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Cold Case
     

Cold Case

4.8 6
by Julia Platt Leonard
 

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When 13-year-old Oz Keillor finds a dead body in his family restaurant, he is soon caught up in a mystery where the stakes are high. His older brother is the prime suspect, and Oz quickly finds out that the murder may be tied to the death of their father years earlier, who was accused of selling nuclear secrets to rouge governments.

With the fate of his family

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Cold Case 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After an attention grabbing beginning, I thought it drug a bit. But the ending was a page turner. I really liked Rusty and wished she had been in the book even more. I hope there will be another book with these characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a good mystery book. At the beginning, it was suspensful. The ending was shocking to me. This us a must-read! This book is good to use for school projects. Buy it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(If you haven’t read this book, spoilers are included!) I believe that people should definitely check out the book Cold Case by Julia Platt Leonard for many reasons. The main character, the plot and irony, and the relationships built around the main character in are probably the main reasons why I strongly suggest young adults or middle-high school students to read this book. Mentioned in an earlier post written by Angie on www.goodreads.com, she states, “I don't think (wouldn't know for sure, would I?) bad guys explain everything. Mentally going through in my head ... and I just really don't think they do. Will consider more specific examples but the way the final ending plays out was just a little bit contrived. Perhaps narrowing down the suspect pool just a bit. There are a couple characters in the story who's only real job seems to be red herring. A little misdirection is fun. Too much and it starts to wear on the credibility of the story....” I disagree with this post. Firstly, even though in real life it may not be too frequent that bad guys explain everything including their motives, but I feel like it was necessary to have the bad guy explain everything at the end that way it would make sense to the reader and so they would understand the purpose. Secondly, I disagree on how this person said that the suspect pool was too big and that it wore on the credibility of the story. Having a few suspects made the book more interesting to find out who it was, and to not make the real suspect so obvious so you would get surprised at the end. My favorite character had to be the narrator, Oz Keiller. At 13 years old, he is a pretty intelligent boy and a good choice for a narrator and protagonist for this story. Having him be the narrator was interesting and helpful because it gives a point of view from someone around the same age as the readers and he is the one person who is caught in the complete middle of all the ‘drama’ contained in the book. During the story, he is forced to be in situations that for some, aren’t so appropriate for kids his age- for example being the first to find two dead bodies and having that sight imbedded in his brain forever. At some points, he has to run his family restaurant practically by himself and skip school to investigate other people related to the murder case and at the same time try to figure out how the murder was linked to what happened to his father years and years ago. Also, he has to take on the task of solving the murder of Sneider all by himself with the help of one of his friends. (Spoiler, he does solve the case!!) He is a pretty nice character, and has good relationships with the people around him. He is a dynamic character, he changes his thoughts on his dad from the beginning of his dad to the end and also builds up much courage and responsibility. I enjoyed this book particularly because of the plot and the irony at the end. Long story short, Oz, the main character, is trying to solve the mystery of Sneider’s murder while also trying to clear his brother from being the main suspect. Then, Harrison, who is a man running for senate, tricks Oz at the end and spontaneously tries to kill him, revealing that he’s “sapphire” (sapphire is the codename used by the person who revealed false information about Oz’s dad ten years ago and made him look like a spy/terrorist.) The resolution is that they figure out that Oz’s dad and Dave, Oz’s brother, were innocent. Harrison and Razor, (who was basical
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Omg i cant even explain how good this book is in the end youll be shocked
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nice book ,i loved it!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THIS WAS THE BEST BOOK IVE EVER IN MY 12 YEARS OF AGE HAVE EER READ AND I READ EVERYDAY BESBOOK EVER CANT WAIT FOR MORE