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Fix
     

Fix

3.8 26
by Leslie Margolis
 

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It hurts to be beautiful.

Pretty, blond, popular Cameron Beekman has it all — lots of girlfriends, a hot boyfriend, and a successful family. She's perfection. Gone are her days as the outcast, huge-nosed "Beakface." Which, as it turns out, was nothing a good nose job couldn't fix.

While her little sister, Allie, struggles with doubts about her own

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Fix 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
DanceBree17 More than 1 year ago
This is a great book dealing with the rise of teenagers going under the knife to have plastic surgery done at such young ages. Cameron is really just a lot like many teenagers who are very affected by looks and how we are perceived. What I like is that even after she has her breasts augmented, she still does not feel the way she imagined in her mind she would be post surgery. Her younger sister Allie is the girl I liked the most. She is very sporty and very driven to be a great soccer player and do something with her life. She's the polar opposite of Cameron and even though she goes into the same doctors office, she has a lot more going on and does not feel the change is what she needs. Allie proves to girls out there that even though the idea of change might be strong...deep down you have to believe in yourself and you can not let the flaw affect you, but transform you internally.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was rather boring. It had a good storyline and a good underlying message, but there wasn't enough meat in it to make a mark. I think the one thing that I liked about it was that it covered a topic I've never read about before. Plastic surgery is pretty controversial and I appreciated how the author didn't take a certain side on it. She showed how Cameron was happy with the perks surgery gave her and how her sister wasn't. I was expecting there to be a prominent pro or con attitude, but there wasn't. The book illustrated both sides of the argument and in the end let you choose for yourself where you stand. I also liked how Cameron and Allie grew throughout the story Cameron through her photography, and Allie through discovering who she wanted to be. It's nice to see characters that change and evolve. Even with all those good aspects, though, I wasn't satisfied. There were no enormous twists you were able to predict almost everything that happened, and there wasn't anything there that would make me want to keep reading besides to say that I finished the book. The pages didn't turn by themselves, and there was no true insentive to keep reading. Fix is a good book to read if you're looking for fresh subject material but not if your looking for something that's going to impact you. Although, given the topic, it could be that kind of book, it's not. Which is slightly disappointing to me. There was so much potential from working with new subject matter, and this book just didn't pull it off. Read it for something new and interesting, though. Maybe we can look forward to better books on the same topic later on.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Cameron and Allie are sisters. They used to look like it, too. Since Cameron turned fifteen, though, things have changed. Cameron and Allie inherited big noses from their father, but other than that, they both have the good looks of their mother, formerly a rather famous model. When Cameron turned fifteen, her life changed completely. For the better, she says.

How? She got a nose job. She turned from homely to gorgeous, moved to a new school, and now she's so much more popular and happy than before! Plastic surgery, Cameron feels, is a brilliant idea. It can fix everything, right?

Now she is turning fifteen, and Allie's mother feels that she needs the same birthday present Cameron got: a nose job. It made Cameron a much happier person, and who wouldn't want that for their other daughter? Problem is, nobody asked Allie. Allie is already confident and happy, the way Cameron keeps saying plastic surgery made her. There's one thing she's not that Cameron is, though: gorgeous. But really, does Allie need to be gorgeous? Or is that just what her family has led her to believe?

