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Einstein's Telescope: The Hunt for Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe
     

Einstein's Telescope: The Hunt for Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe

3.8 6
by Evalyn Gates
 

In 1936, Albert Einstein predicted that gravitational distortions would allow space itself to act as a telescope far more powerful than humans could ever build. Now, cosmologists at the forefront of their field are using this radical technique (“Einsteins's Telescope”) to detect the invisible. In fresh, engaging prose, astrophysicist Evalyn Gates

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Einstein's Telescope: The Hunt for Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Blubmin More than 1 year ago
Found beneath the cover of Einstein's Telescope is a book that manages to explain the complex theories behind gravitational lensing in a way that appeals to the layman without dumbing anything down. Assuredly it will appeal to any lover of the cosmic and easily captivates a curiosity of it. Regardless of knowledge of the subject of relativity, author Gates provides an ample exploration into the history of the theories upon which this book is based. It is upon this foundation that the rest of the book (especially the latter chapters) rest upon. 40 illustrations and diagrams dot the pages of the book and are effective tools in understanding many of the basic theories that Gates brings up. Through the course of the book, Gates manages to paint a modern comprehension of what the Universe is made of and where it is going. Gates (Ph.D. in Theoretical Particle Physics) remarks on the works of modern and past scientists and their efforts to explain why the universe is expanding and what that means to our current theories. Many questions are brought up and many are left unanswered. From this we're given a sense that perhaps the more we delve into the mechanics of the universe, the less we will truly know - a fact that is just about as frightening as it is intriguing. One thing is certain, however, that the impact of Einstein on the scientific community will most definitely continue through the use of gravitational lensing (Einstein's Telescope). Overall, this book is a beautiful introduction to something seemingly unreachable by any non-scientist. It flows in a very chronological manner which makes following only that much easier. From 1917 to the 2000's we see a progression in human comprehension that is bound to enthrall all the curious, science-loving people out there.
bareshiyth More than 1 year ago
Great writing, good basic science, and the best skinny on a really useful development in cosmological and astronomical science one could ask for!
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