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The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History
     

The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History

3.5 12
by Jonathan Franzen
 

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The Discomfort Zone is Jonathan Franzen's memoir of growing up squirming in his own uber-sensitive skin, from a "small and fundamentally ridiculous person," through a strangely happy adolescence, into an adult with strong and inconvenient passions. His story cascades from moments of high drama into multilayered fields of sometimes truculent, sometimes piercing,

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The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
SuzeJones58 More than 1 year ago
Franzen's opening is strong, the memior achieves a nice arc in his adolescent years and then poof! it kind of dissolves into a desalotury whine about birding and the environment. Altogether, the ending pages may make sense in light of how the author describes his early life...hey! hes's a sensitive guy! If two-thirds of a book is interesting to the point of being difficult to set down, does that make it worthwhile to read? In this case, I vote 'yes.' Reading about Franzen's high school years is a lot of fun. It's about hijinks, cute excuses and reminiscent of a particular time in the 70's. The paperback doesn't cost much, so the price is a good bargain for the entertainment and insight value.
SamanthaCopping More than 1 year ago
Perhaps the best memoir I've read. At one point Franzen offers a description of adolescence that is so perfectly profound and incisive that it alone makes the book worth reading. As others have noted the ending is a bit of a departure, but it's still wonderful. I'd highly recommend it whether your'e familiar with Franzen's work or not.
second_haze More than 1 year ago
This memoir is wonderful. It is so personal and obviously honest, and he tells each little memory in such a way that we can almost remember them ourselves. They become our memories, because what they ultimately describe are universal feelings of growing up.
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