×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food
     

Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food

3.9 23
by Paul Greenberg
 

See All Formats & Editions

"A necessary book for anyone truly interested in what we take from the sea to eat, and how, and why." -Sam Sifton, The New York Times Book Review.

Writer and life-long fisherman Paul Greenberg takes us on a journey, examining the four fish that dominate our menus: salmon, sea bass, cod, and tuna. Investigating the forces that get fish to our

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Four Fish 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
B-2 More than 1 year ago
This book is centered about the complicated interaction between man and fish in general, and several common (actually, more than four)fish species in particular. It is remarkable for several reasons. First, it presents in a very simple and interesting way an enormous amount of curious facts we should know ( but have no idea) about creatures on our plates and the ways they get there. Second, it is unique as an environmental work because it really makes you understand: human interaction with any edible, or useful creature on the planet has and will involve three aspects: hunt/gather, preserve, domesticate/herd. Most of environmental books focus on preservation, period - and you'll see why it makes them limited. Third, in addition to its main heros - salmon, tuna, cod, seabass etc - the pages of the book are populated by many colorful and interesting human specimens: an Alaskan native, a Greek businessman, an Israeli reproduction scientist, a Norse ichtiologist, and of course fishermen of all kinds, author included. The language of the book is simple, entertaining, and witty. No biology degree is required. I rate books as "Buy and Keep" (B&K), "Read a Library Copy" ( RLC) and "Once-I-Put-It-Down-I-Couldn't-Pick-It-Up" ("OIPD-ICPU ). I give this one B&K.
will2010 More than 1 year ago
I purchased Four Fish and found it to be a very Comprehensive and Professional Book. I also recommend the Book "Letusgo-fishing.com" by: Lonnie L. Williams, both books will help Anglers catch the Big One! I think both Novice and Experienced Fishermen will learn expert tips about the future of fishing.
LisaDunckley 18 days ago
Four Fish makes fish INTERESTING—and I don't even eat fish! The four fish that are investigated are the Tuna, the Salmon, the Bass, and the Cod—the four fish that dominate the menus at fancy restaurants and fast food chains and family dinner tables. The underlying premise is that globally we are overfishing. We are harvesting more fish every year than are produced. In some cases we have less than 10% of the fish that were there when commercial fishing started. This is obviously not sustainable. For each of the four fish, the book discusses what attempts are being made to solve the problem, and the pros and cons of each method. Some advanced genetic techniques are working to a degree (implants that release hormones so that fish will spawn yearlong and not just all at the same time once a year, and breeding fish that can gain weight at quadruple the rate of the original versions, etc). A lot of people have tried farming the fish, some species are more successful than others. Some of the fish are more sustainable than others, and Greenberg makes the case that we need to choose our “everyday” fish from the fish that are plentiful and easy to raise and which can turn a high percentage of their feed into pounds of meat, and to consider the other fish to be “special occasion” fish. For example, it can take over TWENTY pounds of feed for a bluefin tuna to produce one pound of meat. This is not a good trait for farmed fish, and it also makes tuna inappropriate as a main source of wild caught meals for us. Regular salmon takes up to six pounds of feed to produce a pound of flesh, while breeders have improved farmed salmon to the point where it takes as few as three pounds. This is obviously much better for the environment and the world of “fish as food”--and more sustainable. Yet, the amount of salmon consumed has doubled over the last 20 years, and we are not able to keep up with the demand. Sea bass also requires almost three pounds of feed for every pound of flesh. Another way to solve this problem would be to select the fish we eat based on how easy they are to farm, and how efficiently they turn feed into flesh—to enable us to have the 2.2 billion pounds of fish that is consumed annually without depleting the resources. Greenberg's book is compelling and concerning. Destined to become a classic like the iconic Cod!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago