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Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker
     

Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker

4.2 99
by Kevin Mitnick, William L. Simon (With), Steve Wozniak (Foreword by)
 

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Kevin Mitnick was the most elusive computer break-in artist in history. He accessed computers and networks at the world's biggest companies—and however fast the authorities were, Mitnick was faster, sprinting through phone switches, computer systems, and cellular networks. He spent years skipping through cyberspace, always three steps ahead and labeled

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Ghost in the Wires 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 99 reviews.
TeresaHeinrich More than 1 year ago
Better than Grisham because it's true. For some of us Silicon Valley natives, Kevin Mitnick has been as captivating as Howard Hughes was for a previous generation. He was an iconoclastic rebel, whose victims were monolithic corporations like the phone company, attacked via their guileless front office people. Because the law didn't understand his crimes, the damages were inflated and his criminal sentence was wildly out of proportion to the actual harm done. However his arrest did stop what was an escalating trajectory of criminal behavior. So although what he was punished for was out of synch with the actual damages, had he gone unchecked the harm could eventually have matched the government's claims. But what I find interesting is the author's voice: the lack of remorse, the gleeful retelling of malicious tricks upon others. Read this side by side with Catch Me If You Can and you get a fantastic case study of antisocial personalities who manipulate others for the game, whose narcissism leads them to believe that others are stupid for having faith in them. Fascinating.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
1.) How much further could he have gotten if he had minimised the usage of the exploits he engineered (eg. not felt compelled to share the exploits so widely and not used them so frequently). 2.) Gotta wonder how he'd manage in this "post 9/11" era where freedoms and privacy are on a level that makes Stalin's Soviet Union look liberal. I fully understand Mitnik's drive - the joy of conquering the unconquerable, simply to show it can be done. Not for gain or for any malevolence...just to do it. I started on "trash 80s" (TRS-80) and BASIC...C64s. Running packet sniffers and Sun Telecom network traffic analysers - simply to learn. The joy isn't always the obvious; getting behind the locked door. It's the learning. The accumulation of knowledge of systems which are becoming so intricately intwined on such a global level. It's almost religious - like getting closer to God ("God" in this case being some master server of all the world's knowledge). As such, thata desire to learn everything is ccomparable to drug addiction - you always search for better information...chase the high. And qyou can never get enough. Good read tho. GLAD KEVIN IS FREE!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is exciting and enlightening! This is not just a book for nerds, but for anyone with an appetite for real-world adventure. Kevin explains unfamiliar terms and walks a fine line between too technical for the average reader, and too verbose for the knowledgeable reader; and he walks it well. Love this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Details, details. If you ever followed Mitnick, you'll appreciate all of the details in this book. I work in cybersecurity but I feel even non-IT people could get into this book. It has quite the "Catch Me If You Can" vibe going. I also recommend The Art of Deception and The Art of Intrusion.
mabu_X More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. A confident, yet humble account of the greatest hacker hunt in history. Some of the contents might seem too incredible to believe, but speaking as someone who was starting out in infosec in 1995, it sounds just about right compared to the stories and rumors I remember floating around at the time. It is great to get the whole story of what I heard only half of.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A funny entertaining read! A must get!!
Packer-Fangirl More than 1 year ago
This book follows Kevin Mitnick¿s life, from childhood to adulthood. The book explains how he got into hacking and just how far that took him. The book is a great read because its tone doesn¿t sound factual like a textbook, but rather like you¿re listening to him personally tell the story. He describes his life vividly. He talks not only about how easy and simple it was to hack into telephones and computers, but also how easy it was to trick people into giving him what he needed he calls this ¿social engineering.¿ He described the thrill of gaining new data and the ridiculous notions that some people truly believed. In the story he tells it like it is, the backstabbing friends, a person¿s fear of the unknown, rumors being accepted as truth, the law not always being just. It¿s hard to hate the character knowing that what he was doing was wrong, but he never once gained a profit from his hacking. Kevin had many opportunities to become a hardened criminal, an uncatchable thief making millions off of others hard work, but he only hacked for fun describing it like wining at the next level of a video game. When in jail he tries to explain to an inmate that he ¿didn¿t do it for the money;¿ he ¿did it for the entertainment¿ and that¿s what confused many law officials. In the book he shows no remorse for what he had done rather its sounds like he is boasting and bragging, but to me there is nothing wrong with that. People brag about anything that will get them attention, good or bad. I enjoyed this book because not only does it explain how he breaks in, but he breaks it down so that even though one may not be into technology they get the base of it. It also shows the faults that people have, and how vulnerable a person or a company can be.
