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Brighton Rock
     

Brighton Rock

3.9 28
by Graham Greene
 

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A gang war rages through the dark underworld of Brighton. Pinkie has killed a man. Believing he can escape retribution, he is unprepared for the courageous, life-embracing Ida Arnold, who is determined to avenge a death.

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Brighton Rock 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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miscliss More than 1 year ago
I am enjoying the book, but the downloaded version has some layout issues. There are random numbers strewn about and some of the sentences are incomplete which takes away from the flow of the story. Obvioulsy, not the writer's fault!
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Jon_B More than 1 year ago
Graham Green takes us back to the quaint seaside resort town of Brighton as he knew it in the early 1930's, a colorful town known for it's hard sugary candy (the "Brighton Rock" of the title) and colorful locals. The novel follows the young Pinkie Brown as he sets out to make a name for himself as an entrepreneur, selling tickets to watch horse races, learning from the chief businessman of the area, and even finding love along the way! Read this book now if you want to escape from the dreariness and crime and grit of modern life, and escape through Greene's rose-tinted glasses to a gentler age that we've long since left behind.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I recently revisited 'Brighton Rock' several years after a rather unmemorable undergraduate reading, but this time I was simply entranced. Greene paints the character of Pinkie with broad strokes of a melodrama that never seems forced, symbolism that is omnipresent but quite powerfully drawn. A masterpiece!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book in hopes of discovering the mystery of it's character Pinkie who seemed to be a famous fictional person that I had heard metioned somewhere. So, I read it, but I think that I will never truly understand him. However, I think it was worth reading because this is the only book of Graham Greene's that I've read. I may not completely ever understand it but it gives me something to think about. There are different ways at looking at the story, and that's why I think others should read it. Sometimes its your own reactions that gets you thinking, and wondering why you reacted to it that way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first book to ever inspire me. The characters are convincing and alive, the story intriguing from day one, and written with such a pace that the reader can't help being dragged along to the spectacular conclusion. Combines the best bits of The Catcher in the Rye and The Power and the Glory. Read it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The heading says all: this book simply is terrible. It's required reading for some, which is completely cruel to inflict. It is pointless, poorly written, and altogether stupid.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book may be hailed by english teachers but it honestly is a poor piece of literature. Grahm Greene's novel is full of unnecessary details, boarish main characters, a disrespect for religion, and an underlying aura of distaste for England in the time period it is written about. Very disappointing to read and discuss.