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Extreme Unction: A Lupa Schwartz Mystery
     

Extreme Unction: A Lupa Schwartz Mystery

3.2 4
by J. David Core
 

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When an autopsy finds traces of the banned insecticide Chlordane in the anointing oil on the corpse of a local big-wig, Pittsburgh police bring Lupa Schwartz, an outspoken non-believer, into an investigation focused on a well-liked local clergyman. Worried that the police are planning to use him as a political fall-guy, Schwartz coerces Cattleya Hoskin, a magazine

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Extreme Unction: A Lupa Schwartz Mystery 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of twists and turns. Very enjoyable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This dragged on too long with details of his life and he is no nero wolf the reporter is uninteresting and what happened to the mystery of the grandfather plotting all over the place had great possibilities but went into too many directions mom
Zalen_Redlaw More than 1 year ago
unc·tion [uhngk-shuhn] noun. An act of anointing, especially as a medical treatment or religious rite. ex·treme [ik-streem] noun. An extreme act, measure, condition, etc Either one of these are nothing terribly interesting alone. Throw them together and you get one crazy story. Father Coneely is relatively new to his parish but is not favored by many of the elder clergy due to his controversial view on mercy killings and assisted suicide for folks in the last stages of life who are in severe pain and desire to end it all. When a conversation with a grieving family over the looming death of their father goes awry, the pastor is ultimately accused of murder when the man is found dead hours after Coneely performed extreme unction on the dying man. Enter Cat Hoskin and Lupa Schwartz. The latter is an eccentric old investigator with a garage full of classic cars, enough to give even Leno a run for his money. The former is a magazine journalist sent from Cleveland to Pittsburgh to write an article on the man. She soon finds herself knee-deep in the investigation Schwartz has taken on for the city, which would like him to prove Father Coneely was indeed the culprit. Follow Cat as she herself follows Schwartz in the hopes of gaining the story of a lifetime. As Schwartz has his own reasons for taking on the murder case, she also has her own additional reasons for taking on this endeavor, reasons that lie just beyond the story. As she digs for more information on this investigator and his ties to her, she finds herself as deep in the mystery as the man himself. On the surface it appears to be nothing more than a greedy family hiding an attempt of insurance fraud, but is that all there is to it, or is that even the case? A killer is in house. Can you decipher who did it before the big reveal at the end? Was it Father Coneely or someone else who poisoned the holy oil used during the last rites, someone whose ideas are more sinister than assisted suicide? I figured it out, but I won't ruin it for you. Extreme Unction is a wild romp following Hoskin and Schwartz, and it includes a colorful cast of characters, which include many classic--some exotic-- cars. The only thing I found the story lacking was colorful foldouts of the cars. I found myself looking up the various cars mentioned as I read just so I could keep up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
since the author didn't deign to give us a description i had to goggle it. and copied and pasted what i found. here you go: "When an autopsy finds traces of the banned insecticide Chlordane in the anointing oil on the corpse of a local big-wig, Pittsburgh police bring Lupa Schwartz, an outspoken non-believer, into an investigation focused on a well-liked local clergyman. Worried that the police are planning to use him as a political fall-guy, Schwartz coerces Cattleya Hoskin, a magazine reporter with a connection to his family’s past, to chronicle his process and squelch any misgiving that his world-view influenced the outcome. Suspicion in the case is focused on Fr. Coneely, an outspoken euthanasia advocate who had earlier made the mistake of telling the family of the now-dead man that, hypothetically, he could safely apply poison-laden oil to their suffering father during last rites, and nobody need be the wiser. Was Mr. Hanson the willing victim of a mercy killing, or was a lapsing insurance policy the real motive for one of Hanson’s five children to taint the oil?" 1 star because i had to look the description up and it sounds like boring drivel.