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The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children #1)
     

The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children #1)

4.5 746
by Jean M. Auel
 

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This eBook includes the full text of the novel plus the following additional content:

• An exclusive preview chapter from Jean M. Auel's The Land of Painted Caves, on sale in hardcover March 29, 2011
• An Earth's Children© series sampler including free chapters from the other books in Jean M. Auel's bestselling series

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The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children #1) (Enhanced Edition) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 747 reviews.
MagiV More than 1 year ago
So sad - I have all of this series in hard copy, but really wanted them on my new Nook, especially with the new Land of the Painted Caves coming out next month! I started reading at the beginning, and was immediately struck by how AWFUL the translation to eBook had been - NEVER occurred to me that B&N didn't get access to the electronic files which the printers use when printing up new books, right? - NEVER occurred to me these books were OCRed, which means that many times the words are incorrect or missing. There are formatting issues like italics where it does not belong, a sentence that runs right off the page of the Nook never wrapping around. Punctuation that was incorrect or completely missing. And, unlike the old classics, we have to PAY for this. I actually needed to use my hard copy to be sure of what I was reading - in each edition! I wrote a letter of disgust to B&N, and was told - in short, that my issues were being sent on to the publisher and when they made corrections, it would automatically be uploaded to my Nook - BUT, that I was not entitled to any kind of refund per B&N blah, blah, blah.... Very sad. I have many other books on my Nook that are 10 & 20 years old yet there are no "typos" in those books. Be warned!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My father read the books, and everytime he read a few chapters, he went into my room to tell me all about it. After he finished, he gave the books to me. I was fifteen, and layed them away for a year. After that year I found them again, and read the first page. I almost read the entire chapter there, down of the floor in front of my bookcase. I have never before and probably will never again fall in love with a book as much as I did with these. And especially The Clan of the Cavebear. I've just read it for the eleventh time (for real!) and still found things I missed the first times. These books opened my eyes to the full experience of reading a book. Not only reading, but seeing, feeling, living and breathing a book. I can absolutely recommend it to everyone, although you do have to consider all the extra text concerning the environment and animals present. I loved them, I love to learn, but others will find it difficult to read long descriptions. In any way, it is a book worth reading, more than most are!
FosterHope More than 1 year ago
I first read this book years ago, and it impacted by adult reading choices more than any other book I've read. This story draws you in, to another time, to another person, to another way of thinking. This book is less tedious than Auel's later books, more meat to the story, less descriptive fluff.
turlisa More than 1 year ago
I first read Clan of the Cave Bear about 20 yrs ago. It was a book that I put aside and said I would read only if I got desperate enough to pick it up. Well I did, and imagine my surprise when I found it to be then and now one of my most favorite series ever. I have followed Ayla through the Clan to the Zelandonii and am anxiously awaiting the new book coming out in March, Land of the Painted Caves. I truly hope that this is NOT the end of the earth children series. It is long overdue. My only critisism of this eBook, and the series that continue is that they have been poorly proof read. I found mistakes everywhere, and was highly disappointed. Things like "Life" being typed as Ufe. "rime" instead of "time" and so on. Either way, if you can get past the typos, it is a very good read and I highly recommend it.
bbb57 More than 1 year ago
This is easily one of the best books ever written. Captivating, exhilirating, informative, the list of accolades is too long to list. I read this book in two sittings. And I read it again. One of my top five favorite books of all time. And then you get to read Valley of the Horses, which is even better!!!!!!! But you can stop after Book 2 (Valley of the Horses), because starting with the third book (The Mammoth Hunters), Ms. Auel is simply completing a contract. The Mammoth Hunter is all humping and horticulture, soap opera drama, cold weather and that is it. Books 4-6 are even worse, and a total waste of time and money.
SophieSimon More than 1 year ago
