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Duty and Desire (Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman Trilogy, #2)
     

Duty and Desire (Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman Trilogy, #2)

4.2 66
by Pamela Aidan
 

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³There was little danger of encountering the Bennet sisters ever again.²

Jane Austen's classic novel Pride and Prejudice is beloved by millions, but little is revealed in the book about the mysterious and handsome hero, Mr. Darcy. And so the question has long remained: Who is Fitzwilliam Darcy?

Pamela Aidan's trilogy

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Duty and Desire (Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman Trilogy, #2) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 62 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading the first book in this series, I was very excited to pick up where I had left off. The story starts out fine with discovering more about the relationship between Darcy, Georgianna, and Fitzwilliam (hence the two stars). But when Darcy goes to the manor??? It really adds nothing to the original story and leaves the reader bemused. Had I to do over again, I would skip the second book and head straight to the third.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading the first installment of Aidan's Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman trilogy, and enjoyed it enough to purchase the second and third novel in one visit to the bookstore. 'An Assembly Such as This' felt a faithful tribute to one of Austen's most beloved gentleman, and I was even so impressed with the masculine perspective on the Darcy-Elizabeth relationship that she weaves that I thought we would see clearly how Darcy could have really believed Elizabeth might accept that first marriage proposal. I just finished 'Duty and Desire' and must say I am pretty thoroughly disappointed. The first half of the novel is well enough, and introduces the Georgiana-Darcy relationship in a convincing manner... THEN Darcy goes AWOL, and leaves the world of Austen behind for a more Gothic existence in which he battles Irish witchcraft, love charms, and makes a dash through the ruined foundations of an ancient castle with his Indiana Jones-worth side-kick of a valet, Fletcher, to save an infant from pagan human sacrifice... seriously.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though this isn't a sequel, Aidan certainly gives us a different perspective on who Darcy is in Austen's novel. In the sequels I have read, I can't say I agree with the Darcy they write out. And besides I have always wanted to know who the true Darcy is. How did he truly take Lizzy's refusal of marriage? Was he truly in love with her from the beginning? How did he view his Aunt Catherine and her interference in his personal life? How did he try and change himself? What friends would he have other than Bingley? There are so many unanswered questions Austen leaves out by writing Pride and Prejudice from Elizabeth's view. And I think Aidan does an excellent job of tackling those questions, and vague narratives. To see Darcy as a lovesick gentleman is hard to imagine, but I think it's truly who he is; he's a gentleman fighting between love and duty. Great writing. I highly recommend the whole trilogy to any JA fan out there.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I actually liked this book! I thought it was interesting and fun to read. I didn't read it as quickly or enthusiastically as 'An Assembly Such as This' but I still enjoyed it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read this book many times since being self-published by the author and maybe because of it, I am a bit biased and reacting subjectively toward more negative or lukewarm reviews of this book. While I do have to admit it is not my favorite of the three, there are many excellent passages and parts I could not be without. Others say this book is just a 'filler'. At that, I cringe. The author wrote this from Darcy's perspective and one knows Elizabeth can't be in every scene. The time she is not around, especially during this time, is actually a very important part of the story of why and how Darcy changed. Indeed, this book is not just stuffing, it's the stuff that Austen fans worldwide want to know about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I know that it's not reasonable to expect Darcy to spend all his time pining for Elizabeth Benett, but I don't see him taking on this particular adventure. It's more Sherlock Holmes than Fitzwilliam Darcy.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Fitzwilliam Darcy hides in London to be away from his obsession, Elizabeth Bennet. Still out of sight does not mean out of mind as he constantly thinks of her even as he decides he must find a lady suited to his lofty station. He spends the Yuletide holiday with his younger sister Georgiana who seems to be finally overcoming her long bout of melancholy caused by her poor relationship with Wickham. Darcy also feels good that Bingley has ended his courtship of Elizabeth¿s sister Jane though he thinks that his friend loves the girl and he ponders why there is something about these Bennet women.-------------- In his quest to find a wife equal to him, Darcy attends a country-house party hosted by his Cambridge classmate Lord Sayre. However, he finds rusticating with the Ton depressing as the males behave poorly and the women conspire to find either husbands or if not, married lovers. His host¿s half-sister turns Darcy on as he finds himself attracted to her, but Lady Sylvanie has her own woes and dark secrets.--------------- The second ¿Pride and Prejudice¿ offshoot, DUTY AND DESIRE is more Pamela Aidan¿s tale than the first book (see AN ASSEMBLY SUCH AS THIS) as the author takes Darcy on new adventures in his quest to get over his infatuation. Elizabeth for the most part never appears except in Darcy¿s mind. The story line brings to life the Regency era with its pompous caste system so that fans of the period will appreciate the country party at Norwycke Castle and Georgiana¿s turn to charity to lift her broken heart out of melancholia. Well written and fun to follow, however like many readers, this reviewer knows Jane Austen, Ms. Aidan is good, but she¿s not Jane Austen.------------- Harriet Klausner
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loved
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Reid20 More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this story much more than I thought. I had heard from others who read this book before me that the story does not have Elizabeth in it. Of course, She is frequently on Darcy's mind, but this story takes place during the period of separation for Darcy and her. Nonetheless, the story is delightful with interesting characters. I particularly like Darcy's valet, Fletcher, and his friend, Dy. They add some great insight into Darcy's character and humorous lines. Darcy's sister is a wonderful character and I enjoyed witnessing the deep care they hold for one another. I am very much looking forward to finishing this series. I think I liked this book better than the first in the series. I did not like Darcy much in the first book, but I came to understand him more in this book.
MistiLynn Lokken More than 1 year ago
In all of my imaginations of Darcy's activities during his quiet period from Pride and Prejudice, this storyline never entered my thoughts. It was a creative idea and a good nod to Austen's affinity to the macabre shown in Northanger Abbey.
JanetS9 More than 1 year ago
I love Pride & Prejudice and enjoyed the first book of this trilogy. This one goes a little off track with the wierd plot toward the end, and is quite dull in the first half as well. Not as good as I'd hoped.
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