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The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography, from the Revolution to the First World War
     

The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography, from the Revolution to the First World War

3.4 9
by Graham Robb
 

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"A witty, engaging narrative style....[Robb's] approach is particularly engrossing."—New York Times Book Review, front-page review
A narrative of exploration—full of strange landscapes and even stranger inhabitants—that explains the enduring fascination of France. While Gustave Eiffel was changing the skyline of Paris, large parts of France were

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The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography, from the Revolution to the First World War 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an absolutely fascinating study of the bits and pieces of France before they became the culture we think France has always been. I had no idea. I am riveted. I can picture this, too, having driven many French backroads and listened to dialects I can't understand. I will now think about France in a new way, and I'll never think of it again as I did before I read this book. Masterful research, analysis, and writing. Required reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the most engaging works of nonfiction I have ever read. Many little known facts relating to the very conflicted French identity which I suspect many Americans(and Europeans) will find explainss a lot of things that have always made us uncomfortable about the French people and culture.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book lacked a theme or an organizational thread. The author advocated learning more about the real history of rural France by traveling at bicycle speeds; there was no geographic or historical way he transitioned from one area or time to another. As a result, you were forced to turn to the map at the beginning of the book to determine which area or small town he was talking about, but after awhile, it got so depressing I didn't bother. It was drudgery to get through the book. I have lived in southern France (Bouches-du-Rhone) twice for a total of 18 months; both during professional exchanges. I couldn't disagree more with the author's assessment of the warmth of the people. However, there were some aspects the author revealed of "why people are the way they are" that I had experienced but not understood. My interpretation of those characteristics at the time, and even today, was far less sinister than the author's.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The information about France is here but the writing is so convoluted that getting it is a chore. There must be better books about France than this one.
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