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The Disagreement
     

The Disagreement

3.6 6
by Nick Taylor
 

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It is April 17, 1861 — the day that Virginia secedes from the Union and the sixteenth birthday of John Alan Muro. As the Commonwealth erupts in celebration, young Muro sees his dream of attending medical school in Philadelphia shattered by the sudden reality of war.

Muro's father, believing that the Disagreement will pass, sends his son instead to

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Disagreement 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For a first-time novelist Nick Taylor attempts a daunting subject: the training of a young doctor during the American Civil War at the University of Virginia Hospital in Charlottesville. I've read any number of novels and historical texts from the same era, and this is the first detailed piece I seen on the organization and work in a Confederate hospital. I particularly enjoyed the details provided for the conversation from traditional pharmacy to earlier, plant-based treatments. At the same time, it appears that much of the original manuscript was cut by editors, or Taylor simply didn't delve into material that would have made for a more complete novel. For example, although the medical staff was always on the alert for patients from battlefields, very little information is provided on which battles they were and locations. Gettysburg, a bloodbath if there ever was one, is given scant reference on the enormity of the battle and patients sent to hospitals. Indeed, it appears to be a distant shadow to the story rather than the death blow to the Confederacy. Instead, much of the story revolves around the social life of the central character, his dating relationship and marriage to a young women that ends up like a series of Jerry Springer episodes. Additionally, a charismatic roommate and close friend becomes embroiled in a legel trouble and the issue disappears from the story with little importance after lengthy description. These aspects of the book are especially challenging, given the endless list of novels and movies of the sterotypical South. There are other sections of the novel where lengthy details and descriptions are made, but after interesting development the subjects disappear from the story again, poor editing. But Taylor has talent, and it's obvious he enjoys researching under-reported subjects. Let's hope his next novel is not cut too deeply so we can enjoy the full effects of the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is wonderful.I loved it.Everyone should buy this book By Nick Taylor.This is my dads girlfriends brother and he worked so hard on it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Quite exceptionally interesting with vivid characters. The romance was tangible, the period well-developed...although I would have preferred more historic details, but that is purely personal preference. I could smell a modern-day sweat on this historic piece -- not sure if this was the intention of the author. I bought this book after stumbling upon the author's reading at our local bookstore. Aside from an obnoxious wife in the crowd peddling the book like a mad, silly, insincere saleswoman, the reading was delightful. The author was well-spoken, charismatic, and gifted per the reading. Catch the reading, if he's in your city.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The main character is a young man who is raised in peacetime. He becomed a doctor and is treating disease and wounded patients dying all the time. This never really seems to touch him much. As critical care nurse and the reader of many civil war diaries I found this annoying. I feel the author should have spent some time in a trauma center and watched the news.