Ayla is born to "the Others" but after a natural disaster she is orphaned, and found, almost dying, by the Clan of the Cave Bear. She is eventually adopted by the clan and has to adjust to her new family and environment. The challenge is overwhelming for such a little girl. She is often cast out and faces many trials, but she shows courage, strength and determination that make her unique as a character. Although she will never truly fit with the clan, she develops many special relationships with its members. The affection between Ayla and her new family-- Creb, the shaman, and Iza, the medicine woman-- is heart warming to read. Although perhaps she is not realistic as a character of the time period (prehistoric Europe), Ayla is a well-developed character with such a unique story. The reader really feels as if they understand her struggles, and well as those of the clan, who have their own primal culture unlike anything we've ever seen. I really enjoyed reading this novel.
Meg_Espey More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the best books I have ever read. It gives wonderful descriptions of the hardships early people had to go through to stay alive. Ayla is a headstrong woman and I love that she can take care of herself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have only read this book of the series but I am dying to get my hands on the others!!! I have never read a book that caused me to think so much about the way of the world and to cry as much as i did with this book. while I was reading this book I would stay up late into the night sobbing my eyes out for poor little Ayla. THIS IS TRULY THE MOST TOUCHING BOOK EVER WRITTEN!!!
Britt_IA More than 1 year ago
I read this book long ago but was so excited to hear about the newer release by Jean for this series that I revisited. The second time around wasn't any less enjoyable. If you like historical fiction, this is the book for you. Romance, history, vivid characters, unique story line - I appreciate all of it.
Read_the_Journey More than 1 year ago
21 years ago this series began and I was so moved by the strength and insight of Ayla, it gave me courage as a girl becoming a woman in high school. I read this book more times than I can count and was personally incensed at the movie attempt; first for the dilution of Jean Auel's incredible written word and second for the revolting maudlin screen interpretation. If you were unfortunate enough to see only the movie, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE do NOT let it deter you from stepping into Ayla's time and travels to explore her world. I remember distinctly the joy of hearing paleontological discoveries that prove the detailed research she devoted to spin a tale of heart, history, and perseverance.
ToReadPerchancetoDream More than 1 year ago
Clan of the Cave Bear is the first book in Jean M. Auel's Earth Children Series. It was first published in 1980. I read this book sometime in the 1990s and remember liking it a lot. I didn't get the same warm fuzzy feelings reading it the second time around. I'm not sure if it's my 20 year age difference, the style of writing then vs now, or what it might be. The story is refreshingly unique and drew me in immediately. My interest waned as Auel spent so much time describing everything. Not just the environment, but the people as well. Show me, don't tell me. Let me see what a character is like by what they say and do instead of so much descriptive text. It made some of the characters fall flat. A saving grace in this novel is the relationships. It was obvious by their actions how much Iza and Creb cared for Ayla and how she loved them. The difference in their appearances didn't matter. That's a lesson we all need to remember. Clan of the Cave Bear is an intriguing story, not one you find everywhere in these days of vampires and zombies. I think it's worth the read.
TigerLionLeopard More than 1 year ago
From the first book in the series "The Clan of the Cave Bear" by Jean M. Auel I have been an avid fan of the Earth's Children books. Always looked forward to the next book in the series.
Nook_Reader83 More than 1 year ago
I'd read many similar stories over the years, but somehow missed this series. When I noticed others' stories clearly referencing this series I decided it was time to read "the original" and I'm glad I did. Not a quick read, obviously, as it's huge. Guess it's a good thing I've always favored long stories for their (usually) greater capacity for character development. :)
Yaca More than 1 year ago
I loved this book from beginning to the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book! I'm reading the series for the first time and am amazed by how good the story is. The characters are great, the descriptions are amazing, and the plot has a hook that I hardly ever see in a book. 5 stars!
Landry More than 1 year ago
Happy to have this one in my library. Highly Recommended.
Rayna Hathcox More than 1 year ago
The books have an amazing amount of detail and heartwarming story lines. It makes you want to just jump in and go through the story with the characters themselves! Every book is just as amazing as the first. (6 books in total, I have read every one multiple times)
Linda Montano More than 1 year ago
I started reading this as an homage to my dad- this was his favorite series... I only wish I'd started sooner because it is such an engaging story that captures your heart from the start. I am happily addicted to continuing Ayla's story and rooting for her until the very end- I'm halfway thru the series and am glad my dad loved her story and piqued my interest in the Clan of the Cave Bear books.
MirahLee More than 1 year ago
