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Fly on the Wall: How One Girl Saw Everything
     

Fly on the Wall: How One Girl Saw Everything

4.1 49
by E. Lockhart
 

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"I think this might be the best YA novel . . . I've ever read." John Green

From E. Lockhart, author of We Were Liars—the New York Times bestselling phenomenon—and the uproarious and heartwarming Ruby Oliver books, comes a fast-paced and hysterically funny novel that answers the question:

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Fly on the Wall: How One Girl Saw Everything 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gretchen is a very relatable character that readers will fall in love with. E. Lockhart did an amazing job. This was my first book I read by her and it was well writen. I would say that is actually 4.5 stars and for readers Grade 8 and up. Overall, it was a great read.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
For Gretchen Yee life as an artificial redhead is anything but glamorous. A student at the Manhattan High School for the Arts (New Yorkers think: La Guardia) with girls wearing unitards or saris and cliques like the Art Rats, Gretchen feels too ordinary to belong. She stands out not because she's special or unique but because she's ordinary save for her stop-sign-red hair. Gretchen is also lonely and confused. Her best friend is more and more distant and the boys at her school-like her crush the fantastically amazing and artistic and offbeat Titus? Well, they don't make any sense either. Then Gretchen makes an idle wish to spend one week as a fly on the wall of the boy's locker room not expecting much to change.* But sometimes, wishes don't like to stay idle. Sometimes they like to come true. Life as a vermin isn't much more glamorous than life as an artificial redhead. But it's certainly more informative. Gretchen gets to observe the boys as they come and go for each gym class. Lower classmen, acquaintances, friends, and even her crush, are all available to scrutinize. Instead of just learning, as she had expected, about what the boys really look like under those baggy jeans and t-shirts and what they really think and say behind closed doors-Gretchen also gets a chance to find out how she fits into the school. When the week is over Gretchen might have even learned enough to live life not as an artificial redhead or a vermin but as a superhero. I like Gretchen a lot as a character. She is also a comic book fan which almost always makes a character fun to read about. Excuse the pun, but after being a fly, Gretchen's metamorphosis from insecure to empowered girl really starts. At times Lockhart's language seemed a little . . . unique. (You can tell me what you think after reading her segment on "gherkins.") I don't know if it's that she's using slang that I find weird and this is therefore only my problem, but it just made me hyper-aware that I was reading a book at certain points in the story. As for the plot, it's a classic problem-resolution kind of story. Which I like. If you need to pick up something light and fun after a sad book I'd recommend this. Finally, even though you think the book is about a girl turning into a fly which is a fair assumption, it's really about more than that too. Specifically, it's about a girl learning to go after what she wants. *Basically, Fly on the Wall takes Franz Kafka's plot from The Metamorphosis and brings it into the modern world and into a book that would appeal to teenage girls. And, for that reason, I almost didn't read it. I hated reading The Metamorphosis in high school and, to be honest, I still strongly dislike the book and avoid Kafka at all costs because of it. BUT, I am happy to say that the similarity to Kafka's novel begins and ends with Gretchen turning into a fly. Possible Pairings: Girl Overboard by Justina Chen Headley, The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl by Barry Lyga, The Superhero Handbook by Michael Powell, Vibes by Amy Kathleen Ryan, The Fly (movie)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
yeah, wow. e. lockhart, i already know, is an awesome author. this was the only published book by her i haven't yet read. i REALLY liked it. the length surprised me (roughly 200 pages although you can easily find that out yourself) but despite it being quick, you still really get involved with the characters. gretchen is relateable, witty and artsy--my kind of girl! i'd recommend this to anyone, especially a girl, who isn't intimidated by too cool people. ;) because i kinda wish i were gretchen sometimes, especially at the end where she realized that her life really isn't so bad. i liked it a lot!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would highly recommend this book to a friend that is in middle or high school or for kids that have parents going through relationship problems..What made me like was it had alot of,emotion,vocabulary that you wouldnt see in a regular book I mostly liked the detail in the book. I liked this author so much I think I might read another book by her called the boyfriend list,I herd I got good reviews,and five stars. Theirs nothing i didn't liked about this book, i liked this book from beginning till end.I`m really glad i chose this book for my summer reading project.
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