×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Decoding the Universe: How the New Science of Information Is Explaining Everythingin the Cosmos, fromOur Brains to Black Holes
  • Alternative view 1 of Decoding the Universe: How the New Science of Information Is Explaining Everythingin the Cosmos, fromOur Brains to Black Holes
  • Alternative view 2 of Decoding the Universe: How the New Science of Information Is Explaining Everythingin the Cosmos, fromOur Brains to Black Holes
     

Decoding the Universe: How the New Science of Information Is Explaining Everythingin the Cosmos, fromOur Brains to Black Holes

3.2 7
by Charles Seife
 

See All Formats & Editions

The author of Zero explains the scientific revolution that is transforming the way we understand our world

Previously the domain of philosophers and linguists, information theory has now moved beyond the province of code breakers to become the crucial science of our time. In Decoding the Universe, Charles Seife draws on his gift for making

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Decoding the Universe: How the New Science of Information Is Explaining Everythingin the Cosmos, fromOur Brains to Black Holes 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book eloquently describes Quantum physics and information theory and how it relates to the structure of the universe and everyday events. His ability to delve into entropy, logarithms, quantum mechanics,, black holes and the structure of the Universe in a no esoteric fashion is incredible and should be praised. he book is very informative and I recommend it for both casual readers and those with a serious interest in the topics of Quantum physics and information sciences
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Horrible
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stephen_Zaddikman More than 1 year ago
Were it not for the sloppy and poorly thought out ninth chapter this book would have been a masterpiece of science writing. Charles Seife is able to explain confusing concepts such a entropy, quantum mechanics, qubits, and black holes with a clarity, understanding, and skill which is, to say the least, extremely rare. This young man is a powerful writer with an unobtrusive style and a deep understanding of science-- a marriage of abilities made in heaven. If "Decoding the Universe" had ended with chapter eight things might have been different. The reader had already been taken for a tour of thermodynamics (illustrated by the idea of randomly rowing marbles into a box and calculating bell curve distributions), the information theory of Claude Shannon and Rolf Landauer and Charles Bennett, the role of information in special relativity, the meaning of superposition and discoherence in quantum mechanics, and the nature of entanglement and the EPR thought experiment. But once we pass the opening pages of the chapter nine, we are launched into a discussion of how the universe is infinite and then, later, we are told that the universe is dying (even though it is infinite and can't die). Then we are told about the many worlds theory which Seife seems to confuse with Vilikin's infinite inflation bublle theory. How can a text that is so good fall into such incoherence (as opposed to discoherence)? It is almost as if the book had to be finished in ten minutes or an hour and the author threw some notes together to make a final chapter. Also, chapter eight ends with a confession that entanglement cannot be explained by physics. Then in the last chapter he throws in an undigested mass of notes on Everett and David Deutsch and proposes that superposition and entanglement can be understood if we allow that the universe splits in half each time nature (or man) takes a measurement of multistate particles. Earlier in the book there is an interesting discussion of whether the brain is a quantum computer, an idea entertained by Sir Roger Penrose in a trilogy of books. But no, says Seife, quoting Max Tegmark, the neurons in the brain are orders of magnitude slower than the rate of discoherence which is nothing more than the rate that photons and other particles strike the neuro-chemicals. They could never sustain a state of superposition long enough to function as qubits-- the brain must be a classical computing device. I would like to hear what Sir Roger has to say about this. All in all I admire Mr Seife's work. His weakness is that he is poorly trained in philosophy and theology. But he will learn and grow and one day I expect to see a magnum opus from his hand. **Stephen Zaddikmann