My Mother first bought me The Clan of The Cave Bear in 1989, about 6 years after it was first published. I was 10 years old. I read it, and fell in love. I've fallen back in love with the story each and every time I've read it, which I have faithfully done at least once a year for the past 22 years. I feel as if I've grown up with Ayla, and Auel's beautiful descriptions and storytelling continue throughout the series. I've treasured each and every book, and have waited in anticipation for YEARS for each new installment to come out. I've spent most of my childhood and all of my adulthood (so far, I'm only 31) awaiting the next chapter in the saga. I'm excited to read the final story, but sad that I won't have another one to look forward to as it is said this will be the final book. This is truly a literary masterpiece, for young and old alike. Thank you Jean Auel for bringing this story to us, and for giving me decades of enjoyment!
Guest More than 1 year ago
When at the age of 13 I was presented with the first of the four books it was the start of a reading frenzy. Anyboby who has shared the experiance who agree, the series literary sweeps you into the prehistoric world Auel created. These books were an important instrument in sparkling a desire to create my own world were the culture is as rich and vibrant and real. I am now 23 and writing as much as time permits and I say thankyou Jean M Auel for helping to send me down this path.
PriPri 10 months ago
There are possibly spoilers in this review, but not so much to ruin the book for anyone, at least I don't think so. First, Ayla was an incredible character. She was born of the Others, but found and raised by the Clan. I can almost understand her plight a bit, as a black girl who grew up in predominately white neighborhoods and schools, I know what it was like to be the odd man out. To have people stare at you because you look different, to be treated as though you didn't belong. But there was always a person(s) who looked at you for who you were. Ayla found that in Iza, Creb, Uba, and many others. Iza loved her more than her biological daughter and Creb loved her as if she was his daughter as well. Uba loved her like a sister. She proved that though she looked and even had different feelings and emotions, she could love and learn and work just like everyone else in the Clan. In a lot of ways she was better than the Clan. She didn't have their inherited memories, but she could learn and comprehend things that they couldn't. Creb knew it and it frightened him. I think he knew all along that the coming of the Others would mean the end of the Clan. I didn't expect the amount abuse that she endured. Having watched the movie, can I just say it was a sad, sad representation of this book! She endured hate and ostracism and just flat out physical and emotional abuse--particularly from Broud, who was also not like the typical clan. He hated Ayla because she was not of the Clan; she looked and behaved differently. She was stronger and braver, and smarter than him and he envied her that. But that is not the way of the clan. He had violent tendencies and exhibited jealousy and yearned for revenge. Broud was very egotistical and cared more about his estimation of himself than he did the well-being of the Clan. These were definitely not traits of the Clan, so for as much as he despised Ayla for her differences, he was equally as different. The Clan had very short life spans, they became men and hunters, women and mothers very, very young. Boys were hunters at 12 and some women were mothers at 10. They became physically old and died young as well. If a member of the Clan made it to their 30's it was ancient! For some people the ages at which certain events took place could be considered shocking, but to me it makes sense. They were cavemen. They lived hard, short lives; their brains and bodies were not developed the way people are today. They were short and bowlegged and barely stood upright. They were very stout with thick bones and protruding brows. Their brains were made for instinct and the memories they inherited at birth; they couldn't really learn new things, or think in new and critical ways. Ayla was thin and tall with straight legs and a 'flat' brow. She didn't develop into the Clan's expectation of womanhood until much later, and I expect she (and the Others) have a longer lifespan. She didn't have the same memories and instincts, but she could think for herself, and question things. Creb knew she was bright, but didn't think she was as smart as him. I think she was smarter. She just didn't have his life experiences to draw from. I loved that Ayla was strong despite what Broud did to her over the years. For every rotten, hateful, and abusive thing he did to her, she came out of it a little stronger and braver than before... (rest of review cut off by character limits)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MY NAME IS Ayla TOO
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all the books in the Earth Children saga. I was delighted with the presentation of that society. The characters are well defined and realistic. The story line continues through the books keeping you waiting to see what happens next to the main characters. Well written excellent reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago