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Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates
     

Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates

4.7 63
by Tom Robbins
 

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Switters is a contradiction for all seasons: an anarchist who works for the government; a pacifist who carries a gun; a vegetarian who sops up ham gravy; a cyberwhiz who hates computers; a man who, though obsessed with the preservation of innocence, is aching to deflower his high-school-age stepsister (only to become equally enamored of a nun ten years his

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Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 64 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the first Robbins novel I'd read since Jitterbug Perfume in 1985. I loved each of his first four novels, and JP seemed a kind of summary or clarification of the ideas presented in those first four, leading me to conclude that Robbins had said all he had to say. I still think that to a degree, yet Fierce Invalids offers something fresh in that it takes those same ideas, that same mystical/spiritual approach to the puzzle of human existence, and applies them to a world that has totally changed since JP and its predecessors. Although published 16 years after Jitterbug in 2000, Fierce Invalids takes place in the world we still inhabit in 2013 rather than the 60s-70s world of the first four novels. Seeing how Robbins' concerns play out in today's world was the most interesting aspect of this novel for me. It certainly seems more difficult today to see things from that spiritual/look-for-the-reality-behind-reality point of view. As a result, I would agree with a previous reviewer who says the writing style seems forced at points, and the polemical passages too often seem like set speeches instead of dialogue that arises naturally from the story. Despite these shortcomings. however, Fierce Invalids left me feeling like I'd reconnected with a part of myself I'd almost lost over the past 30 years, and I think the world in general is in that same state. There is a wisdom here that the 21st century needs, and if the execution seems rough in places it's only because Robbins is exploring how what the questers of the early novels learned can be applied in order to salvage something -- our humanity, perhaps? -- from the mess we have now. The light-dark dualism of Fierce Invalids is perfectly reflective of those today seeking to find common ground between what's called Right and Left to form a more sane world. I'm thinking of people like Julian Assange, Ron Paul, Dennis Kucinich, Edward Snowden, maybe even Pope Francis. Finally, besides being relevant and hilarious, I doubt anyone will ever come up with a better definition of ADHD than Robbins' "extrapolatory zigzag."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is intoxicating, addicting, hilarious, thought provoking, and honest. I only wish that there was an entire series following Switters as I want to never stop reading this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Switters is a credit to his employers, his readers and his grandmother. Tom why can`t you be more prolific? One of those writers who churns out 100 books before retirement - or at least dies trying. My only consolation for your meagre (in numerical terms) output is at the fact that this one is perfect. I`ll settle for that.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jitterbug may be TR's best book. But, no doubt, Switters his finest creation. Indiana Jones meets McMurphy from Cuckoo's Nest! As far as bad Bobby Case goes...no precedent exists. The ending may let down but the episode in the South American jungle - featuring the pomey anthropologist, the pyramid headed soothsayer and Switters in a hammock - perhaps the funniest ever put to paper. Don't buy this book if you are bent on discovering the Colonel's secret recipe. Otherwise...
Guest More than 1 year ago
The novel is about Switters, an anarchist CIA operative who is caught up in a superstitious medley of confusion when he ventures deep into the jungle of South America to free his grandmother's easy-going parrot. The adventure continues to three other continents, following Switters as he finds trouble in every form imaginable. Robbins has outdone himself again, proving the best novels are those with endless supplies of political and religious maxims. Not since Fight Club has humor and philosophy combined to produce such a bold work of literature. Robbins is an intelligent scoundrel who crafts each sentence to fit his beautiful creation: Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this is probably the best book for anyone who loves the contradictive nature of mankind and the usless knowledge possesed by all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a HUGE Tom Robbins fan...this HAS to be the best I've read so far. My very open-minded 82 year old father borrowed this book...and LOVED IT!
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