Leslie Margolis's novel FIX is, aside from being an interesting story about a family, particularly two sisters, a great look at a rather controversial issue: plastic surgery, particularly for teenagers. It shows all sides of the issue, from the perspective of two teenage girls (who, admittedly, could be slightly more realistic characters at times). It is a riveting story, and Allie's and Cameron's very different motivations for making the decisions that they do are quite believable. FIX is certainly worth reading, particularly for anyone who is considering plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Cameron and Allie are sisters. They used to look like it, too. Since Cameron turned fifteen, though, things have changed. Cameron and Allie inherited big noses from their father, but other than that, they both have the good looks of their mother, formerly a rather famous model. When Cameron turned fifteen, her life changed completely. For the better, she says. How? She got a nose job. She turned from homely to gorgeous, moved to a new school, and now she's so much more popular and happy than before! Plastic surgery, Cameron feels, is a brilliant idea. It can fix everything, right? Now she is turning fifteen, and Allie's mother feels that she needs the same birthday present Cameron got: a nose job. It made Cameron a much happier person, and who wouldn't want that for their other daughter? Problem is, nobody asked Allie. Allie is already confident and happy, the way Cameron keeps saying plastic surgery made her. There's one thing she's not that Cameron is, though: gorgeous. But really, does Allie need to be gorgeous? Or is that just what her family has led her to believe? Leslie Margolis's novel FIX is, aside from being an interesting story about a family, particularly two sisters, a great look at a rather controversial issue: plastic surgery, particularly for teenagers. It shows all sides of the issue, from the perspective of two teenage girls (who, admittedly, could be slightly more realistic characters at times). It is a riveting story, and Allie's and Cameron's very different motivations for making the decisions that they do are quite believable. FIX is certainly worth reading, particularly for anyone who is considering plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons. **Reviewed by: Jocelyn Pearce
Guest More than 1 year ago
this was definetly one of my favorite books. but i was very disappointed by the ending b/c the author left so many questions unanswered.. how is the moms career now? are eve and allie still close? does allie regret anything? how is cam doing w/ the new school and the new body and the photography? how is the father dealing? yknow i wish the end would have been more better but all in all it was a really good book..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
From the rewiews it seems like a good read. I would suggest reading it because lots of people liked it. I hope to read it soon. Have a good read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thx:*).... anyways jaysdens n @$$.he gunna break up with me again for some other girl but wteva he duz this all the time. Used to it-_-
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
W T F???
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book gives an impottant life lesson that every girl should learn which is love yoursefl the way you are and your perfect the way you are. That's exctly what lead character Allie realizes. She doesnt have to be like everybody else you should just love yourself the way you are!!! On the other hand is sister of Allie: Cameren who is caught up in th ever changing world of Hollywood. Over a long time of working on her portfolio it gets regected. Camrren get another plasic surgery because she wants perfection but realizes that real people can never be perfection. So she puts together a portfolio about real people not barbie dolls. I only wish it was longer! That's the reason why I gave it 4 out of 5 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Fix by Leslie Margolis is one of those books every girl should read. Furthermore, it should be required reading for anyone who even thinks about visiting a plastic surgeon. Fix follows the Beekman sisters, Cameron and Allie who are the alternate protagonists of the novel. When the book begins, Cameron has already had a nose job and is enjoying a better life thanks to the surgery and a school transfer. No more mean nicknames, no more bullies, no more feeling like an outcast. Getting ready to go to college, Cameron begins to wonder if she "needs" more cosmetic surgery in order to fit in on campus at UC "Santa Barbie." Meanwhile, Allie is getting ready for her own nose job and has to decide if being "pretty" is worth such drastic measures. No matter where you stand on the subject, the book will probably feature something you can agree with. Margolis really looks at the plastic surgery issue from all sides. The book is interesting but also informative. By the end of the novel, it's clear that there is no right answer about getting (or not getting) cosmetic surgery. But Margolis intelligently examines all sides of the issue highlighting the risks and the motivations that can lead a girl to the operating table. The writing style is clear. Margolis presents a lot of information about the risks of surgery without getting excessively gory or boring. Ally and Cameron look at the surgery issue very differently and Margolis does a good job of showing that. This fact is what elevates the book from a commentary on cosmetic surgery to a character study of how a girl can define and shape her own sense of beauty. The Beekman sisters are great protagonists for this novel. Even if they sometimes come off a bit flat. At times the characters seem more like archetypes than real people but that might be inherent to the nature of the book--since it is so clearly trying to start a conversation about this important issue. Secondary characters, in particular, often seem to lack dimension--appearing merely to make some important point: At times it seems like the characters are preaching their respective messages/opinions rather than taking part in a plot. Nonetheless, Fix is a quick, enjoyable and above all interesting read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hope tje world doesnt end up like this. Good read tho.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was alright i agree with the other reviews...it was a little boring but it did have a good message and i red it pretty fast
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was ok. It was not the best book. I didn't understand the meaning. It hooked me, but at the end i asked myself:'Why did I read this?' It was one of the worst book i have ever read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a great book that raises alot of good questions about soceity and what beauty means. The author definately did her research on her subject, bringing in alot of medical background. This is a quick read and is very absorbing. However, it seems at the end that the author wasn't sure what message to send, especially with Cameron. It seems as if she's trying to say that Cameron has come to an understanding of it all when she finally makes her photo portfolio, but the book never decisevly goes in that direction. Excellent though.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Happy birthday tessa
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tell me someone should i get this book