Michael Worthington More than 1 year ago
The book is an entertaining read following Kevin from his initial childhood influences to his days of "hacking out of curiosity". It then follows him while he tries to hide from the law while using his skills to track those who are tracking him. It is filled with wonderful examples of "social engineering", using people's predisposition to trust/help others to get information, which is worth the read in itself. It was a surprising element as I was thinking his hacking skills would have been related more to technical skills. The skill to get strangers to easily give the information he lacked added a great human element to the book. The book has chronological flow and really only started to slow down around the 3/4 point where it felt more like a wrap up then a continuation of the "story telling" feel of the fist 3/4. Overall a very good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ghost in the Wires is an interesting memoir about the life of Kevin Mitnick, an internationally renowned hacker and social engineer who pushes the limits of the law. Beginning with simple sociological manipulation, Mitnick began forging bus punch cards and experimenting with radio mechanics in his early years. He then progressed his knowledge of manipulation and technology to the point of becoming an expert in the field of exploitation. This memoir follows Mitnick throughout his many escapades with the law and how he usually always found a way out; with the effect he has on his friends and loved ones detailed as well, as a critical element in his life. I would highly recommend Ghost in the Wires for individuals who take a particular interest in the career fields pertaining to Information Technology for obvious reasons. I would also love to recommend this book for average readers as well. Mitnick isn't too verbose with his technical explanations and it is fairly easy for one who might not be the most savvy with advanced technological concepts and terminology to follow along. The narrative also allows for readers to become engrossed into the non-fictitious adrenaline filled encounters with the police; which also has the negative effect of becoming repetitive throughout the book. However, this memoir is superb in both aspects of recollection and reflection and is a wonderful read. - Jack M.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gteat, exhilirating, and fun book. Just make sure that you're okay with cursing before you start reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is what it is: story after story after story of Kevin hacking or manipulating someone to get at whatever his arbitrary goal happened to be that day. Maybe I just don't have a great deal of respect for hackers in general but after the 200 pages of 'Ghost in the Wires' I was already ready to move on only to find I was just half way through. I expected it to be more computer-centric but in fact, a majority of his hacking seems to be schmoozing someone at the telephone company or DMV to give him information. The book was well enough written but it left a sour opinion of Kevin for me. Taking advantage of people. Stealing. Lying. There's nothing to be proud of here. The only great thing is at the end of it all, Kevin uses his skills to help companies become more secure.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In Ghost in the Wires, Kevin Mitnick retells his personal story of how he became a wanted hacker. The fascinating story of manipulation and cold-heartedness is brought to life by Mitnick's own antisocial and devilish personality. While the book focuses a lot on the technical aspect of things, Mitnick brilliantly expresses his own emotions and motives during these events. Because he was telling a personal story, Mitnick struck a balance between technology and auto-biography. Mitnick was really able to weave details of his personal life into the technical parts, and vice versa. The book was wildly entertaining and satisfyingly educational.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the perfect blend of story and technical detail that explains how Mitnick performed many of his hacks. The story is captivating from beginning to end. I'm surprised someone hasn't created a movie loosely based on the facts. If any Hollywood producers are reading this, I suggestion the title "Takedown".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Willie-890 More than 1 year ago
One may or may not like what Mitnick did but he has written a book full of lessons for those of us using digital devices in the course of living our lives. He exposes the weaknesses we as users have and the system has that expose us to those who wish to compromise our information for fun or financial gain. This is a serious must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this to follow up on an article I read in WIRED about the author. Fascinating article. The book is even better. Why? It goes into more personal details about Kevin. Relationships. Work. Home. How he got into "Super-Hacking". It appealed to my "inner Robin Hood" complex. This guy goes after Ma Bell, the DMV, and the Government. Bad Dude. His brushes with the law. Evasion. Eventual capture. His conversion to expert consultant to corporate and law enforcement. All of this made for a GREAT book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book! It really is spectacular, but needs a better ending.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HunterSeeker More than 1 year ago
Great book. I was left admiring Mitnick for his experiences, even though they were criminal by and large, and questioning the way our legal system treats cases like his.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago