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The Final Call: Hockey Stories from a Legend in Stripes
     

The Final Call: Hockey Stories from a Legend in Stripes

4.6 10
by Kerry Fraser, Wayne Gretzky (Foreword by)
 

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After almost two thousand games and thirty years of wearing the Stripes, legendary NHL official Fraser dropped his final puck at the end of the 2009/2010 season and relives his colourful career officiating hockey in his candid book.

After thirty years in the NHL, legendary referee Kerry Fraser has decided to hang up his skates and enjoy the game from the other side

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The Final Call: Hockey Stories from a Legend in Stripes 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you like hockey than you must refer to this book. I TOTALLY DIFER FROM THE " DONT BOTHER REVIEW" BECAUSE THIS PERSON I S OBVIOUSLY NOT A HOCKEY PLAYER.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Perfect book to read if ur sport is hockey
gcs More than 1 year ago
I totally differ with the other reviews posted. I couldn't get through the first chapter - it was all about Kerry, Kerry, Kerry. So I figure I'll just read the chapter about the Red Wings, as I'm a fan and live in the area. Big mistake. Kerry must have been at the NBA Championship in Chicago when he wrote this - "we drove past burning cars and looters." This did happen after the Bulls won in 1997, but NOT in Detroit. I spoke with several people who were at Game 4. We are in agreement - there was only public urination, no looting, no burning. Even USA Today stated the celebration was peaceful. The only reason I gave it one star - it's required. Put a big minus in front of my star.
yakfishnick More than 1 year ago
A great perspective from the other side of the hockey story. Great stories from the game woven together with Kerry's experience. Finished it in two days. Thanks Mr. Fraser for sharing your experience!
eyevet More than 1 year ago
I have been waiting eagerly for this book since I knew of its publication, and after an easy couple of days read, I found that the wait was worthwhile. I believe any hockey fan will enjoy the insights and wonderful stories about hockey's famous and not so famous, as well as what it is really like to officiate the fast paced, hard hitting game of professional ice hockey. If you love the game, this insightful and intertaining memoir is a must. if you're not a fan, it is still a must read that will provide a window into the life of one of the most enduring and revered referees in the history of the NHL. This book will bring not only a smile to your face, but also may bring a tear to your eye. When I finished reading the compelling recollections of Kerry Fraser, I found myself wanting more. Thanks Kerry for putting the same heart and soul you gave to professional hockey, all those years, into this book.
Frank1 More than 1 year ago
Kerry Fraser provides readers with an inside look at Hockey. Readers are given a rare look at the human side of being an NHL Official. In this book, Kerry opened his heart for all to see. Readers will experience the emotions and presures that he experienced. This is one book that you will not be able to put down. If you always wanted to know what it feels like to be an NHL Referee, this is the book. If you always wanted what is said on the ice, this is the book. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys hockey. This may be Kerry Fraser's "The Final Call", but I hope it is not his final book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ice_Ref_413 More than 1 year ago
I found it very interesting that this was not just another retired sports figure that wanted to "blow their own horn". Kerry Fraser takes you into the action from the other side of the game...that of the official. His love of the game is secondary to his love of God and his family, which he shows us many times. It is interesting how Fraser takes us on a trip down memory lane to some of the greatest hockey venues in the NHL, while allowing us to get understand a side of the sport that many have never seen. His memories of the past are packaged into his final games at each of the cities, giving us a better understanding of what the officials see and go through in their lonley profession. The one memory that was most moving was his vivid description of his meeting with his boss, John McCauley, where he was made aware of what he needed to do to be the best official in the NHL. Fraser learned a lesson that many officials, in all sports, need to learn...and that is that the officials are not bigger than the game. The results of his change resulted in his being one of the most respected officials in the NHL by the players, coaches and management, as well as some of its biggest stars. His way of being able to gain the respect of the players is something that is a lost art in sports today. His confrontations with Gretzky, Lemieux and others that turned into life lessons for the players, as well as Fraser, keep the reader wanting for more. In addition to all of this, Fraser shows the fun side of officiating with his stories about the players and other officials...my favorite is the one with the Montreal Canadians in his first year in the NHL. "The Final Call" should be required reading for anyone who wants to be an official, before they do their first game. If you are currently an official, then read it before your next game. I am very confident that it will help you be a better official as well as a better person.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This honest look at hockey from the other side of the plexiglass is an extremely honest and insightful read. Fraser does an impressive job of bringing games long past back to life and setting the reader in the thick of the action. He's also quick to admit to mistakes, misgivings, and his very human fallibility, which I deeply appreciate as a reader. This is the story of an ending, the closing of a 30 year career, and a man's struggle to find a new beginning - a new definition of himself. Anyone who's ever completed a long life journey will be able to relate to Fraser's tale. An added plus? The Final Call is also hilarious in many parts.