×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Four Ms. Bradwells: A Novel
     

The Four Ms. Bradwells: A Novel

3.0 12
by Meg Waite Clayton
 

See All Formats & Editions

BONUS: This edition contains a The Four Ms. Bradwells discussion guide and excerpts from Meg Waite Clayton's The Wednesday Sisters, The Language of Light, and The Wednesday Daughters.

Mia, Laney, Betts, and Ginger have reunited to celebrate Betts’s appointment to the Supreme Court. But when Senate hearings uncover a deeply

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Four Ms. Bradwells 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tapestry100 More than 1 year ago
In Meg Waite Clayton's latest, we are again introduced to a group of friends, but instead of watching their friendship grow like we did in The Wednesday Sisters, we find ourselves in the midst of a friendship already decades in the making. Mia, Laney, Betts, and Ginger have been friends since their days in law school, when they were all dubbed "the Ms. Bradwells" by their professor in their very first class at the University of Michigan Law School. We first meet the Four Ms. Bradwells during Senate hearings to appoint Betts to the Supreme Court, except a skeleton in their closet is uncovered from early on in their friendship that may hinder Betts' appointment. This skeleton also raises questions about their friendship and who has kept secrets from who over the years. Clayton also raises other issues in her book, including those of women's rights, but I'll leave the main issue that she brings to her story a secret, because it is this issue that ties everything together in the book, and I don't want to give it away. Needless to say, the secret has to do with a death, and this is the crux of the skeleton in the friends' closet that they need to overcome. The secret is brought up in the very first chapter so you're not kept waiting, and it's presented in a completely intriguing and compelling manner, making you want to find out what happened. One of the aspects that I enjoyed most about The Wednesday Sisters that is carried over into The Four Ms. Bradwells is that I felt like I had gotten to know the friends by the end of the book, that they were my friends too. Clayton has a knack for making her characters completely believable and tangible, with all the quirks and imperfections that would make them real people. They have real faults, real problems, aren't perfect, and in this imperfection, she has created honest and true characters. Do yourself a favor and pick up The Four Ms. Bradwells. It's a refreshing read for early summer and while it does deal with some heavy subjects, it does so in a manner that is easy to read and relatable to the characters. And while you're at it, if you haven't read The Wednesday Sisters, pick that up at the same time. Both books are excellent stories on the power of friendship and what that power can help friends overcome. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TiBookChatter More than 1 year ago
Lainey, Mia, Betts and Ginger have been friends since their days at the University of Michigan. While studying law, their teacher aptly nicknames them "the Ms. Bradwells" after discussing a case where a woman was not allowed to be appointed to the Court. Several years later, many of them have families of their own yet they still remain the best of friends. Betts is about to be appointed to the Supreme Court and as she completes the interview portion of the appointment, a secret from the past threatens to surface. The four women decide to spend the weekend at Ginger's family home on Chesapeake Bay to discuss their options and to avoid the media. There are many things that I enjoyed about this book. The story centers around four, very strong women. I found this refreshing. Usually when reading a book like this, I get frustrated with the women because they are too timid or weak. I never felt this way while reading this one. I also enjoyed the setting quite a bit. A beach house on Chesapeake Bay is pretty perfect no matter how you cut it and Ms. Clayton does a wonderful job describing the house and its immediate surroundings. I also enjoyed the closeness of these women. Sometimes the interactions between women can seem forced, but I did not get that here. There was the closeness I mentioned, but also a realistic tension to the characters that made them seem real. However, I did have some issues with the book. This is where the setting sort of worked against the story. Once they got to the house, the only things really discussed were things that happened on the Bay. Through flashbacks we're given the rest of the story but as a reader, in order for me to really understand how these women think, I needed to know more about their lives prior to becoming "The Bradwells" and unfortunately, there wasn't much said about their lives prior to college. As for the secret, it was sort of anti-climactic and a bit predictable. Since I don't classify this as a mystery, I didn't expect there to be a big reveal or anything, but it seemed rather abrupt in the telling. Overall, the book read like a play to me. It was pretty much confined to the one setting and although I loved the setting, I think it stole the show a bit.
ethel55 More than 1 year ago
I found the premise of this novel to be interesting. I usually enjoy books about women looking back on their past, interconnected lives. However, I didn't really relate to any one of these women individually and began to find their 30 year old mystery somewhat tiresome. That being said, I did like the story of how they became the Four Ms. Bradwells, I thought that was a very interesting bit of law lore. This may be better read in a book group situation where there are more people to connect with each main character.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can't say I enjoyed this book, would not recommend.
sierrarain00 More than 1 year ago
The Four Ms. Bradwells: A Novel by Meg Waite Clayton was an enjoyable read for me. The story is about four women who met in Law School that have been best of friends for 30+ years. The book is a little confusing, in that the author goes back and forth between the present and past. Each chapter is "told" by one of the four women, in first person. I kept having to flip back into the other chapters to find out whose point of view and whether it was past or present. I thought it was a good book, and it delved into these women confronting a past that had never been resolved. This was a good book, that I would recommend to my friends.