×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Breaking Blue
     

Breaking Blue

3.8 9
by Timothy Egan
 

See All Formats & Editions

In 1935, the Spokane police regularly extorted sex, food, and money from the reluctant hobos (many of them displaced farmers who had fled the midwestern dust bowls), robbed dairies, and engaged in all manner of nefarious crimes, including murder. This history was suppressed until 1989, when former logger, Vietnam vet, and Spokane cop Tony Bamonte discovered a

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Breaking Blue 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
SFlibres More than 1 year ago
I have read several of Timothy Egan's more recent books, and love his writing style and subjects so much that I went in search of older works.  I really enjoyed this one, and I can't believe I hadn't heard of it before.  A crime committed by one of the "boys in blue" (an officer in the Spokane Police Dept) during the hard days of the Depression is covered up and goes unsolved.  The victim is a cop himself, and his children never learn who killed their father.  The retelling of this nonfiction crime is engrossing in itself, but Egan also introduces us to a present day small town sheriff who decides to write his master's thesis on his sheriff predecessors.  He learns of the unsolved murder and becomes obsessed with solving it.    Revelations of how our upbringing shapes our foibles, how black and white is sometimes gray, and how searching for truth can be alienating and sometimes unrewarding are all themes of this excellently written and engrossing work of nonfiction.  What a talented author!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you live in the Northwest, this book will hold some extra fascination. The references made about life during the Depression are educational. A good enough read.
UnemployedPhilosopheress More than 1 year ago
I love reading about small events that have big implications! This story about the murder of a policeman in Spokane, WA in 1935 might make one think, "Who cares!" But the story is so artfully told, and so full of amazing and sad context, that it's easy to see how it could be applied to our time. Another one in this vein is Philp Gourevitch's A Cold Case. Recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whats wrong carter?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sits on a tree branch and crys in her hands