the fairy tale references that kept me going. The tales reminded me of dreams where reality is twisted and anything goes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read this book a half dozen times. I will read it again. It is as powerful as a name given to the Crooked Man. I love the fairy tale elements.
Jeff-in-Orem-Utah More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book, except for a few things here and their. But I have found over the years snce I read it that t has really stuck with me. I guess that is the mark of a very good book. It is quite violent and it is also very funny in places. If you like his style and the humor in the book, try reading John Connolly's "The Gates" and "The Infernals"--absolutely laugh out loud funny.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book quickly became one of my favorites, and I do not judge lightly. The prose is beautiful, the craft is outstanding, and the story is memorable and poignant. The book follows a young man, David, after is life is turned on its head by the loss of his mother, WWII and he father's new marriage. It focuses on loss in various forms, but most importantly the loss of the selfish peace that is inherent in childhood. As he is forced to cope with the difficult and unwanted changes in his world, the stories of his youth begin to change also. He is drawn into world of fairytales, which has become twisted and dark, as they are mixed with his own impressions of an adult reality. Soon, David is torn by the real-world responsibilities he is forced to take on throughout his journey, and the venal fantasy-land that is temping him to abandon reality altogether.
EST_67 More than 1 year ago
Excellent story! It is both thrilling and beautiful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I loved the darkness and the weirdness and everything about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Best book. Must have. Love the way u ise differnt storries. Keep it up. Sequal?????????? Bes book ever
LindyMom More than 1 year ago
Not so much. Loved this author's writing style and depth, but the story just meandered along... didn't really go anywhere for me. I will read him again, however. This particular book just was not really for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this for my book club and though I would label this a "dark fairy tale", it kept me interested the entire time. The author painted a very vivid picture of this world and keeps you turning pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was an excellent book. Highly recommend.