×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Dimiter
     

Dimiter

3.8 31
by William Peter Blatty
 

See All Formats & Editions

William Peter Blatty has thrilled generations of readers with his iconic mega-bestseller The Exorcist. Now Blatty gives us Dimiter, a riveting story of murder, revenge, and suspense. Laced with themes of faith and love, sin and forgiveness, vengeance and compassion, it is a novel in the grand tradition of the great Catholic novels of the 20th Century.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Dimiter 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Kindle-be-damned More than 1 year ago
This novel is like none other I have read. The opening chapters are moody and mysterious and the writing is quite beautiful. We are quickly introduced to the story's central character, "Dimiter," who then recedes into the backround as the scene shifts from Albania to Jerusalem. Only gradually do we see what his place is in this second half, and the key role he plays in the story as a whole. The plot is not a simple one. Several narrative threads are created along more or less parallel lines, then dropped for a time, only to be picked up and concluded later in the book. Eventually, all of these strands are woven together and a startling picture emerges. I won't spoil your read by revealing what that picture is. I will say, however, that it is most unusual as well as uplifting in a completely unexpected way. If I were to point out any drawback to the book as a whole, I would say that the second half seems somewhat shortened compared to the first. And I enjoyed the story and the quality of the writing so much that I would have been preferred to see the story extended for several more chapters. As it is, however, the pace is quick and the tension builds until the "mystery" of Dimiter is revealed. This is not a book for everyone, however. I think you have to love fine writing and be interested in exploring some pretty serious subjects, like the nature of God's involvement (if any) in this world and the extent to which violent acts can conceivably be justified in the name of a "good" God to fully appreciate it. This book tackles some weighty topics much in the way that "The Exorcist" (also by Blatty) does, but the stories are not similar otherwise. And anyone who picks up this book expecting spinning heads or pea soup will be disappointed. If memory serves, this book is darker and more serious in tone than "The Exorcist", despite the many surprising humorous exchanges between some of the characters in the second half. (Surprising to see on the book's dust jacket that the author has written several humorous books and screenplays, including "A Shot in the Dark", one of the first Inspecter Clouseau films.) And while I can't say that it has changed my mind about God or any of the topics mentioned above, it has certainly made me think more deeply about them. This is a book that almost demands a second reading, because there are many subtle, almost subconscious clues regarding the climax scattered throughout the earlier chapters. In addition, the main characters in the Jerusalem section of the book possess a depth which one does not usually encounter in a "thriller" of this kind. In short, I highly recommend this book, but be prepared to be challenged and have your thinking cap on and fully-charged when you sit down to read it. Meanwhile, buy the hardcover. Kindle be damned!
SheilaCE More than 1 year ago
During 1973, a mysterious figure is taken captive in the totalitarian state of Albania and interrogated by authorities using extreme methods of torture. Impervious to pain and unwilling to speak about his true identity, the prisoner confounds his captors until his remarkable escape. One year later, a series of strange occurrences that include the unexplainable healing of a boy with an incurable condition and the discovery of a body in Christ's tomb have gained the attention of local authorities and intelligence officials. In their struggle to understand this enigmatic case, they discover a plot that is utterly confounding in its complexity. And at the center of it there is a man without an identity, a man who is very dangerous. He is called Dimiter, the Agent of Hell. Dimiter, a fascinating and well-crafted suspense novel, is the newest release by William Peter Blatty, the author of the horror classic The Exorcist. Its mystery has a depth that will captivate readers until its final pages. With imagination and eloquence, William Peter Blatty writes Dimiter, a story that is sure to have mystery-lovers and suspense enthusiasts enthralled for some time to come.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1973 in Albania, security chief Colonel Vlora the "Interrogator" works to break a prisoner suspected of being an American agent. He and his experts torture the Prisoner in ways the Spanish Inquisition would never of imagined, but the source of their assault never even screams once; instead he takes everything slammed at him in total silence. Even more shocking to his hosts, "the Prisoner" does the impossible; he escapes and completes his mission. At Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem, a series of unexplained deaths shake up the staff. Christian Arab police detective Peter Meral leads the investigation that seems to be going nowhere. Whereas Americans and Israelis struggle with the happenings, none yet know that the Albanian Prisoner, Paul Dimiter is in the Holy City doing what he does best causing hell. This is not an easy read as the exciting story line seems incoherent when suddenly like a magician William Peter Blatty brilliantly brings it together in a thrilling psychological suspense thriller. Dimiter is an eerie individual who has figuratively lost his soul (not in a horror novel - Exorcist sense) but seeks some form of redemption. Readers will relish the shocking truths as to who he is and why Albania (ask Ho Chi Minh about him) and then Jerusalem. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thoroughly enjoyed this novel!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Timothy Wilson More than 1 year ago
I couldn't put this book down once I started. Blatty has an immersive style of writing that sucks you in right from the go.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago