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The Conspiracy Club
     

The Conspiracy Club

3.2 36
by Jonathan Kellerman
 

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
 
When his passionate romance with nurse Jocelyn Banks is cut short by her kidnapping and brutal murder, young psychologist Jeremy Carrier is left emotionally devastated, haunted by his lover’s grisly demise—and eyed warily by police still seeking a prime suspect in the slaying.
 

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Conspiracy Club 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm thoroughly disappointed. I expect a lot more out of this prolific writer. I thought I'd be thrilled get to know new characters, but I wasn't. 86 Dr. Carrier and Angela. The story never got off the ground. I finished the book because I hoped that it would get better. It didn't. Bring back the page turners with Alex and Milo!
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a huge Kellerman fan I was excited to read something with new characters..it turns out that I should have stuck with the usual Kellerman fare. The storyline was mediocre at best and I felt nothing for the characters..I missed Alex and Milo. I look forward to the next Delaware or Petra book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good mystery great characters you care about. I couldnt put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Frankslc More than 1 year ago
One of his best books. I really enjoyed the characters in this book. A great read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love a good mystery novel but this story dragged on. To many unnecessary tangents. Sorry and not a extremely thoughtful ending either.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although "The Conspiracy Club" doesn't include an all-time favorite, Alex Delaware, we're introduced to a likeable, young psychologist named Jeremy Carrier. In this story, he is psychologically put through his paces, and once the momentum begins to build, the reader is almost as caught up in the intrigue as the hero. When we meet Jeremy, he is recovering from the vicious murder of his fiancée, Jocelyn Banks, a nurse at Central City Hospital where he also works. He is typically considered a suspect by the police, and although they later leave him alone because of the lack of evidence, one of the detectives, Steve Hoker, continues to pursue him throughout the novel in an indirect way. Jeremy has become totally absorbed in his job and is considered a favorite of all who come into contact with him. He has a special healing talent that patients respond to and a charisma that doesn't escape Angelo Rios, a resident physician. She and Jeremy eventually become lovers. Meanwhile, an older doctor on staff, Arthur Chess, a pathologist and director of a weekly meeting Jeremy attends, approaches Jeremy one day in the doctors' dining room. Chess's overture confuses Jeremy because the older man's manner is unusual, and Jeremy doesn't see the point of their conversation. As time goes on, however Jeremy realizes that Chess is involving him in a clever and elaborate mind game, and the symbolic name of Chess doesn't go unnoticed by the reader. Still, the point of the game eludes Jeremy, although he is caught up in the mystery and is determined to follow it though. He is introduced to Chess's friends at a bizarre late-night supper and then abruptly ignored completely by the older doctor and the rest of the group. When Chess leaves the hospital temporarily to travel, Jeremy is given strange clues via interoffice correspondence to something that momentarily baffles him. He thinks the messages are coming from Chess, but the fact that he's abroad only confounds the issue. Jeremy is hooked nevertheless. He suspects that Chess's dinner companions may be in on the project and are acting in his behalf. Occational postcards from Chess offer further clues to something hidden. Finally, the twists and turns expose a symmetry and enlightenment that amaze Jeremy. He connects the dots to reveal an evil side to two other doctors on staff and a vulnerability shared by Chess and his friends. The clues he has received plunge Jeremy deeply into their secrets and his own psyche and ultimately point to a cathartic release for Jeremy. For readers who enjoy winding through a maze, this book is recommended for the sheer intricacy of it. Once more, Kellerman performs his magic.
Mystery7 More than 1 year ago
One of his best.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Contrary to the other reviews shown here, I thought the book was a success... Even though written as a stand-alone book, I would read another about Dr. Jeremy Carrier or Arthur Chess and the CCC. As an avid reader of the Alex Delaware series, I appreciated Kellerman's deviation from the norm.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not impressed at all with this book. It was extremely slow and boring. Just when you expected something exciting to happen, nothing did. The book did not flow like it should have. I don't think it was completely horrid, but it is definately not on my Favorite Books List. Kellerman didn't begin to develop his characters until at least 50 pages in to the novel. I was expecting more from a book call The Conspiracy Club. To me there wasn't much of a conspiracy. For real conspiracy read The Da Vinci Code or The Rule of Four.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was ready not to like this book after reading all these reviews, but decided to give it the benefit of the doubt. I was pleasantly surprised. Although this one is slower paced than the Delaware whodunits, I found this story line more intriguing and interesting. I liked the fact that we learned about the club slowly as part of the story. I liked the characters and thought he did a good job developing them throughout the book. Overall, it's not one of those 'can't put it down', but it's a very satisfying read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Contrary to most of the reviews, I enjoyed Kellerman's departure from the norm. The characters are well-developed and I did not think this story dragged. It is not a long novel and Kellerman spaced the twists and turns to my satisfaction. I have not read a complete Alex Delaware novel but will do so after reading this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although the first half of the book is slow-paced, its short chapters were absolutely necessary in order to prevent one from totally giving up on the story! Once past that, the story picks up pace to reward the reader with a novel that is worth exploring to the end.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was absolutely bored with this novel. I read the last 100 pages in one sitting just so I wouldn't have to open the book again. It seems you're waiting for something to happen and when it does you have one page left in the book. Very Dissapointed