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Ecological Intelligence: How Knowing the Hidden Impacts of What We Buy Can Change Everything
     

Ecological Intelligence: How Knowing the Hidden Impacts of What We Buy Can Change Everything

4.1 9
by Daniel Goleman
 

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The bestselling author of Emotional Intelligence and Primal Leadership now brings us Ecological Intelligence—revealing the hidden environmental consequences of what we make and buy, and how with that knowledge we can drive the essential changes we all must make to save our planet and ourselves.

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Ecological Intelligence: How Knowing the Hidden Impacts of What We Buy Can Change Everything 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
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Zoe_Abbott More than 1 year ago
I'm a fan of the author and have read all his books since his days as a science reporter for The New York Times. This book can be summed up in a single statement: Radical transparency about a product's origin, manufacture and distribution is the key to green consumerism. Today's shoppers are bombarded by "greenwashing," he says. The decision to buy a certain product--an organic apple, for example--is often based on a single eco-friendly aspect and ignorant of the other factors associated with the apple's growing, harvesting, packaging and shipping. Because every link in the supply chain affects every other, Goleman notes, only true transparency about a product's journey to the shelf can lead consumers to change their shopping habits in ways that will have positive effects on the environment, their health and global business practices. Recent polls have shown that people are willing to pay a premium for merchandise they know is free of toxic chemicals or wasn't manufactured using child labor. Armed with this information, shoppers will be able to choose the items that are most eco-friendly and thus help dictate how companies run their businesses. As an example of such a consumer-driven change, the author offers the recent nationwide removal of trans fats from foods, prompted by customer demand. Such ongoing shifts in shopping habits could force corporations across the world to re-evaluate the debate that "pits doing good against doing well," which has historically driven executives to choose their bottom line over ecological responsibility. This book is far more theoretical than Goleman's previous books. While I enjoy the writing I miss the "self" learning that he provided in books like Emotional Intelligence. It's been a decade since that was first published, and if you, like me, cherish books that make you a better person, there is a new book that I strongly recommend because it's just grand: Emotional Intelligence 2.0