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Daughters of the Revolution
     

Daughters of the Revolution

2.7 10
by Carolyn Cooke
 

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In 1968, a clerical mistake threatens the prestigious but cash-strapped Goode School in the small New England town of Cape Wilde. After a century of all-male, old-boy education, the school accidentally admits its first female student:  Carole Faust, a brilliant, outspoken, fifteen-year-old black girl whose arrival will have both an immediate and

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Daughters of the Revolution 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Lynie More than 1 year ago
Goddard (God) Byrd is the philandering headmaster of the all-male Goode School, a financially struggling prep school. Despite tradition and God's personal aversion to coeducation, Carole Faust, a brilliant, young and rebellious black woman has been admitted as a scholarship student through a clerical oversight. The lives of Lil Hellman, a young widow, and her small child EV are interwoven with God's and Carole's in this coming of age story that richly encompasses the changing times, from the Kennedy assassination through civil unrest and the sexual revolution. Surrounded by young people, especially young women, who are embracing newly forged freedoms, God's unwillingness or inability to accept the shifting dynamics of the world around him deftly mirrors the struggles of the era. While reading DAUGHTERS OF THE REVOLUTION, I was in awe of the author's ability to bring to such vivid life the political and social turbulence of the '60s through the early '80s. Ms. Cooke's achingly beautiful and intelligent prose makes DAUGHTERS OF THE REVOLUTION a delightful and powerful literary gem. Lynn Kimmerle
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1968 in Cape Wilde, New England, The Goode School welcomes only male offspring of affluent families. As racial and gender barriers are under assault, headmaster Goddard "God" Byrd refuses to allow the other weaker sex entrance to his school. However, a double shocker occurs through a typo when fifteen years old Negro female Carole Faust receives a scholarship. The school faculty, alumni, family members and students are divided over the brilliant radical girl while God is in a 24/7 rage. At the same time, Goode alumnus Heck Hellman drowns leaving behind his wife Lil and their little girl Ev who no longer meet the school's economic criteria. This is a superb historical novel that focuses on the social unrest of the late 1960s with timely comparisons to the present. The cast is powerful as Carolyn Cooke insures the diverse opinions are handled with respect even that of God who may be an anachronism today but not then; as the author avoids caricatures. Satirically mocking the boomers whose good intentions reform has led to an outcome of the greatest economic division ever between the upper class and the rest in this country, Daughters of the Revolution reflects that the social reform movements of a past remain very relevant today. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Based on the cover and description, I thought it would be more about adapting to life in the 60's & 70's, which can be written very interestingly. The chapters are short and makes a quick read, but it just lacked a good story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
kcordella More than 1 year ago
I had high hopes for this book, since it was a "if you liked, you will also like..." recommendation. I was hooked by the sample. The beginning is a fabulous read. The author builds a connection to an interesting family with intriguing issues. Unfortunately, the book begins its decline with the introduction of Carole and never recovers. I was even more disappointed with its ending. Sorry.
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