×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Buyology: Truth and Lies about Why We Buy
     

Buyology: Truth and Lies about Why We Buy

4.0 50
by Martin Lindstrom, Paco Underhill (Foreword by)
 

See All Formats & Editions

How much do we know about why we buy? What truly influences our decisions in today's message-cluttered world? An eye-grabbing advertisement, a catchy slogan, an infectious jingle? Or do our buying decisions take place below the surface, so deep within our subconscious minds, we're barely aware of them?

In BUYOLOGY, Lindstrom, who was voted one of Time Magazine's

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Buyology 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 48 reviews.
Allison_Cameron More than 1 year ago
I was initially interested in this book because I am familiar with Paco Underhill's work on retail behavior and saw that he wrote the foreword for Buy-ology. Overall, it's a great book that challenges how much we really know about why we buy what we buy.

In a world that is increasingly cluttered with advertisements coming at us from every angle, Lindstrom presents findings from his research that actually peered inside the minds of 2,000 people as they were presented with various forms of advertisements and logos. His findings suggest insight into why some brands work and others don't. He also tells some stories from the ad game with known brands like Calvin Klein and American Idol. It's an interesting read for those who are fascinated by advertisers' constant pursuit of the consumer dollar.

Another fascinating book I devoured this week and highly recommend is The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
Do you buy something because you need it? Umm, perhaps. Did you really want the last item you bought? Maybe. Neuromarketing guru Martin Lindstrom has invested years of research into exploring the reasons why we buy, how we are affected even subconsciously to make a purchase. Of course, this is fascinating information for marketers but it was even more intriguing to me as a consumer (especially in today's economy). Just as biology is a study of living organisms, Buy-Ology is a study of living buyers and sellers.

Breathes there a woman alive who hasn't wondered why on earth she bought a blouse she has yet to wear? Or, at our house a husband who hasn't bought something for his workbench that remains shiny and unused?

Lindstrom brings to light precisely how marketers use science and religion to sell. For instance, just as in religion think of how top selling brands utilize symbols. I can spot my brand of detergent from across a store simply by the symbol on the front of the box, and that symbol elicits a good response from me.

One statement I found a bit intimidating was that we make 90% of our decisions subconsciously or due to a subconscious reaction. I'm still pondering that. I'd really like to think that my buying decisions are made quite consciously with an eye to our budget, but I know that's not so when I remember my tendency to overspend during holiday seasons.

Now, blue is and always been my favorite color. But, I didn't know that the sight of a robin's egg blue Tiffany box made women's hearts beat faster. And, a number of stores and product lines seem to believe that sex sells while Lindstrom says not so.

The data in Buy-Ology isn't at all dry as you may find yourself on quite a few pages. And, Don Leslie's reading makes the discoveries even more enjoyable.

- Gail Cooke
Boisen More than 1 year ago
I¿m probably older than your average reviewer. I was once in advertising several decades ago. And I¿d like to commend the author of Buyology, Mr Martin Lindstrom, on a wonderfully informative and entertaining book. The kind of work we did is light years away from the world Lindstrom has introduced me to in his book. I¿d love to have my time over and compare the strengths of neuromarketing with what we blithely took for market research decades ago. Mind you, it worked for us then. The consumer has changed; the world has changed; we¿re all more closely connected in time and space because of our online and broadcast technologies. The consumer is a different being to the stereo types we worked with. Buyology underlines the social phenomenon that accompanies the communications environment ¿ we have to be understood as individuals rather than stereotypes for advertising to work. And the way to do that is to go back to what makes us all human ¿ the workings of the brain and our inbuilt cultural identities. Buyology is a fascinating study and a great read.
LaurelsAppaloosas More than 1 year ago
Buyology is a fantastic piece written to show humans how they think and act in basic everyday market situations. Lindstrom provides many situations and experiments on the neuroscience of the human mind and applies statistics to show society and marketers on how selling and buying works. Product placement, product colors, pictures on packages, it all has a special role in the buying process that our brain goes through. Studies have shown that it takes on average about two seconds for us to make a purchasing decision. Lindstrom and his crew used EGG and fMRI tools to look even deeper into our minds as consumers. The brain studies conducted expose a vast amount of information on what works and what does not when we shop. Shocking facts about cigarettes and their sales are linked together. He touches on addiction, and why we continue to buy more and more of what we want, even if we know it is hurting us. "...Five weeks later, the team leader, Dr. Calvert, presented me with the results. I was, to put it mildly, startled. Even Dr, Calvert was taken aback by the findings: warning labels on the sides, fronts, and backs of cigarette packs had no effect on suppressing the smokers' cravings at all. Zero. In other words, all those gruesome photographs, government regulations , billions of dollars some 123 countries had invested in nonsmoking campaigns, all amounted, at the end of day, to , well, a big waste of money." (Pg. 14) This was quite interesting on how the cigarette companies are required to put risk labels and health risks on the packages, and some even paste gruesome pictures of blackened lungs on their cigarette boxes; but really, they are not doing anything to the human when purchasing that box of tar. The book also focuses on product placement, and how is has been observed to not work on costumers. Because of TiVO and DVR fast forwarding, companies are loosing time on commercials because people skip them or jump ahead to get to the main show. This has not stopped direct advertisers, because no they are placing products in movies and television shows alike! This ensures that consumers will still see their television stars typing on a mac while drinking a coke, and so on. Lindstrom covers subliminal messaging and how is still works today. In 1957 a producer flashed the picture of a Coca-Cola bottle for less than 1/3000th second on television screens. America was alarmed, and thoughts and lawsuits stirred. In 1957 subliminal messaging practices were banned. Buyology sifts through marketing strategies to discover whether or not subliminal messages are used today in the marketing world around us. Superstition, rituals and why we buy are linked together in Buyology. Along with the truth about personal rituals with products and why we buy them are secretly linked."Subliminal messaging has even been shown to influence how much we are willing to pay for a product." (Pg. 76) A study was conducted on how much more likely one was to pay when served an alcoholic beverage from a waiter that was smiling vs. a frowning or angry waiter. Results? You will have to read to find out. Do our senses have a say in what we buy? When we see that signature robin-egg blue Tiffany boxes, or the smell of a new car? Buyology explores how our senses are fine tuned to color, smells, and touch of various products. Buyology is a must-read for marketers and consumers alike. Readers will swim in an ocean of data that this book has to offer. An excelle
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sarah Spencer More than 1 year ago
Good book, very insightful. However, I could have done without the author using "I" and other arrogant sounding statements so often.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pete_the_ReaderNJ More than 1 year ago
It tends to be wordy but its great material makes it worth it!
DianaKR More than 1 year ago
In my opinion the book was good at explaining main idea that focused on the brain activity and its reaction to the external stimuli such as ads. He brought some interesting points, such as the real effects of the warning on tobacco packages. Lindstrom's voice is clear and enthusiastic. However, I find his book little too vague and repetitive. He did not provided any of the real world applications on how consumers and sellers should apply his theories and methods or something that would be of much interest and utility in today's world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago